In search of MV Tollan

peterlisbon
28th June 2009, 17:17
Hi

I'm searching for leading information that could tell me more about an old friend in my childhood.

In February of 1980 a British cargo ship sank near the Praça do Comércio, in Lisbon. He hit a Swidish vessel and he turned over, killing four crewmen while 20 saved their lives.

M.V. Tollan was his name.

I hope this is the right spelling name. It could be "Tolan" or "Tollens", has I found in the internet.

It took 3 year to the local authorities to remove him from the Tagus River. He got famous and a huge popularity as this ship was stubborn.
They tried a couple times to remove it and in one night the Navy got the clue and through it into a shipyard to be cut in pieces.

I was a little kid at the time and going to river shore on Sundays was the ice cake when I did well at school.
The boat got a lot nicknames like "The Red Whale" or "The Seagull Carrier". Quite fun.


I'm doing a research about this cargo ship.
I would like to know where I can get records and more informations about the shipyard, the specs, company and the whole early story.

Here are some pictures about the sunk boat:

http://tollan.tugas.co.uk/im/tolan_virado_tejo.jpg

http://tollan.tugas.co.uk/im/tollan_tejo.jpg

http://tollan.tugas.co.uk/im/tollens_no_tejo.jpg

http://tollan.tugas.co.uk/im/tollan_rio_tejo.jpg

If someone can point me into a direction, I would appreciate it.

Regards,

P

K urgess
28th June 2009, 17:27
This ship listed at Miramar seems to fit the bill.
http://www.miramarshipindex.org.nz/ship/show/304015
At least a starting point
Regards

BillH
28th June 2009, 17:32
Hi

I'm searching for leading information that could tell me more about an old friend in my childhood.

In February of 1980 a British cargo ship sank near the Praça do Comércio, in Lisbon. He hit a Swidish vessel and he turned over, killing four crewmen while 20 saved their lives.

M.V. Tollan was his name.

I hope this is the right spelling name. It could be "Tolan" or "Tollens", has I found in the internet.

It took 3 year to the local authorities to remove him from the Tagus River. He got famous and a huge popularity as this ship was stubborn.
They tried a couple times to remove it and in one night the Navy got the clue and through it into a shipyard to be cut in pieces.

I was a little kid at the time and going to river shore on Sundays was the ice cake when I did well at school.
The boat got a lot nicknames like "The Red Whale" or "The Seagull Carrier". Quite fun.


I'm doing a research about this cargo ship.
I would like to know where I can get records and more informations about the shipyard, the specs, company and the whole early story.

Here are some pictures about the sunk boat:

http://tollan.tugas.co.uk/im/tolan_virado_tejo.jpg

http://tollan.tugas.co.uk/im/tollan_tejo.jpg

http://tollan.tugas.co.uk/im/tollens_no_tejo.jpg

http://tollan.tugas.co.uk/im/tollan_rio_tejo.jpg

If someone can point me into a direction, I would appreciate it.

Regards,

P
TOLLAN (1979 - 1980) Tackler class.
O.N. 384217. 2,800g. 1,162n. 4,628d. 114.94(BB) x 19.77 x 5.28 metres.
9-cyl. 4 S.C.S.A. (450 x 520mm) MaK 9M552AK type oil engine manufactured by Ube Industries Ltd., Ube, geared to a controllable pitch propeller. 6,800 BHP, 15 kts. Thwartship thrust controllable pitch propeller forward.

1978: Keel laid as TACKLER CARIBIA by Kasado Dock Company Ltd., Kudamatsu (Yard No. 315) for Tackler 3 Ltd., (Sea Containers Chartering Ltd., managers), Bermuda.

22.2.1979: Launched as TOLLAN.

5.1979: Completed.

16.2.1980: Collided in fog with a floating crane on the River Tagus near Lisbon, Portugal, capsized and sank.
Subsequently declared a total loss and the wreck sold to Sotramar, Italy.

2.12.1983: Wreck was righted and refloated for berthing and resale.
No further details.


TACKLER CLASS. Five ordered from same shipbuilder but only four constructed
- Yard No. 314 cancelled.
Ice strengthened, gearless, RoRo cargo/containership.
Side door/ramp on starboard aft.
126 x 20' containers or 40' equivalents in the hold.
168 x 20' containers or 40' equivalents on the deck.

melliget
29th June 2009, 06:42
Hi.

Here's a little info from The Times (dated 18 Feb 1980).

regards,

Martin