First Trip Memories

Alan Rawlinson
1st July 2009, 08:30
Reading a member's comment that ' first trips are never forgotten' must be worth a new thread subject.....

For me it was the FORTHBANK 1951, and I remember halfway across the Atlantic and lightship to Trinidad, we first trip apprentices joined a solemn party to try and stop a leak in No 5 hold where a rivet had started. There must have been 5 or 6 of us in total, with Chippy, the C/O and the 'old man' in a boiler suit! ( pretty rare in those days)

It was such a serious moment, I thought we must be sinking!

Cheers//AL

Arthur Miller
1st July 2009, 22:01
The Lochybank, January 1953 in Manchester. She had docked with about 20 cats on board and duely had to be de-catted. Except for one who lived with the old Maltese carpenter in a cabin on the after end of the boat deck.
In due course "Mary" gave birth to four kittens, born in the carpenters bunk. But she was a fickle female and deserted in Australia along with her kits and a few other members of the crew.

jimthehat
1st July 2009, 23:18
maplebank joined 26/8/52,lightship to new orleans suffered major engine room fire just before picking up the Missipp pilot,didnot really know what was going on ,but ship was run aground and preparations were made to abandon ship as fire was still burning ,help arrived with the arrival of two firefighting boats .
after fire was extinguished we spent two weeks in Todd Johnson drydoc ,and then resumed voyage.
Master then disappeared whilst crossing the pacific,very evential and unforgettable voyage.

JIM

Macphail
1st July 2009, 23:47
My very first trip was on the BF steam ship Perseus, July 1961, Dutch Chief Engineer, De Snoo, ( Do not call me Chief, only Sir !.), Captain Liptrop,
Joined Gladstone Dock , sailed up KG5 Glasgow, filled the holds with crates of good Scottish Whisky, some Glasgow thieves did all open cabins over, sad time, personal items and cash pinched, sailed down to Vittoria dock Birkenhead, drunken dockies staggering around trying to sell pilfered Johnny Walker Black Label.

John.

Charlie Stitt
2nd July 2009, 13:38
Myrtlebank in 1955 from Falmouth to Trinadad, a bit of sea and swell but to me a hurricane, checking stores right aft next to the steering gear, I can still hear the groans of that old steering gear and the smell of tarred hemp etc, also vivid memories of running up the ladder a few times to shout hughie over the rail. It did'nt help of course to have the senior Apprentices ''my mates'' talk about a big piece of fatty pork being swallowed then brought back up again on the end of a piece of string. ugh. Those first few days of my first trip were even worse than the hangover I had after the engineers introduced me to the rum and coke when we finally arrived in Trinadad. Those good shipmates also introduced me to someone who looked a bit like (Hippy)

Charlie Stitt
3rd September 2010, 22:43
The'' First Trip'' which meant so much to me, was my first trip as a Certificated Third Mate. My career had really kicked off, I really felt part of the team, Bankline were building loads of new ships, great opportunities lay ahead. I joined the Laganbank at Bromborough Dock 15th Dec 1959, brand new 2nd Mates Cert in my pocket, yes I really was somebody now, and the ship I was joining was a real Copra Boat, Happy Days. Then I thought, what if the Old Man is one of those bad guys I heard about? I need'nt have worried, Capt R A Leach was the Master, a real gentleman who taught me a lot during the trip. He had the knack of making me feel as if I was involved in decision making, ''shall we say twelve minutes past for full away, Third Mate''? yes sir, twelve minutes past,'' shall we let her run another three miles before coming on to the next leg, Third Mate''? yes Sir, etc etc. That was the trip when I decided, Bankline was for me. We were back in Birkenhead 12th July 1960,. I signed on for another copra trip to get my sea time in for Mates, and then, guess what? I joined the Laganbank in Greenock for my FIRST TRIP as Second Mate, and still on the Copra Run. Where else would you get it ??

Alan Rawlinson
4th September 2010, 08:46
First trip 3rd mate - Irisbank - same feeling, Charlie, I've made it here, with a still hot 2nd Mates ticket, shiny new sextant bought on a bank loan, etc.

