?Important Questions?

loylobby
28th June 2009, 09:10
In the good old days when Shell had millions of ships, captains with real character/reputation and large crews, I remember when first joining any illustrious Shell Tanker my first few questions were:-
"Who is the old man and what's he like?"...."How long has he got in?"
"What's the chow like?"....
"What are the orders?"...
I would then have a look down the muster list to see if I recognised any names I had sailed with before. Funny how the results of those cursory investigations could set the tone for a trip.
Once those formalities were over it was then it was down to business and countdown to pay-off.

mikeg
28th June 2009, 10:08
How true! (Smoke) A pretty good barometer on how the trip will be - if you're lucky enough to get a great old man, good chow and lots of good comrades you've sailed with before then life's gonna be a peach. Of course it goes the other way - an old man joins with you that you'd rather not be with, slow steaming to the gulf with lousy chow.(Cloud)

sparkie2182
28th June 2009, 12:20
When the Cheng.....Mate....Ch Steward ...... sends telegrams demanding to be relieved after being told a certain Master is about to join..........

not a good omen.

KEITH SEVILLE
29th June 2009, 06:35
I agree with all your comments. As the ships agent I used to witness these remarks particularly on Asprella when we heard Jimmy Brit was joining, a shudder went down the spine of the ship.He did about three to four voyages on her to Curacao/Guayanilla from Stanlow and then when his replacement came Captain George Bennison, a much more liked skipper there was calm again. Captain Bennison left and Captain Ron Kerley came equally a very easy going chap who it was a privilege to work with.

Pat Kennedy
29th June 2009, 08:49
I agree with all your comments. As the ships agent I used to witness these remarks particularly on Asprella when we heard Jimmy Brit was joining, a shudder went down the spine of the ship.He did about three to four voyages on her to Curacao/Guayanilla from Stanlow and then when his replacement came Captain George Bennison, a much more liked skipper there was calm again. Captain Bennison left and Captain Ron Kerley came equally a very easy going chap who it was a privilege to work with.
Keith,
In your capacity as ship's agent for Shell in Liverpool, do you remember a pair of brothers who were appropriated pilots for Shell?
I think their name was Meggeson.
I assume you worked for Bahr Behrend who I recall were Shells agents on Merseyside.

Best regards,
Pat

loylobby
29th June 2009, 09:19
I assume you worked for Bahr Behrend who I recall were Shells agents on Merseyside.

Best regards,
Pat

I thought Brinnings were the Shell agents in that area or was that just for Stanlow?

Pat Kennedy
29th June 2009, 09:48
You see, this is the problem with memory. I was sure it was Bahr Behrend, then someone mention Brinings, and now I'm sure it was Brinings.
Cheers,
Pat

loylobby
29th June 2009, 11:42
You see, this is the problem with memory. I was sure it was Bahr Behrend, then someone mention Brinings, and now I'm sure it was Brinings.
Cheers,
Pat
I didn't remember it, a good memory is not my forte either.

I found it scribbled in our old address book from when my wife used to visit the Halia at Stanlow and Eastham. (Sad isn't it I still have an address book from 1985 in amongst my possessions)

KEITH SEVILLE
29th June 2009, 11:56
Pat

Brinings were the agents for the Shell owned or Time Chartered Vessels both at Tranmere,Eastham,Stanlow and Ince for a great many years.
Eventually our firm was taken over by OBC Shipping who remain as the Shell Agents, sadly that was the time after about 2 years when I was made redundant i.e. 2001.
The pilots you referred to are John Megginson and I think his brother was called Charles Megginson. John was the senior pilot for Shell and is still alive, living near Chester.

Best Regards
Keith