Bankline - Where's the silent majority?

Alan Rawlinson
16th July 2009, 20:56
It must have occurred to readers of these threads that the number of viewings compared to postings on the Bankline sub category is quite a high ratio. Also, a good proportion of the viewings are likely to be by ex Bankline staff who, for some reason, stay silent. ( I know, - many think we are all talking twaddle!)

Someone earlier was calculating the numbers of seagoing staff at peak times, based on 50 plus ships steaming around the globe at any one time. Allowing for the natural turnover of staff, it still adds up to several thousand ex members. Some that I know can't handle the technology - some never use the internet etc etc, but there is still a large number of individuals who will have thoughts - good or bad - and fascinating stories of the Bankline days that we would all enjoy reading.

Seriously, it would be great to have postings from a wider number than the 2 dozen or so stalwarts......

Let's hear it from the silent majority - please!

AL

jimthehat
16th July 2009, 23:20
going on from Alans thread,may i suggest that when the silent majority reply that they name their ships and dates.reason is my memory of the 50s/60s is dimming and i cannot remember who i sailed with but that would be easy with ship names and dates,just a matter of referring to my discharge book.
regards

jim

johnb42
16th July 2009, 23:48
Agree, Alan, that it would be nice to hear from more ex Bank Line people, even an hello and a ship(s) name(s).
I can remember most people I sailed with in the Bank Line, mainly because I was with them for the entirety of a long or longish voyage. We would join en masse and leave the same way.It was a different matter in CP Ships, where, on a four month tour you would usualy sail with two of each rank, as reliefs were staggered.
Sadly, a lot of my peer group from the Bank Line days have probably crossed the bar.

Johnnietwocoats
17th July 2009, 00:25
Sorry to burst your bubble guys. I posted the following Officers and Apprentices crew list for the "Eastbank" July 60 until July 61 in June of this year......
Response.....Abosolutely zilch.......
What did that tell me.....?
That there are a few ex Bankline Chaps on here who only see Banline as a wonderful shipping company. They are obviously looking through rose coloured glasses and folk like myself who challenge their memories are put to the back burner.
I have the full Crew Lists for all my Bank Line Ships but if the response I got from posting this one is anything to go by I don't think I'll waste my time....


Cheap labour........Yup....

See photo of three Apprentices having a Smoke after cleaning the holds of Carbon Black in Lyttellton......Guess we figured there was just a little bit more room in the lungs for a a little more pollution....LOL

For your info.....John Pye, Lefty (Howard) Wright, and Paddy (Dave) Ramsay. My first trip on the Eastbank from July 60 to July 61. I had a great time on that ship....Loved every minute of my first year.....Johnnietwocoats


http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/galler...8/ppuser/31929

BTW. The crew list for the Eastbank that year was as follows.
Master.........R. Lidstone. First trip master I think
Mate............S Mallory
2nd Mate.....M J Arthur
3rd mate.....W. Mclennan
Apps 1........ Dave Ramsay
Apps 2........ H Wright
Apps 3 ....... J Pye
Ch. Eng ...... N harrison
2nd Eng ..... J J Brown
3rd Eng ...... H Nesbitt
4th Eng ...... N A M MacRaild
5th Eng....... K Hill
6th Eng....... A Bell
Lecky.......... R A Todd

Al W
17th July 2009, 01:55
I am one of the Bank Line lurkers on this site. I have only recently found and join the Ship Nostalgia. There is a lot of reading to wade through, it is amazing how much I had forgotteon till I started reading all these posts. I know somewhere I have a box full of slides I took while an app. I just need to find the box and scan the slides. As the memory banks get refreshed, I am sure I have a tale or two to share. Murders, Yellow fever and Bank line Rosie.

LossieBank Dec 1966 - July? 1968
WillowBank 1968 - 1969
Hollybank 1969 - 1970, 2 trips

Alan Rawlinson
17th July 2009, 08:48
To Al W

Many thanks for responding - let's hope we have a snowball effect from many others! Seems the word is still spreading about the excellent SN site.

Johnnietwocoats - I tend to agree that a large proportion of folk - ex Bankline - regard it as a sour experience, not to say nightmare... The life didn't suit everyone. I have a small circle of ex Bankline friends who are not particularly interested in reviving the memories.

If you could adapt successfully, it was a unique experience, and one that got '' into the blood '' so that a few of us never can put it completely behind us.

Cheers//AL

Strath101
17th July 2009, 10:01
My time with the Bankline was in the 1970’s and six-month trips.
From 1974 the ships in order were -
Sprucebank
Shirrabank
Avonbank
Meadowbank
Moraybank – double header
Forthbank
Not a long list compared to some and redundancy in 1979 finished things.

smithax
17th July 2009, 10:27
Found ship nostalgia yesterday.
Also ex Bank line from 1964.
Wavebank - joined in Calcutta just after a collision with a City Line ship
Laurelbank
Lindenbank
Left after my apprenticeship finished and worked ashore about 7 years. Then went back on tankers in 1975 and finally left the sea last year.

My main memories are plenty of "charactors" onboard, visting wonderfull places in the Pacific, counter balanced by Kiddapore(S?) Docks, and roaming the allyways looking for food.

R58484956
17th July 2009, 16:05
Greetings Smithax and a warm welcome to SN on your first posting.Looking forward to some of your stories which you possibly have. Bon voyage.

Billieboy
17th July 2009, 19:49
To Al W

Many thanks for responding - I tend to agree that a large proportion of folk - ex Bankline - regard it as a sour experience, not to say nightmare... The life didn't suit everyone. I have a small circle of ex Bankline friends who are not particularly interested in reviving the memories.
Cheers//AL

I was on a Hain boat, with an ex Bank line Fourth Eng. I remember, that on the way from Japan to Korea, or was it Korea to Formosa?, (it really was a long time ago!), the Cornish Second Eng, (ex RAF), hit him with a right hook, that laid him out on the aft end of four hatch! 'Aggis his name was, came from Glasgow.

johnb42
17th July 2009, 19:54
I was on a Hain boat, with an ex Bank line Fourth Eng. I remember, that on the way from Japan to Korea, or was it Korea to Formosa?, (it really was a long time ago!), the Cornish Second Eng, (ex RAF), hit him with a right hook, that laid him out on the aft end of four hatch! 'Aggis his name was, came from Glasgow.

Just because he was ex Bank Line?/(Jester)

John Hebblewhite
17th July 2009, 19:59
I joined Bank Line in 1963 as apprentice and lasted for 10 years.I know life was not a picnic at times but we got good training and experience on deck especially on the copra runs at least on the ships I was on.

Alistair Macnab
18th July 2009, 00:23
I have held back in contributing to this thread on the basis that since I joined SN I have been one of the steady contributors and also seem to come under the description of seeing Weirs "through rose coloured glasses"!
Believe me, after 29 years I see Bank Line, warts and all!
But.....
Alan Rawlinson's point that there seems to be many more readers than there are contributors is a valid one. There seems to be a substantial Weir contingent out in e-land and it would be great if more of you would come forward and ID yourself, your ships and something about yourself and your yarns. Its the yarns that are the most entertaining, but so are the hard man stories!
Remember your sunsets on the after deeptank hatch at the end of the working day when a beer or a cup of tea and good company made you think that you were in the best place in the world with your best friends!

