Annual Stores

loylobby
30th June 2009, 10:34
As a deck cadet in the "good old days", before individual ships budgets, the ISSA catalogue and better logistics for storing I remember doing the inventory for Annual Stores.

The C/O gave me and two other cadets the book... the stores bible.
It was about the size of a telephone directory and contained a super dooper list of every single item of deckside equipment that was required to carried by a Shell tanker of that class. Our task was to locate every single piece of equipment on the list, find the r.o.b. figure and its condition.

It was a real learning curve; I learned all about identifying the different types of rope and wire, the many different types of tools, gadgets and thingymabobs used on board. The list was endless from large items like a capstan bar down to different sizes of woodscrews and nails, from spare port holes and glass to the sanisnake and rods. Cargo stuff - ullage tapes, hydrometers, thermometers, sample cans. Blocks for the derricks. Paint. As I say blooming everything.

So at least once in a year we knew where everything was on board!

It took for ages and was quite laborious but it certainly beat chipping and painting and tank diving.

An even bigger work up was when the stores arrived, having to check it off and get it stowed in the proper place. I suppose it was an important job really because as it says ANNUAL stores and it wasn't so easy to get stuff that you "forgot".

I presume the engineers had to go through exactly the same process.

KEITH SEVILLE
30th June 2009, 10:54
Loylobby

I think the term given for annual stores was seastock.
Often I had to get the fresh,dry provisions and deck and engine stores indents and pass them on to the local shipchandler for supply and delivery.
We would get the Shell Superintendent visiting for this puirpose.
Mac or George McCree was the senior man and was a real worker and very easy to get on with.
Do you remember Sam Cadden our Irish friend or Ray Riseborough from Geordy Land. Dean Grube and Jim Knight were others. For me Mac was the best!! Although I did get on with the others.

Regards
Keith

loylobby
30th June 2009, 11:51
We would get the Shell Superintendent visiting for this puirpose.
Mac or George McCree was the senior man and was a real worker and very easy to get on with.
Do you remember Sam Cadden our Irish friend or Ray Riseborough from Geordy Land. Dean Grube and Jim Knight were others.

Yes I remember those names, another stores super was Tony Walmsley. As you say they would supervise the actual taking of the annual stores, with all their fancy codes for the items and different departments.
They would also be in attendance at new buildings to ensure the correct spares stock was on board and properly indexed, cross referenced, "i's" dotted and "t's" crossed and forms signed in triplicate with the ships stamp!! (If I remember rightly, even the Ships Stamp was one of the inventory items.

If I remember rightly we took our annual stores in Rotterdam on a "V" boat and in Singapore on the Arianta as these were the European and Far Eastern hubs; that was in the early 1970's.

I think ship chandlers must have rubbed their hands together when they saw an annual stores list land on their desk.

KEITH SEVILLE
30th June 2009, 15:19
The stores orders or indents was always signed twice, firstly by head of the dept onboard beit Chief Engineer, Chief Steward etc and countersigned by the Captain with the Ships Stamp.
As you say most of the ships stored Rotterdam but we gave them their annual stores here at Tranmere, Eastham or Stanlow from time to time.
Burnyeats later became United Mersey Supply and MacSymons later became J.P.Lamb,they were the Shell approved Ship Chandlers.
They were very pleased when an annual stores order like this, was given to them

Regards
Keith

Pat Kennedy
30th June 2009, 20:07
Keith,
ref J.P Lamb, I dealt with them fairly frequently when I worked for a company who supplied and maintained safety equipment on board ships.
I did hear that the owners of Lambs were Counciller Doreen Jones , who later became Mayor of Liverpool, and her husband who I think was also a counciller.
Lambs was a real old fashioned ship's chandlers, their stores, somewhere around Paradise St, near the infamous Dr Ross's, was chocka block with ropes and wires and smelled of tarred hemp. I used to enjoy going in there.
A lot of ship's agency chaps used to have the liquid lunch in the Oriel, downstairs, and there used to be a very fetching lady journalist from the Liverpool Journal of Commerce, who was always the centre of attention.
It was there that I discovered that gin and tonic was a perfectly acceptable substitute for food at lunchtime.
Happy Days,
Pat(Thumb)

Billieboy
30th June 2009, 21:02
Yes I remember those names, another stores super was Tony Walmsley. As you say they would supervise the actual taking of the annual stores, with all their fancy codes for the items and different departments.

I knew Tony Walmsley, his last job was to redesign and modernise the Ship's Inventory, (S1 I think it was), took him and a few of his department nearly a year to finish check and run a couple of trials. Crab Fat, (Mercurial ointment), was one of the most unpopular items dropped, at least on Steam Turbine ships!

I remember George McCree, Sam Cadden, Ray Riseborough and Jim Knight, Met one or two of them at midnight at MOT, EMO, Shell Europoort or other berths in Rotterdam. We all used to stay at the same Hotel in Oostvoorne, waiting for the ships coming in or getting a bit of shut-eye between ships on a long weekend. (Thumb)

P.S. Does anyone know where Jack Bardsley,(Eng. Supt.), is? I've lost his E-mail adress, thanks in advance.

James_C
30th June 2009, 21:07
Interesting to read of the codes to describe the ships inventory and stores.
In BP the main ships store was known by the code 'F1', this continued long after the official term was discontinued.
You used to be able to find all sorts of weird and wonderful junk in there, especially those items which were placed aboard the ship bound for somewhere else but never quite got there.
I remember being on the British Skill as late as 2001 and having a rake through the Store looking for Radar 'bits' whereupon I found, at the back of a shelf, a complete set of wooden capstan bars. There was a little tag attached to them, which read "British Resource, to be landed at Lagos, Nigeria".
Quite how they ended up on there is anyones guess, never mind what they were actually intended for!
Apologies to the thread starter, but that completely useless titbit of information had been swimming around in the grey matter for some time!

KEITH SEVILLE
1st July 2009, 11:58
Hi Pat

J.P.Lambs was on the Dock Road near to Queens Dock opposite side of the road. Trevor Jones was the M.D.there a nice chap to work with.
Some good watering holes around that area too Baltic Fleet etc.

Regards
Keith