Bank Line From 1960.

Charlie Stitt
13th July 2009, 20:47
I saw in the New Year of 1960 as 3rd Mate of the Laganbank leaving Birkenhead for the Gulf Ports, I had a brand new 2nd Mates certificate and felt 10 ft tall.I enjoyed two copra run trips as 3/0, sat Mates then one trip as 2/0, I loved that ship. The Bank Line was the place to be at that time as the oceans were awash with new, not modern, but new, comfortable Bankboats, they were leaving the shipyards non stop and they all had some if not plenty of leisure deck space. I was gutted when in 1963, I saw the Roybank had the accommodation extended out to the ships side, NO more deck to relax on, to me that was the end of the Bankboats as I knew and liked them, Progress ? I really enjoyed my first trip as 2nd Mate although I must admit my treatments as medic were questionable, at the beginning of the trip a long queue would be waiting at the medical locker, that dwindled away to a few in the first month when word went around, that b*** 2nd Officer Sahib no good, always gives black jallop for everything.Two more trips, Inverbank and Foylebank got my time in for Masters. I must say again, I really enjoyed being a 2nd Mate, and if given the chance of doing one trip again, I would, without hesitation choose the 20 months on Inverbank. Back later as C/O.(Thumb)

Charlie Stitt
17th July 2009, 12:11
In Jan 1965 a Chief Eng Fred Sharpe and myself flew out to Mombasa to join the Teakbank . We arrived to find her all loaded up, engine warmed through and ready to sail, glad to see you Mate, get yourself changed we are sailing now says Capt Jack Reed. The chief and I were replacements for a Chief and Mate who had a fight where the Mate was hospitalized and the Chief was sacked, interesting start to my first trip as Mate. As it turned out I really enjoyed my time on that ship as she was on the India Africa run with uncomplicated cargo stowage, Harry Dillon was 3rd Mate, ''later to become a B/L Master'' and was of great assistance to me, the 2nd Mate'' who had a dusty Master's Cert '' was unhelpfull as he was reather sore at not getting made up to Mate, I had a lot of knife wounds in my back at payoff time. We finally loaded in Calcutta for West Africa, completing discharge in Dakar where we loaded coca beans for Boston and New York where we paid off. Some other names. McKinney r/o, Bruce 3/e, Blackburn 4/e, Henderson Lecky, Neale 2nd Lecky, Apps Carpender,Hitchcock, Mathews.

K urgess
17th July 2009, 13:21
Pictures of the Harry (Matt) Dillon I knew on the weirbank here -
http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/showphoto.php?photo=35960
http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/showphoto.php?photo=36177
and I think this may have been his first command
http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/showphoto.php?photo=49403
http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/showphoto.php?photo=49554

Great guy and we were very sorry to lose him when he had his accident in Melbourne.

Charlie Stitt
17th July 2009, 14:13
Yes Kris, that is the same Harry Dillon I knew, he joined the Teakbank and Bank Line from Donaldsons, as you say, great shipmate. What happened to him in Aussie?

K urgess
17th July 2009, 15:02
He fell down the deep tank and thoroughly smashed both his ankles on the heating coils during an inspection (lids were off).
This is where it gets a bit hazy because I don't have a note about him being replaced.
Knowing my memory it may have been that the accident happened on another ship and we got to know about it next time back on the Weirbank. He didn't do the second trip with us.
John Hebblewhite who's just joined SN might remember better than me.
I know they successfully rebuilt his ankles and he went on to be master of the Lossiebank because I met him again in Madang as per the last two pictures.
The best exponent of "Bazaar Baht" I've ever heard.
Cheers
Kris

John Hebblewhite
23rd July 2009, 20:17
Harry Dillon known as Matt for obivious reasons, the heating coils had to lifted and lashed to the side for dry cargo on the US-Aust run,they were not strong enough to load on even with plenty of dunnage,as soon as these tanks were emptied they were prepared for coconut oil from Rabaul, this meant all these coils had to be re-laid and joined.Matt was going down the tank to see how it was going and his feet slipped on the ladder and I think he caught a coil at the bottom with gave him an uneven landing space for his feet and caused him the damage mentioned earlier. He went straight to hospital,his replacement was Guy Peto.

John

Johnnietwocoats
23rd July 2009, 22:27
Harry Dillon known as Matt for obivious reasons, the heating coils had to lifted and lashed to the side for dry cargo on the US-Aust run,they were not strong enough to load on even with plenty of dunnage,as soon as these tanks were emptied they were prepared for coconut oil from Rabaul, this meant all these coils had to be re-laid and joined.Matt was going down the tank to see how it was going and his feet slipped on the ladder and I think he caught a coil at the bottom with gave him an uneven landing space for his feet and caused him the damage mentioned earlier. He went straight to hospital,his replacement was Guy Peto.

John

John: See my post to you in the Silent Majority Thread....Coats

Charlie Stitt
26th July 2009, 11:48
The year 1960 saw the Myrtlebank go to the scrapheap in China, my ship,, (Sad) on which I served the first 16 months of my sea career, that year also saw off the last of the Liberty's. By 1964 all the twin screw ships, including the White Ships and all traces of steam, including auxiliary boilers, gone, leaving the mv Eastbank with her electric winches etc ,the oldest ship in the fleet, no more Bankline for steam Engineers. Yes the 1960's saw in a few important changes in Weirs.

ianian
2nd August 2009, 07:02
Harry Dillon known as Matt for obivious reasons, the heating coils had to lifted and lashed to the side for dry cargo on the US-Aust run,they were not strong enough to load on even with plenty of dunnage,as soon as these tanks were emptied they were prepared for coconut oil from Rabaul, this meant all these coils had to be re-laid and joined.Matt was going down the tank to see how it was going and his feet slipped on the ladder and I think he caught a coil at the bottom with gave him an uneven landing space for his feet and caused him the damage mentioned earlier. He went straight to hospital,his replacement was Guy Peto.

John

Hi John, think I sailed with you on the Dartbank, the old man was Brian Peterson and the mate was Colin Medlicott, both great blokes my self I was
2nd/eng' joined vessel in Lagos. Regards ianian