Alan Rawlinson
18th July 2009, 05:32
Well said Alistair...

Personally, I like to remember the great anticipation in a new port, getting spruced up for a run ashore and the unknown. What a great feeling - getting the muck off as an apprentice, and putting on the No 1 shore gear!
Not knowing what was on the cards - especially in the company of some of the engineer ' hard cases '
AL

jimthehat
18th July 2009, 11:01
Alistair,
can remember sitting on no4 hatch on a warm tropical evening with good mates,have got a slide somewhere ,must try and get it spruced up and then you all can see what a happy bunch wew were (Ettrickbank)
jim

John Campbell
18th July 2009, 11:50
Come to think of it -that hatch- under a starlit tropical sky -homeward bound -after dinner before the 8-12. was a great place - what jokes and yarns we apprentices and engineers shared. Nothing I have experienced since then matches the camaraderie.
Anticipating a new, to us, port was also something to remember and wondering how much of a sub you would put in for or what the old man would let you have.
It was the Second Mates job to get the sub list on many Bankline ships and I remember the hassle when some engineers were subbed to the hilt and we were say in B.A. for three weeks. Going up with the sub list to Capt. Beavis was quite an occasion with many high words spoken.
JC

K urgess
18th July 2009, 12:26
Just to bring a tear to the eye. (Sad)

Weirbank seven bells smoko
Weirbank homeward bound
Sprucebank at Lae and a last walk ashore before leaving for San Francisco
Sprucebank crossing the North Sea Hamburg to Hull viewed from the area mentioned
Weirbank on a quiet evening just before dinner on the way arcross the Pacific

I'm another one like Alastair who remembers the not so good bits but prefers the rose tinted glasses point of view at this point in my history. (Thumb)

China hand
18th July 2009, 13:15
Come to think of it -that hatch- under a starlit tropical sky -homeward bound -after dinner before the 8-12. was a great place - what jokes and yarns we apprentices and engineers shared. Nothing I have experienced since then matches the camaraderie.
Anticipating a new, to us, port was also something to remember and wondering how much of a sub you would put in for or what the old man would let you have.
It was the Second Mates job to get the sub list on many Bankline ships and I remember the hassle when some engineers were subbed to the hilt and we were say in B.A. for three weeks. Going up with the sub list to Capt. Beavis was quite an occasion with many high words spoken.
JC

Oh Yes!

Jim Harris
18th July 2009, 13:35
My memories are all rose tinted, whether it be Bank, Booths or
Souters!(Hippy)

Regards,

Jim.

Charlie Stitt
18th July 2009, 18:48
Kris, in another thread I harped on about the value of a bit of open deck for leisure, your first photo above is a good illustration of this. In later builds when this bit of deck was no longer available, what did you all do? sit cooped up inside getting under each others skins? or move the deckchairs unto No 4 hatch. The big lifejacket locker come summer seat we had on this deck of, Teak,Inver and Forresbank etc was the most popular gathering spot onboard. I just can't imagine life without it(Sad)

K urgess
18th July 2009, 20:54
If you look at the view of the accommodation of the Sprucebank above you'll see there's quite a bit of room on the boatdeck, Charlie.
Unfortunately my Bankline experience is shared between Weir and Spruce so I don't know what the others were like and limited to two and a half years. (Sad)
20% of my seagoing "career".

Trident
19th July 2009, 06:46
It must be my eyes but in the last photo of M.S post 17 I could actualy see the ship or sea moving......Al

Jim Harris
19th July 2009, 07:57
Just to bring a tear to the eye. (Sad)

Weirbank seven bells smoko
Weirbank homeward bound
Sprucebank at Lae and a last walk ashore before leaving for San Francisco
Sprucebank crossing the North Sea Hamburg to Hull viewed from the area mentioned
Weirbank on a quiet evening just before dinner on the way arcross the Pacific

I'm another one like Alastair who remembers the not so good bits but prefers the rose tinted glasses point of view at this point in my history. (Thumb)



Great pictures!

And they didn't just bring a tear to my eye as I nearly drowned
in nostalgia!:sweat:

Image 3: Very poignant for me.

Image 5: Also very poignant for me.

Thanks, Kris.

Regards,

Jim.

johnb42
19th July 2009, 09:34
Nobody got a picture of a cracked liner on deck at No4 hatch, waiting to be dumped? Now that is one that would send me down memory lane. [=P]

Jim Harris
19th July 2009, 10:37
Nobody got a picture of a cracked liner on deck at No4 hatch, waiting to be dumped? Now that is one that would send me down memory lane. [=P]



Cummon, John!

You must have your bi-focals or reading glasses on, and left
your rose tinted ones somewhere!(Thumb)

Regards,

Jim.

rabaul
19th July 2009, 18:29
The 'animal deck' on the Corabank class was the place to relax with a tin of tennants, fosters, south pacific green or brown, tuskers, VB , asahi , Lion , Castle , Michelob, San miguel , or any other cold , gold liquid after a long day on deck or in the engine room - to be found astern of the games room or the deck cadets cabin - sheltered from the rain or the sun it was the only spot to be before hitting the showers and needing to increase your fluid intake.

Charlie Stitt
19th July 2009, 18:46
Ref No4 reply to this thread, I believe Jonnietwocoats should start a thread where he and others who don't have rose tinted glasses can air their grievances in an upstanding fashion. He should give the thread an appropriate clear title so that the faithful can give it a miss if they think it may spoil their day to view the contents.I look forward to hearing some good blood curling stories,the floor's all yours Jonnietwocoats(Applause)

pete
19th July 2009, 19:49
Who remembers carrying Freezer and Cooler containers on deck on passage Europe/Newguinea. Suez closed, 6 weeks at sea, no fridge available so tinnys in the back of container and within 10 minutes...........COLD BEER the DT Hatch. Bliss...............pete

johnb42
19th July 2009, 23:08
Who remembers carrying Freezer and Cooler containers on deck on passage Europe/Newguinea. Suez closed, 6 weeks at sea, no fridge available so tinnys in the back of container and within 10 minutes...........COLD BEER the DT Hatch. Bliss...............pete

Me for one; remember them well from the Elmbank. You just didn't have to get distracted after you'd put your beer in or you'd get a frozen can with the top blown. Too scarce and too valuable to lose, you had to sit and nurse the beer back to liquid form.

johnb42
19th July 2009, 23:20
Cummon, John!

You must have your bi-focals or reading glasses on, and left
your rose tinted ones somewhere!(Thumb)

Regards,

Jim.