Only difference was that the Master was a very severe but well meaning character called D Palmer. We had one of our frequent clashes in the chartroom when I said in desperation '' I am doing my best '' and he uttered the immortal words '' Well, your best is not good enough, Mister ''

He told me many times to stay out on the bridge wing and not to enter the wheelhouse unless for a good reason.

Another strange anecdote.........

We passed an island in the dark in the Pacific on the 8 to 12 watch, and I spotted a flickering light sending out SOS as the island as it came abeam. Called Palmer to the bridge, who at first said I was imagining things. Then it came again with him watching this time. He wandered off into the chartroom to study the Pilot book, and returned to say, Oh well, there is a schooner due here every six months, and we steamed on..

R396040
4th September 2010, 14:07
First trip 1947/8 MV Loch Garth Royal Mail Lines as galley boy. Main first impressions unrationed food and unbelievable scenery and places for a wartime kid. Just the right trip for it too first port Bermuda,Bahamas, Jamaica.Venzuela,Panama west coast of States and Canada. Couldnt believe the gear in shops and able to go ashore in all ports. Loaded in Oakland homeward for Bremen with full US army cargo mainly dried fruit. Bremen very battered,gaping bomb craters and non faternisation still in place, 20 Lucky Strike (a $1 for 200 YMCA club Panama ) would give you a great night out in all respects. Nice to get back to Vic Dks and home to spin a few nautical stories to unbelieving exschool friends.
Woulnt have missed it .... Went on for thirty years at sea.
Stuart
France

Alan Rawlinson
17th September 2010, 18:14
I'm slightly ashamed to bring this up, but 59 years on, it deserves a mention, what the heck!

On my first trip, on the dear old Forthbank, I was detailed off to clean the brass on the binnacle on the monkey island, and took a steelson wrench to the soft ron Kelvon's Balls on the binnacle, intending to lift them off for better access.. After I had lifted one off - apolexy all round!!

jimthehat
17th September 2010, 19:13
I'm slightly ashamed to bring this up, but 59 years on, it deserves a mention!

On my first trip, on the dear old Forthbank, I was detailed off to clean the brass on the binnacle on the monkey island, and took a steelson wrench to the soft ron Kelvon's Balls on the binnacle, intending to lift them off for better access.. Apolexy all round!!


Re kelvins spheres,
on a recent cruise up on the bridge I asked the senior 2/0(navigator) about the mag compass,to my surprise i found out that the compass as we knew it is gone ,he knew absolutely nothing about the devescope and doing the corrections for orals,thats a shame cos i liked messing around on the devescope up at school.

jim

Joe C
20th September 2010, 16:14
Re kelvins spheres,
on a recent cruise up on the bridge I asked the senior 2/0(navigator) about the mag compass,to my surprise i found out that the compass as we knew it is gone ,he knew absolutely nothing about the devescope and doing the corrections for orals,thats a shame cos i liked messing around on the devescope up at school.

jim

When my granddaughter was at Cambridge I warned her that
"Cambridge Dons Make Virgins Tremble"and until I explained that it was a mnemonic she thought I had joined the dirty old men club!

Klaatu83
20th September 2010, 16:49
My first foreign port was Leith, the seaport of Edinburgh, in Scotland. As a cadet on a training ship, I was required to go ashore in uniform which, in those days, meant khaki. Everyone I met exhibited an atrociously heavy and incomprehensible accent - until I mentioned that I was American.

"Och, you're a Yank! We knew you were foreign, but we though you were ENGLISH!

After that the accents largely disappeared and we got on just fine. It was the uniform that caused the misunderstanding. In Britain, apparently, only the army wears Khaki. It seems that we had been mistaken for soldiers belonging to an English regiment!

Johnnietwocoats
21st September 2010, 04:42
When my granddaughter was at Cambridge I warned her that
"Cambridge Dons Make Virgins Tremble"and until I explained that it was a mnemonic she thought I had joined the dirty old men club!

In belfast we were the opposite....

True
Virgins
Make
Dull
Company

(Smoke)

Alan Rawlinson
21st September 2010, 08:12
Or,

C-adburys
D-airy
M-ilk
V=ery
T-asty





In belfast we were the opposite....

True
Virgins
Make
Dull
Company

(Smoke)