Cruise Ships Under Construction - June 2009

fred henderson
30th June 2009, 16:44
The trade publication Cruise & Ferry Info has just updated its Cruise Ships on Order data as at 10 June 2009: -

Northern European shipyards: 16 Ships; 1,953,683 GT; 48,854 lower berths; $11,650,000,000 contract value
Southern European shipyards: 18 Ships; 1,218,095 GT; 29,552 lower berths; $7,813,000,000 contract value
There is also a small (104 passenger) vessel on order in USA and a 168 passenger vessel building in Canada (delivery currently estimated to be 18 months late)

The Northern European shipyards involved are: -
Meyer Werft; 9 ships
STX France; 5 ships
STX Finland; 2 ships

The Southern European shipyards are;
Fincantieri; 13 ships
Mariotti; 3 ships
Factoria de Naval (Spain); 1 sailing ship for Sea Cloud
Greece; 1 ship that has been uncompleted for years and seems to be shuttled around various yards and owners

The owners of the 34 ships building in Europe are: -
Carnival Group: 14 ships
Royal Caribbean Group: 6 ships
MSC Crociere: 4 ships
Disney: 2 ships
Oceania: 2 ships
Iles du Ponant: 2 ships
NCL: 1 ship
Silversea: 1 ship
Sea Cloud: 1 ship
Greek: 1 ship

The only cruise ship cancellation since the start of the credit crunch has been one 150,000GT vessel for NCL ordered from STX France.

Fred (Thumb)

shamrock
30th June 2009, 17:01
The link below gives you a list of the newbuilds, their due date and their cost per berth, which is quite an eye opener...

http://www.cruise-community.com/index.php?option=com_wrapper&view=wrapper&Itemid=79

For example, the new Queen Elizabeth will cost a total of $708m at a cost per berth of $338,432.12. Place that against the Norwegian Epic (one of an original 3 ships that have been trimmed to a single one) the overall cost is $1.2bn at a cost per berth of $0.29.

Ponant Cruises used to be known as Compagnie des lles du Ponant, and they are the luxury cruise division of CMA CGM. They have a couple of newbuilds on the books, they also hit the headlines last summer after Le Ponant was hijacked by Somali pirates and kept hostage for several days.

sidsal
30th June 2009, 21:13
How on earth are they going to fill all those berths ? I would imagine that there is already over capacity.
On a personal basis , having done quite a few cruises over many years, my wife and I have decided that after our last cruise on P&O's Artemis ( ex Royal Princess), we will not do any more. Reason - every port where we called was grossly overcrowded.
If we cruise again it will be in small ships calling in out-of-the way places.

shamrock
30th June 2009, 21:21
The two biggest are Oasis & Allure of the Seas from RCI, all up berths 8000 passengers, 5400 lower berths only each. Norwegian Epic isn't far behind.

I much prefer small ships, hence my trip next year, the ship is under 30k tons and less than 900 people sharing the space...perfection :)

Ron Stringer
30th June 2009, 23:10
..the new Queen Elizabeth will cost a total of $708m at a cost per berth of $338,432.12.

..the Norwegian Epic overall cost is $1.2bn at a cost per berth of $0.29.

Maths was never my strongest talent but based on that investment, to get a cost of 29 cents per berth, the Epic must have more berths than Beijing. Could someone please explain what is going on and where the error lies?

fred henderson
1st July 2009, 16:10
Maths was never my strongest talent but based on that investment, to get a cost of 29 cents per berth, the Epic must have more berths than Beijing. Could someone please explain what is going on and where the error lies?

Its a spread-sheet error on the website Ron. The site became confused when the ship price was expressed in $billions. The correct cost per lower berth is $285,714.

Fred (Thumb)

fred henderson
1st July 2009, 16:50
How on earth are they going to fill all those berths ? I would imagine that there is already over capacity.
On a personal basis , having done quite a few cruises over many years, my wife and I have decided that after our last cruise on P&O's Artemis ( ex Royal Princess), we will not do any more. Reason - every port where we called was grossly overcrowded.
If we cruise again it will be in small ships calling in out-of-the way places.

The cruise industry standard measurement is lower-berth occupation. The Pullman berth prices are peanuts so they are ignored. In the second quarter of 2008, Carnival Group carried 1,985,000 passengers with an average load factor of 104.8%. In the second quarter of 2009 they carried 2,029,000 passengers but the load factor fell slightly to 103.3%.

Carnival continues to do well and fill its ships; Royal Caribbean has a few problems; NCL continues to have major troubles. It is the small operators, with old ships that are in the greatest danger.

Fred (Thumb)

Satanic Mechanic
1st July 2009, 16:52
Fred

Whats a load factor?

Ron Stringer
1st July 2009, 17:26
In the second quarter of 2008, Carnival Group carried 1,985,000 passengers with an average load factor of 104.8%. In the second quarter of 2009 they carried 2,029,000 passengers but the load factor fell slightly to 103.3%.

Bloody hell, Fred, now you really are confusing me. If their load factor is more than 100%, does that mean that all the berths are full and they are taking passengers as deck cargo? Don't fancy it myself.[=P]

Many thanks for the cost/berth clarification.

fred henderson
1st July 2009, 17:27
Fred

Whats a load factor?

The number of passenger days sold as a percentage of the number of lower berths offered. Lower berths = two berths per cabin. Occupation of Pullman berths in cabins by children, etc pushes the load factor over 100%

Fred (Thumb)