The tongue was lodged firmly in cheek with that post, Jim.
It was an art-form though, dumping them at sea. On a very calm day we would make a strop of about six turns of 3" manila, hang the liner over the side with the rope just above the gunwale and then saw through it with a knife (Green River of course (Jester) ) at the end of a manhelp. The skill came in dodging the runner and cargo hook as it whiplashed when the cut rope gave way.
I did this on more than one Bank boat.

johnb42
20th July 2009, 00:58
Ref No4 reply to this thread, I believe Jonnietwocoats should start a thread where he and others who don't have rose tinted glasses can air their grievances in an upstanding fashion. He should give the thread an appropriate clear title so that the faithful can give it a miss if they think it may spoil their day to view the contents.I look forward to hearing some good blood curling stories,the floor's all yours Jonnietwocoats(Applause)

I think there is a distinction between Bank Line as a Company and how people remember their Bank Line time.
I joined Bank Line with no illusions. I knew of them - didn't everyone in the sixties? - but I can't say that they pretended to be anything other than what they were when I joined.
I left Turnbull Scott because they were running low on cargo ships, were going into chemical tankers and I was faced with a longish period on stand-by (half pay), waiting for my next ship.
I wanted to join Smiths of Cardiff at the time, so I went along to Oceanair House in Aldgate to speak to the Union. The man at the Union told me that Smiths usually preferred to take their men locally from Cardiff, so why didn't I try Bank Line. He simply picked up the phone, said I'd be there in 20 minutes or so and that was it.
I was interviewed by Brian Ludlow who told me - "Trips, 5-15 months". "Food, you'll be alright if you like curry and rice". "Do you have your discharge book with you?" "Sorry, no, Mr Ludlow, wasn't really expecting an interview today". "Is it clean"? "Yes". "OK I'll write to you".
A week later I joined the Hazelbank in Tilbury. No fuss, no bullshit.
Without getting sloppy, I did enjoy my time in the Bank Line. The Elmbank wasn't the perfect experience, but perhaps a bit more give and take on both sides would have smoothed that out. The other ships were great and I'm more than pleased to have done it. And hey, my grandsons sit at my knee with wide eyes when I give them a Bank Line story (properly censored of course).
(A)

Johnnietwocoats
20th July 2009, 10:27
Jeez guys......Glad I got a response.
I served my time with Bank Line. Never regretted a minute of it. From 16 years old to 20 I had a ball. In my four years I have figured out I was round the world 5 times. Through thick and thin I did all the things you talk about. I remember dozing off on # 4 hatch in my first passge through Suez on 1960 with a hatch full of limes going South. Loved limes in my beer ever since. I fell in love in the Seychelles. Loved the swimming pool in Calcutta. Loved the Curries every day. Loved the Indian Crew and still say to this day that they were by far the best sailors I ever sailed with.....
Been everywhere all you guys have been, seen all the sunsets you have seen, listened to all the stories, love PNG, loved Suva. loved Australia, new Zealand, BA, Monte, Valpariaso, Galveston, and every other Port you mention.
I served my time. All four years. Didn't act as a 3rd Mate. Didn't get paid AB's wages. Just a Grunt who did his time........
No regrets. But no Rose Coloured Glasses either.
But I got a response. So if you would like me to post all the crews I sailed with, I will. If not......That's OK too. You asked that the lurkers speak up.....I did
To all my Ex Bank Line Shipmates.......Take care. You are definately special....
Johnnietwocoats

Johnnietwocoats
20th July 2009, 10:34
To Al W

Many thanks for responding - let's hope we have a snowball effect from many others! Seems the word is still spreading about the excellent SN site.

Johnnietwocoats - I tend to agree that a large proportion of folk - ex Bankline - regard it as a sour experience, not to say nightmare... The life didn't suit everyone. I have a small circle of ex Bankline friends who are not particularly interested in reviving the memories.

If you could adapt successfully, it was a unique experience, and one that got '' into the blood '' so that a few of us never can put it completely behind us.

Cheers//AL

Alan........I don't remember saying that my Apprenticeship with Bankline was a "sour experience".....Going back to my teenage age years, which was my Apprenticeship, I must say that not knowing any better I had a great time.....
If times were the same I would do it all over again but I must say that certain Masters and Mates took advantage of their jurisdiction over the Apprentices.....JTC

Johnnietwocoats
20th July 2009, 10:42
Ref No4 reply to this thread, I believe Jonnietwocoats should start a thread where he and others who don't have rose tinted glasses can air their grievances in an upstanding fashion. He should give the thread an appropriate clear title so that the faithful can give it a miss if they think it may spoil their day to view the contents.I look forward to hearing some good blood curling stories,the floor's all yours Jonnietwocoats(Applause)

Charlie.......I enjoyed my Apprenticeship with Bankline.....
I wouldn't change my life ever.....
I did what I did and they did what they did because that was the thing to do at the time......
See my other posts regarding my time with Bank Line...
In retrospect perhaps the "Rose Coloured Glasses" was offensive but I think that if all of us were to look back at our time we would realise that all was not "Perfect"....
I was just a child......In todays terms.
I went on to become a Man....I went on to become a Navigator...
I am retired with my memories.....Life is good....
JTC

m shann
20th July 2009, 12:15
I served my time with Bankline 66-69 and enjoyed most of it, the experience gained with the variety of cargoes was fantastic. I remember may hours spent
at the end of the Engineers alleyway ( no4 hatch/ deeptanks ), life seemed to revolve around a case of beer. finished my time at sea Augs90 last 11yrs
Old Man. Still go on ships to-day, but thank God I don't have to sail on them, it aint the same
mike

ianian
20th July 2009, 16:20
Just to bring a tear to the eye. (Sad)

Weirbank seven bells smoko
Weirbank homeward bound
Sprucebank at Lae and a last walk ashore before leaving for San Francisco
Sprucebank crossing the North Sea Hamburg to Hull viewed from the area mentioned
Weirbank on a quiet evening just before dinner on the way arcross the Pacific

I'm another one like Alastair who remembers the not so good bits but prefers the rose tinted glasses point of view at this point in my history. (Thumb)



I see the picture of Paul Yule sailed with him in Stolts he was mate there, a good bloke, now owns and runs a small shop in Devon, new wife and son remember my time on Sprucebank rock dodging as 2/eng Ianian.

