Sealing tragedy triggers coast guard towing changes

shamrock
15th July 2009, 10:21
The federal government has brought in new towing policies for the coast guard in response to several probes into last year's deadly accident involving a disabled sealing vessel off the coast of Cape Breton.

The measures revealed by the government Tuesday include better sharing of information and tracking vessels, and new guidelines for dealing with disabled vessels.

Transport Canada is also developing new fishing-vessel safety regulations that include revised provisions for vessels that may navigate ice-covered waters, the government said in a release.

The 12-metre trawler L'Acadien II, from the Īles de la Madeleine, Que., was being towed on March 29, 2008, by the Sir William Alexander in the Gulf of St. Lawrence when the small boat hit an ice block and capsized.

...cont.../..

http://www.cbc.ca/canada/nova-scotia/story/2009/07/14/sealing-vessel-tragedy071409.html

JoK
15th July 2009, 13:44
Very tragic accident.
DFO should have been keelhauled for their practice of practically no standards for vessels participating in the seal hunt and we can't forget Transport Canada who has NO regulatory requirements for stability of fishing vessels.
A recipe for disaster.

Keltic Star
16th July 2009, 06:47
Very tragic accident.
DFO should have been keelhauled for their practice of practically no standards for vessels participating in the seal hunt and we can't forget Transport Canada who has NO regulatory requirements for stability of fishing vessels.
A recipe for disaster.

And I don't think we should hold our breath for the new regulations to be introduced, there's too many votes at stake in the fishing ports and political power with the fish processors.

When you think of it, adopting what the working level Transport Canada guy's would like to see in the regulations is not that much more complex or expensive if incorporated at the construction stage. But I don't think that anything the size of our fishing boats could ever be designed and built to be "ice proof"

JoK
16th July 2009, 13:38
Exactly.
I had this discussion with the naval architects we deal with, when I read what was claimed the costs where to do the stability for an existing hull. I thought that the writer was pulling a fast one, but in Eastern Canada it was between 5-10k and the cost of hauling the boat for measurements.
Given that there has been some high profile accidents in Canada with FVs capsizing due to stability, you would expect that the owners would rush to have their boat done, but no. I guess ignorance is better then knowing that you have a problem (EEK) that needs to be addressed. Or it could be more a simple matter of ignorance on the part of the FV owner.
TC cancelled the requirements years ago, that specified the vessels allowed in the ice for sealing. As a result, FVs are loaded with all the required gear-on the deck, putting all the added weight up good and high- and head into the ice.
Then CG is expected to somehow keep these people safe in conditions that could range from the ice pack opening up with the wind conditions or conversely packing in to the point that the FV is crushed or popped out of the ice pack on top.
I know the people on the CG ship and they did not deserve the treatment they recieved at the hands of the media or from the crew of the Warlord.
While the FV Acadien ll was suspended from the ships boom and the crew of the CG ship did all they possibly could to cut through the hull to get to the people inside, the FV Warlord sat alongside with their crew screaming abuse and hate to the CG ship. Emotions were high and people were terribly devestated.
Most of what has been printed in the media is not true, but the Warlord owner keeps promulgating his story without listening to actual facts.