Charlie Stitt
21st July 2009, 11:40
Jonnietwocoats, I am pleased to hear that you enjoyed your experiences on Bankboats after all, of course we all had our share of abuse and hard graft. I did'nt mind the hard graft bit but could not stand being messed about, still don't, one example while as Mate on the Forresbank prior to arrival Gulf Ports. Message from Capt Broadley, Fit steam coils in all deeptanks,loading builk lub oil, job done, another message, remove steam coils from all deeptanks, loading drums lub oil, we had no sooner done removing the coils when a third message read, fit coils in all deeptanks loading bulk lub oil. I don't mind remembering this to-day, as I can have a laugh about it,not funny at the time, but now find it quite hilarious so my rose tinted glasses do work a treat, I would'nt be without them. For me the Lascar crews were not the best I sailed with, they would not hold a candle to the crews on the ASN ferries (Thumb)

jimthehat
21st July 2009, 13:05
Ah Charlie,
Now ASN crews north and SE were out of this world.but that must be another thread.
Lascar crews were competent ,But the best were Chinese crews that we had on the clydebank and ettrickbank(I think)

jim

Johnnietwocoats
21st July 2009, 17:29
Jonnietwocoats, I am pleased to hear that you enjoyed your experiences on Bankboats after all, of course we all had our share of abuse and hard graft. I did'nt mind the hard graft bit but could not stand being messed about, still don't, one example while as Mate on the Forresbank prior to arrival Gulf Ports. Message from Capt Broadley, Fit steam coils in all deeptanks,loading builk lub oil, job done, another message, remove steam coils from all deeptanks, loading drums lub oil, we had no sooner done removing the coils when a third message read, fit coils in all deeptanks loading bulk lub oil. I don't mind remembering this to-day, as I can have a laugh about it,not funny at the time, but now find it quite hilarious so my rose tinted glasses do work a treat, I would'nt be without them. For me the Lascar crews were not the best I sailed with, they would not hold a candle to the crews on the ASN ferries (Thumb)

Hi Charlie....I don't remember saying I didn't enjoyed my Apprenticeship with Bank Line. As we all get older we all tend to focus on the Rose Coloured Glasses. Better to remember the good times.
It's a bit like the old ex Master I talked to from Dublin when I was searching for my Grand fathers ship, the "Castlehill" which was bombed and sunk by two German bombers off Dungarvan.
His ship was sunk by Uboats during the war. He survived for days floating on debris.....Yet he only ever wanted to talk about the Good Times......
Regarding the Indian Crews....Most of my career was spent with Indian Crews in Bank Line, Caltex and Texaco. Perhaps I shouldn't have indicated that I was comparing them with other crews.
Perhaps I had the misfortune to sail with one of the worst Masters in Bankline.
Was I scarred for life because of him?,,,,,,,,,,,maybe nicked.
When I think of my apprenticeship he is the first to come to mind....When I get past that I start to get a smile.
Take care
Coats

John Hebblewhite
21st July 2009, 19:51
My ships in Bank Line...
Cederbank 63-64 app
Streambank 64-65 app
Birchbank 65-66 app
Sprucebank 66 app
Teviotbank 67 3/0
Roybank 67-69 3/0
Rowanbank 69 2/0
Weirbank 69-71 2/0
Laganbank 71-72 2/0
Dartbank 72-73 2/0
Then got married and went to Silver Line Chemical Tankers for short voyages.

Charlie Stitt
21st July 2009, 20:30
Yes JTC, There were two Masters in Bank Line who I was aware of at that time to be absolutely impossible and have every sympathy for any unfortunate soul who had to sail with them. One in particular, I was told, if he gave an Officer a good reference then the Company would be very suspicious of that Officer.I bet when these guys were at Home, they were so under their wives thumb,yes dear, no dear, they could'nt get back to sea quick enough to take it out on the crew.(Ouch) Yes life is sometimes a big lottery, I was soooo lucky, and thank my lucky stars.or should that be numbers ? Cheers. CS.

Johnnietwocoats
21st July 2009, 20:55
Yes JTC, There were two Masters in Bank Line who I was aware of at that time to be absolutely impossible and have every sympathy for any unfortunate soul who had to sail with them. One in particular, I was told, if he gave an Officer a good reference then the Company would be very suspicious of that Officer.I bet when these guys were at Home, they were so under their wives thumb,yes dear, no dear, they could'nt get back to sea quick enough to take it out on the crew.(Ouch) Yes life is sometimes a big lottery, I was soooo lucky, and thank my lucky stars.or should that be numbers ? Cheers. CS.

I did 14 months with one of them Charlie.......No pun intended......
He trusted no one. Least of all his Chief Officer.
I used to see him looking out his forward Porthole eating Crackers with cheese and onion during the Second mates afternoon watch. Especially if we were coastwise.
I have the full Crew List for that ship. If anyone is interested.
Take care. Coats

Johnnietwocoats
21st July 2009, 21:19
My ships in Bank Line...
Cederbank 63-64 app
Streambank 64-65 app
Birchbank 65-66 app
Sprucebank 66 app
Teviotbank 67 3/0
Roybank 67-69 3/0
Rowanbank 69 2/0
Weirbank 69-71 2/0
Laganbank 71-72 2/0
Dartbank 72-73 2/0
Then got married and went to Silver Line Chemical Tankers for short voyages.

Hi Jim......
I see from my records that our paths crossed closely even though we have never met. You signed off the Cedarbank at noon on the 6-4-64 in Brisbane for leave with your Family in Townsville. Captain McLean, Master.
I have a full Crew List for the time you were on the Ship.
I joined her on the 5-5-64 in Port Adelaide from the Streambank for repatriation as my time was up.
You joined the Streambank on the 5-5-64 in Melbourne along with Ross McKay and Noel Martin.
Captain Williamson and Syd Mallory, Chief Officer.......
I may have actually met you on the day of transfer....
Cheers
John

PS. I note from my records that Syd mallory took over as Master for a short period of time. Can you let me know what happened to Captain Williamson.

simomatra
27th July 2009, 07:27
Pinebank, Forrestbank, Nairnbank and home on the Cedarbank

All my stuff is in storage so no dates

Cheers Sam

Donald McGhee
2nd August 2009, 06:39
Been a bit busy here in NZ looking at earthquake damage, but have got back to the site and agree that the non response is puzzling. I also find that folk are hard to place as nearly all have a nickname/pen name or whatever they like to call it, as well as very little information regarding who they are inj the profile section.
I have no issues with this at all, as it's a personal choice, just makes it a bit hard to identify folk. Please don't think I'm having a crack at you guys.
Anyway, always great to read about Bank Line in any shape or form; I generally had a good time and look at those times through rose tinted glasses, the bad times, some of them self inflicted I tend to gloss over. After all life is for enjoying, especially when you're fast approaching the 'twilight" of it.
Great site, great people. I sailed on Mara, Inver and Teviot, skippers were Thorne,Peterson and Mitchell respectively. Keep iy up and any ex Donaldson Line (with whom I started my apprenticeship) please don't be in the silent majority. Cheers(Thumb)

ianian
2nd August 2009, 06:56
Agree with you Don as I do not always recognise any body but my name is Ian Shields and the handle is ianian so there is no confussion, regards Ian

K urgess
2nd August 2009, 11:38
Despite the handle anybody that sailed with me will, hopefully, recognise the nutter straight away from the posts and pictures. [=P]

Tony Drury
2nd August 2009, 14:36
Closet bank Liners ehhhh

You are right bank Line is not fairly represented.

I started with Ellermans until they introduced containers and thought (rightly so) that these boats would certainly curtail life and enjoyment so bailed out to Bank Line. Best 4 trips I had:

Beaverbank British 2nd Off 23.03.78 27.08.78
Maplebank British 2nd Off 26.10.78 21.06.79
Cedarbank British 2nd Off 10.12.79 05.03.80
Tenchbank British 2nd Off 21.07.80 20.12.80

And of those the Maplebank comes up trumps. Had a great crew (well mostly so) and even after 9 months volunteered to stay on. Management obviously thought that I (we) were unhinged and we were relieved. Think they sold the old girl shortly afterwards.

Tony Drury (2/0)

SecondLeccie
4th August 2009, 19:47
Hi all, managed 2 trips with Bank Line on Speybank in 1973 (short trip from Lagos to London) and Riverbank's last voyage from Jarrow in 1973 to Singapore to be sold to the Chinese. Glad to see more Bank Line writers and look forward to hearing from someone I met!

brownegaz
13th August 2009, 16:09
Hi Everyone
Im new to the forum, I live in Fremantle Western Australia

I have just joined the forum, I posted the following in "Hello" forum before I found my way here.,

I first went to sea in 1972 on the Springbank as 6th Engineer, joined in Bubury, Clarence Carvalho was Chief, piss head Pete was second, we went to NZ, Panama, UK coast, Antwerp Hamburg etc then out to South Africa and Back to OZ.
Next trip was on Lossiebank joined in Queensland with sugar for St Johns New Brunswick in Canada then US Gulf ports, Mexico and back to OZ, Alec Alderdice was Chief.
Next trip was on Fleetbank joined in Durban, went to Singapore and Japanese coast etc cant remember names on that one although I remeber Ireland was old man.
In 74 I packed the British Merchant service in and sailed on Ozzy coast for a few years then in 79 I went back to Bank Line for two stints as 2nd Engineer, first was on the Crestbank, Alexander Barnes was Chief, a mad Irishman, we tramped all over the globe, joined in Port Kelang then to Taiwan, Japan, Central America, back to Japan, then to Singapore and on to Jeddah then UK coast and then reluctantly paid off in Rouen, the second trip was on Roachbank joined in New York then on regular run between US east coast and US Gulf ports and South Africa, I had my wife and two young kids on these last two voyages.
If anyone has information on these ships or the people who were on them at the time please let me know.

I currently work as Engineer on tug boats in the Port of Fremantle.

I am about to go away for about two weeks so may take some time to reply to any responses.

Thanks for any replies

Gary Browne

Joe C
13th August 2009, 17:01
Alan,many memories,navigating Belmont Circle in an old Hillman!I'm sure we sailed on the Irisbank in the mid fifties,regards,Joe C.

Alan Rawlinson
14th August 2009, 08:27
Greetings Joe!

Last seen chasing rats round the tweendeck, and pumping water for a bath!

Have sent you a private one, AL

Malcolm Darke
14th August 2009, 20:29
Just found 'Ships Nostalgia' and memories came flooding back ..., what a wonderful site ...

I was on the 'Larchbank' May 1972 til December of that year as 2nd Electrical Officer. The master's name was Shackleton. I'll see what pictures and video I can find. I took quite a bit of cine film which I converted to DVD a few years ago, I see if I can post a few clips ...

Found a photo, the guy in the picture is Ted Mitchell (if my memory serves me well) an Australian Engineer, and ex weight lifter

Malc ...

Malcolm Darke
16th August 2009, 18:07
I've found the digital video so I'll sort out some clips of the Larchbank

Malc ...

ps I'm the last person seen in the clip, I was a lot younger then .....

rcraig
17th August 2009, 21:58
With the company for 4 years on the Eastbank, Glenbank (2 original B & W engines one of which seemed to break down every alternate day), Springbank, stewing in the heat in the after cabin in Calcutta and West Africa, and Westbank, sailing out of the UK as acting 3M for the voyage, thereby proving that two year articles could be of considerable advantage for someone (me). The trips were 25 months, nine months and seven months respectively with Captains Holbrook, Stephens, Webb and Williamson.
On my first trip to B.A I discovered what a pizza was. It was made of things including tomato and cheese and filled with gold.
The price, if I remember correctly, which is increasingly highly unlikely, was about three days pay. That and a haircut....it was the last I took there...wiped out a weeks pay, which on looking at my indentures was £1 9s 2p, per week, c. £1.45p to the uninitiated.
I have only just noticed that the sods have not paid me for the share of the 3rd Mates pay when we (the apprentices) were sharing acting 3M for a couple of months during the first trip!!
3rd Mate on the Westbank was the only time in my working life when I was on overtime. I strongly recommend it. I still remember the pleasure of not being given certain jobs because it would cost 5/6 per hour. And, being an Aberdonian, the lack of certain jobs because I lost 5/6 per hour.
The memories and the experiences are and were unique.
But they don't include sitting on hatches in the setting sun quaffing beer. The first trip was remarkably dry and sipping cold water even was not one of the pleasures available to us. I think there was one domestic type fridge and that was for the use of the Old Man.
Boredom was a major factor when working days at sea.
But the guys you met, and the places we went, and the humorous and otherwise events were to prove almost unique.
I went on to Peckston's of Stockton on Tees for the experience of coasters..who? you might well ask, BTC for the experience of tankers, yuk, Elder Dempsters for 2 years...probably the only European who enjoyed the West African coast, then the army for 16 yrs with 6 years commanding LCT's (only 1000 tons but a crew of 36) and a pile of other jobs, before doing 3 years with Wimpey Marine as mate and master on anchor handling supply vessels in the North Sea latterly relieving while at university doing law.
And throughout that time ludicrous as it may seem, and in almost indefinable ways at times, that 4 year stint with Bank Line was of surprising benefit.
I have only ever met two of those I sailed with, Gordon Bruce with whom I shared a cabin for 25 months and died at 55, and a third engineer whom I met in Belfast in my army days whose life had been dominated by a certain part of his anatomy, usually staggering back shattered in the early and often late hours of the morning. There was only one thing on his mind and that was also located in the same part of his anatomy.
A memory which many may identify with. The Glenbank had a major refit in Belfast(?). That refit did not include pumps for the water supply for the midships accommodation. And Oct 1954 was in modern times. Well, they were in 1954. And we were not amused to work the after hand pump to fill up 2 x 5 gallon drums every morn, noon ...can't remember night times...and carry them all the way up to the tanks at the top of the midships accommodation for half an hour each time for people to get their showers.
So we arrived on the Aussie coast where the 2M recounted the situation to a beer bellied Aussie docker. He was scandalised. The dockers' union blacked the ship on the coast within hours.
My recollection is that the pumps were installed within 48 hours. Only 30 years on.
Alas, after that I could only curse the shore unions. They never seemed to strike when I was in port. Only when I wanted to get into port and usually wanting home.

jimthehat
17th August 2009, 22:28
carrying the 5 gall drums every morning from the aft peak to midships,was as you say an experience that many had to do ,we apps on the Clydebank did that for 18 months in 55/56,it was not seen as a chore but something that worked up an appetite before breakfast,we were on the far east run so did not have to contend with bolshy oz dockers.

JIM

Johnnietwocoats
18th August 2009, 03:32
carrying the 5 gall drums every morning from the aft peak to midships,was as you say an experience that many had to do ,we apps on the Clydebank did that for 18 months in 55/56,it was not seen as a chore but something that worked up an appetite before breakfast,we were on the far east run so did not have to contend with bolshy oz dockers.

JIM

I have a great respect for the Bolshie Oz Dockers........Put the Masters and Mates in their place and ensured that Apprentices were not treated like the proverbial Shite, at least when on the Aussie Coast........Solidarity Forever and all that.........(Smoke)

rcraig
18th August 2009, 09:42
Yes, the dockers had their advantages. However, arriving at Darwin....paradise lost (oh aye!!) with the remains of a sulphur cargo on, I think, the Westbank, we were overjoyed to get a berth alongside for Christmas day till a very pot bellied Aussie-Italian docker argued that the people of Darwin were starving, that the ship anchored offshore had oranges and other vital food on board and we finished up sailing back to Cairns to discharge.
Increasingly as I go through these reminiscences I find myself double checking mentally if the details are accurate. Sulphur for Darwin?! Sulphur for a hell-hole? Coals for Newcastle?
Whatever, they did not want our cargo enough.

Abbeywood.
18th August 2009, 16:10
Sorry to burst your bubble guys. I posted the following Officers and Apprentices crew list for the "Eastbank" July 60 until July 61 in June of this year......
Response.....Abosolutely zilch.......
What did that tell me.....?
That there are a few ex Bankline Chaps on here who only see Banline as a wonderful shipping company. They are obviously looking through rose coloured glasses and folk like myself who challenge their memories are put to the back burner.
I have the full Crew Lists for all my Bank Line Ships but if the response I got from posting this one is anything to go by I don't think I'll waste my time....


Cheap labour........Yup....

See photo of three Apprentices having a Smoke after cleaning the holds of Carbon Black in Lyttellton......Guess we figured there was just a little bit more room in the lungs for a a little more pollution....LOL

For your info.....John Pye, Lefty (Howard) Wright, and Paddy (Dave) Ramsay. My first trip on the Eastbank from July 60 to July 61. I had a great time on that ship....Loved every minute of my first year.....Johnnietwocoats


http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/galler...8/ppuser/31929

BTW. The crew list for the Eastbank that year was as follows.
Master.........R. Lidstone. First trip master I think
Mate............S Mallory
2nd Mate.....M J Arthur
3rd mate.....W. Mclennan
Apps 1........ Dave Ramsay
Apps 2........ H Wright
Apps 3 ....... J Pye
Ch. Eng ...... N harrison
2nd Eng ..... J J Brown
3rd Eng ...... H Nesbitt
4th Eng ...... N A M MacRaild
5th Eng....... K Hill
6th Eng....... A Bell
Lecky.......... R A Todd

I was in the 'Eastbank' June 1963 until November 1963. My first trip with Bank Line. Joined in Greenock, as 4th Eng' and out on the Pacific Islands run.
Darwin,Port Moresby, Samarai Island, Lae, Madang, Wewak, Kavieng, Rabaul, and Honiara. Back to Rabaul to load the liquid gold, (Coconut Oil). and copra.
Very nice around the Islands, if you were a passenger or on deck but the humidity was certainly not beneficial in the Engine-room.
I have always thought that we were in the Red Sea when Pres' J.F.Kennedy was shot but refering to my Discharge Book, I see that I signed off in Liverpool on the 27th November. and the Eastbank certainly was no ocean greyhound.
Regards to all retired 'Bankies' of my era, Pete' Lambert

Joe C
28th August 2009, 17:49
Greetings Joe!

Last seen chasing rats round the tweendeck, and pumping water for a bath!

Have sent you a private one, AL

Alan,still finding my way around the site,dredging memory for notable events.I've been following the "wet-ship,dry-ship" exchanges.On the Irisbank we had to go elsewhere for a dram.Remember our introduction to Scandinavian drinking style when we visited the Heoch Silverwave in Calcutta!Can't remember the following day though and did'nt eat the sardine sarnies when we returned to the ship.Regards

Alan Rawlinson
28th August 2009, 20:53
Hi Joe,

Had forgotten that one, but you have jogged my memory! Can recall that Scandinavian evening in a hazy sort of way. Have kept off of this particular thread, more in amazement than anything else, after reading about the comforts of in built bars on later vessels.

Cheers/Alan

Joe C
29th August 2009, 15:34
=Alan Rawlinson;353966]Hi Joe,
Alan, if I can revive the memory thing,your greatest ambition at this stage in your maritime career was to make a "roll-your-own"cigarette with one hand,cowboy style.I can't remember why but it must have been important,perhaps Calcutta was getting to us,whenever we dry docked on the Irisbank we ended up in Calcutta,at least on the Levernbank we drydocked in Japan.Mind you that was not without its dangers as the shore facilities included Japanese baths with steam coils to keep them very hot I recall a fellow apprentice coming away with some interesting scars in an interesting place.I'll bet he's been explaining them away for many years.Joe Coghill......
Had forgotten that one, but you have jogged my memory! Can recall that Scandinavian evening in a hazy sort of way. Have kept off of this particular thread, more in amazement than anything else, after reading about the comforts of in built bars on later vessels.

Cheers/Alan[/QUOTE]

Ben Masey
29th August 2009, 15:54
[Perhaps they are the sdame silent majority who do not attend the biennial reunionns or join the Bank Line association.
Answers to many of the questions submitted to this forum can be found there.
eg about Stan Sweeney;Stan aways writes a letter of apology to the reunion,apologising for his absence and saying how he is etc.
Farquhar McKenzie and I always spend the dinner at the reunion together.
Peter Simpson is always there.

To get details of next meeting contact;
brianlucy@btinternet.com QUOTE=Alan Rawlinson;341199]It must have occurred to readers of these threads that the number of viewings compared to postings on the Bankline sub category is quite a high ratio. Also, a good proportion of the viewings are likely to be by ex Bankline staff who, for some reason, stay silent. ( I know, - many think we are all talking twaddle!)

Someone earlier was calculating the numbers of seagoing staff at peak times, based on 50 plus ships steaming around the globe at any one time. Allowing for the natural turnover of staff, it still adds up to several thousand ex members. Some that I know can't handle the technology - some never use the internet etc etc, but there is still a large number of individuals who will have thoughts - good or bad - and fascinating stories of the Bankline days that we would all enjoy reading.

Seriously, it would be great to have postings from a wider number than the 2 dozen or so stalwarts......

Let's hear it from the silent majority - please!

AL[/QUOTE]

Ben Masey
29th August 2009, 16:03
Perhaps they are the same silent majority who do not join the Bank Line Association and read their newsletter.
In the few days since I have joined SN I can answer a few questions on the forum:
Farquhar MacKenzie,still lives in Dornie,I spent the last few reunion dinners with him.
Peter Simpson and his wife still attend.
Stan Sweeney always writes a letter apologising for his absence.

For details;
brianlucy@btinternet

rcraig
29th August 2009, 16:08
Bars, in built or otherwise. What a soft life you guys must have led!
As an apprentice on the Eastbank I can remember only too well, the smoke room empty. Nobody ever gathered there. There was certainly no drink. Nor cold water.
There was a library on board which consisted of deadly dull books from the various missions we met up with.
We had a short wave radio controlled from the wireless room. Listening to the football score was often an exercise in frustration. As the ship rolled so did the reception vary, depending on where we were.
Sometimes only the atmospherics were clear. .........Aberdeen.. chww?8''#,
Rangers 43, leaving you sometimes to wait for the papers in Durban or wherever, to see if Aberdeen had actually lost.
Gordon Bruce joined the ship with me complete with a superb short wave radio
plugging it in with great anticipation. Alas it was an AC set and promptly expired.
I can't actually remember if we even had a canteen flogging chocolates or anything else for that matter.
Mind you we would have been under age in any event and I doubt if we could have afforded drink.

Charlie Stitt
29th August 2009, 19:08
Ah come on Ray, remember that lovely glass of COOL lime juice we got. Yes you have brought back the memory of the smoke room on the ''Westbank'' in my case, it had the atmosphere of a morgue, and that was with a good crowd of shipmates.

rcraig
29th August 2009, 19:31
Cool lime juice? Sure you weren't a director's son?.

As I mentioned before, we had a prolonged spell without sugar and the next time I tasted that was taking it back on the surf boats with ED's. 'Twas like nectar of sulphuric acid, without the sweetness.

Ray

John Campbell
29th August 2009, 20:15
Cool lime juice? Sure you weren't a director's son?.

As I mentioned before, we had a prolonged spell without sugar and the next time I tasted that was taking it back on the surf boats with ED's. 'Twas like nectar of sulphuric acid, without the sweetness.

Ray

Yes I too have slurped the unsweetned variety of lime juice as we slaved away trying to get those dreaded deep tank lids water tight using useless spanners and bolts in order toload lube oil for Aussie Coast.
Then getting into Galveston and down came the Texans with pneumatic spanners and those tasks were peanuts to those fellows.
JC

karan "shipmate"
29th August 2009, 22:57
It must have occurred to readers of these threads that the number of viewings compared to postings on the Bankline sub category is quite a high ratio. Also, a good proportion of the viewings are likely to be by ex Bankline staff who, for some reason, stay silent. ( I know, - many think we are all talking twaddle!)

Someone earlier was calculating the numbers of seagoing staff at peak times, based on 50 plus ships steaming around the globe at any one time. Allowing for the natural turnover of staff, it still adds up to several thousand ex members. Some that I know can't handle the technology - some never use the internet etc etc, but there is still a large number of individuals who will have thoughts - good or bad - and fascinating stories of the Bankline days that we would all enjoy reading.

Seriously, it would be great to have postings from a wider number than the 2 dozen or so stalwarts......

Let's hear it from the silent majority - please!

AL

Hello there , my father was bankline staff, sadly he passed recently but i have details of his ships and dates if anyone remembers him.
He was hugh james or jim bailie 2nd electrician.
Here's hoping
karan

McMorine
1st September 2009, 10:30
It would be very helpfull if ex Bankline Staff used their real names, thereby jogging people's memories more easily, or have they got something to hide?
Alex McMorine, known as Mac. Twenty years as Electrician.

K urgess
1st September 2009, 11:17
That's a matter of personal choice, Alex.
None of us who have usernames have got anything to hide but prefer to remain anonymous.
Besides if you really sailed with me you would know who I was straight away.
I've deleted your duplicate post by the way because there is no need for repetition.

rcraig
1st September 2009, 12:27
John

I'd forgotten about that! Forgotten about what? Hell, I' ve forgotten what I thought I had remembered I had forgotten about.

Yes, the deep tanks. These lids had a mind of their own. As fast as you tightened them up the bloody nuts elsewhere slacked off. It took forever to do.
We had been told that if you fell into a tank of oil you would sink to the bottom because of the SG of the palm oil. This was a matter of some dread as we walked in the narrow space between the tanks on the Eastbank/Westbank vessels when the tanks were lidless.
Never did work that one out.
Along with the tanks recollection is the fond memory of the presence of copra bugs everywhere....unlike some others they are associated in my mind with sparkling seas, South sea islands, beautiful maidens, Kavieng, Rabaul....eh, I think I'm wandering again...something wrong there.

ianian
1st September 2009, 13:31
It would be very helpfull if ex Bankline Staff used their real names, thereby jogging people's memories more easily, or have they got something to hide?
Alex McMorine, known as Mac. Twenty years as Electrician.

I agree with you that people should give there proper names, it gets somewhat confusing, as you say have they got something to hide, at the very least they should put there correct name in there profile.

Ianian

McMorine
1st September 2009, 14:06
When you are in your early seventies as Iam, ones memory gets a little vague and I'm sure there are a lot of older members than me.

rcraig
1st September 2009, 15:26
I can understand why it might help to have names on the profile although it would hardly help me with my memory! But there can be good reasons for using a pseudonym.
It may help to create more difficulty in gaining access to your computer for the wrong reasons although some one more computer literate than I can say whether or not I'm talking codswallop.
I have more than enough spams offering Viagra (totally and absolutely not needed, of course!) and fortunes from benefactors in Nigeria without encouraging more.

Al W
1st September 2009, 20:14
When you are in your early seventies as Iam, ones memory gets a little vague and I'm sure there are a lot of older members than me.


Mac... If I remember correctly, your memory got a little vague at times way back then in certain ports.

as per suggestions... Signature added.

Donald McGhee
1st September 2009, 22:00
I can understand why it might help to have names on the profile although it would hardly help me with my memory! But there can be good reasons for using a pseudonym.
It may help to create more difficulty in gaining access to your computer for the wrong reasons although some one more computer literate than I can say whether or not I'm talking codswallop.
I have more than enough spams offering Viagra (totally and absolutely not needed, of course!) and fortunes from benefactors in Nigeria without encouraging more.

This almost manic desire to sell Viagra and other things such as willie extending methods is a constant and bloody annoying thing, as well as the phony diploma trade coupled with Nigerian money scams. Dont ya just love technology? Still, I could possibly be a well endowed, highly qualified, rich and permanently erect person if I replied eh?(Pint)

McMorine
2nd September 2009, 13:41
Don't know what you mean Alistair, work hard and play hard in those happy days eh? Have sent you a private message with my e-mail address.(K)

McMorine
5th September 2009, 16:17
To Al W

Many thanks for responding - let's hope we have a snowball effect from many others! Seems the word is still spreading about the excellent SN site.

Johnnietwocoats - I tend to agree that a large proportion of folk - ex Bankline - regard it as a sour experience, not to say nightmare... The life didn't suit everyone. I have a small circle of ex Bankline friends who are not particularly interested in reviving the memories.

If you could adapt successfully, it was a unique experience, and one that got '' into the blood '' so that a few of us never can put it completely behind us.

Cheers//AL
I spent twenty very happy years with Bankline and would do it all again in that era.

China hand
5th September 2009, 18:30
But the last says it all, does it not; in THAT era.
I agree wholeheartedly.

Alan Rawlinson
12th February 2010, 11:28
It must have occurred to readers of these threads that the number of viewings compared to postings on the Bankline sub category is quite a high ratio. Also, a good proportion of the viewings are likely to be by ex Bankline staff who, for some reason, stay silent. ( I know, - many think we are all talking twaddle!)

Someone earlier was calculating the numbers of seagoing staff at peak times, based on 50 plus ships steaming around the globe at any one time. Allowing for the natural turnover of staff, it still adds up to several thousand ex members. Some that I know can't handle the technology - some never use the internet etc etc, but there is still a large number of individuals who will have thoughts - good or bad - and fascinating stories of the Bankline days that we would all enjoy reading.

Seriously, it would be great to have postings from a wider number than the 2 dozen or so stalwarts......



Let's hear it from the silent majority - please!

AL

I get the feeling that there are many ' Bankline Association members out there that don't use ( spurn?) SN but I don't know the reason. It can't be lack of IT or computer skills, because they seem to email each other OK. Hope it's not a ' them and us ' situation, but there again, worse things happen at sea!

Perhaps someone could arrange for the virtues ( or otherwise) of this site, to be highlighted in the newsletter?

Andy Whittle
12th February 2010, 11:56
Apprentice on Rosebank with Capt Jack Donald 1967
Inverbank 1968
Yewbank 1969 on Far East run - fantastic. captain was WW Davis
Shirrabank
Rowanbank
What a great way to go to sea. Never enjoyed any other Company as much.
Still at sea on a supply vessel in India.
Very happy memories, have very much enjoyed the stories on this site, especially about the Copra run. I have often thought how lucky we were to have experienced all of these things. Seafaring nowadays is usually pretty grim.
Keep the stories coming
Kind regards
Andy Whittle

dick burrow
12th February 2010, 16:19
I joined rosebank in liverpool november 1967 as first trip appy, jack donald was old man round coast then he paid off and john sturgess took over.the mate said to me " if you,ve stuck it out with jack donald you,ll cope with anything" he certainly was a strange guy, john sturgess was completely opposite, a true gent!

Alistair Macnab
13th February 2010, 18:10
Jack Donald was the Mate on my first trip to sea on the "Fleetbank" maiden voyage in 1953. He was particularly grim and had in mind a duty to beat something into or out of apprentices. We spent two years but survived all his game playing and dirty tricks. Often plotted his early demise, but never did anything about it! Believe he had been passed over for command several times and he knew it.
When I was super in New Orleans many years later, he arrived as Master with Mrs. Donald with him. By this time he had settled down and I believe that his wife was a good influence on his personality and character. Now technically being his boss, I had visions of getting my own back but thoughtfully restrained my worst instincts.
Only in Bank Line!

Donald McGhee
13th February 2010, 22:49
Apprentice on Rosebank with Capt Jack Donald 1967
Inverbank 1968
Yewbank 1969 on Far East run - fantastic. captain was WW Davis
Shirrabank
Rowanbank
What a great way to go to sea. Never enjoyed any other Company as much.
Still at sea on a supply vessel in India.
Very happy memories, have very much enjoyed the stories on this site, especially about the Copra run. I have often thought how lucky we were to have experienced all of these things. Seafaring nowadays is usually pretty grim.
Keep the stories coming
Kind regards
Andy Whittle

Still there Chop? You must be a real glutton for punishment. Not many can stay at sea for as long as you have! When are you coming to NZ to visit me?

Don

Johnnietwocoats
13th February 2010, 23:22
I joined rosebank in liverpool november 1967 as first trip appy, jack donald was old man round coast then he paid off and john sturgess took over.the mate said to me " if you,ve stuck it out with jack donald you,ll cope with anything" he certainly was a strange guy, john sturgess was completely opposite, a true gent!

Was John Sturgess a blondish chap with a beard. Did he have his wife with him.
I am thinking he was mate on the Cedarbank in 64 when I was Senior Apprentice at the end of my time on the way home?
TC

dick burrow
14th February 2010, 11:46
Aye Johnnie, he was that man, and he had three kids with him aswell. treated us appys like people and not dogs like Jack Donald.

Johnnietwocoats
14th February 2010, 18:03
Aye Johnnie, he was that man, and he had three kids with him aswell. treated us appys like people and not dogs like Jack Donald.

He was a great Mate. As you say he treated apprentices very well. I think I have a photo of him somewhere when we were transiting th Panama Canal on the way home.
Hope I can find it....
Johnny(Smoke)

JOHNKITTO
23rd February 2010, 15:28
Re post #57 I agree with the comments regarding the Ozzie Dockers. We had been working cargo all day and the Head stevedore asked us if we would put the hatch covers on after the wharfies had left and promised us 25.00 dollars. We did as we were bid and heard no more. The following morning he came aboard and asked if we had got our cash and when we said we hadn't he went straight to the mate (who hadn't had time to spend it) took it off him and gave it to us.

Hugh Ferguson
23rd February 2010, 17:53
Quote, "Where's the silent majority?" The only two Bank Line people I knew were brothers and both in the same pilot service as myself: they were Jimmy and Davis Lesley and they both died many years ago. I wonder if any remember either of them?

McMorine
24th February 2010, 10:53
Surely more Bank Line sea going staff had cameras when they were at sea, where are all the photos? They can't all be too old to climb up into their lofts and dig them out!!!!!!!!

Winebuff
24th February 2010, 17:13
Surely more Bank Line sea going staff had cameras when they were at sea, where are all the photos? They can't all be too old to climb up into their lofts and dig them out!!!!!!!!

Don't you believe it.

Not even sure where the loft is most days.

I was fortunate to see the Great Wall of China whilst loading coal in Chingwantoa (?) Northern China, also a wonderful visit up the Red Sea to Elate (Jordan) was only when I got back I found there was no film in the camera.

Went back to the wall - with film - a couple of years later.

Senility sets in early when you spend your life on the 12-4 ER watch.

Peter Smith
Bank Line 74-84[=P]

rcraig
24th February 2010, 19:44
Surely more Bank Line sea going staff had cameras when they were at sea, where are all the photos? They can't all be too old to climb up into their lofts and dig them out!!!!!!!!

I cannot remember anyone using a camera apart from myself, in the early '50's over a 4 year period. The relevant bit in that sentence is of course that I cannot remember. And good cameras in those days were not cheap relative to wages.
But it is such a pity that there are not that many photographs around.
Mind you, putting films off for developing in the '50's could be fraught with problems. Kodachrome (25 ASA eg) required you in Australia to send off the pre-paid films to one source in Australia and second guess where to get them sent back to, or alternatively send them to the UK for developing to get them perhaps several months later on your return there.
If you were an apprentice you simply could not afford either the colour film or the camera. My camera was a 1930's Box Brownie (we wuz poor in them days) and after it finished up in the sea having rusted the bits in the tropics I was reprimanded by my mother on return.
I have eg., no shots of my trip on the Springbank because all of the films taken in Australia and Mauritius were sent ashore for developing and we sailed without getting them back from the shop and those in West Africa were also lost there. Always suffered from the impatience of wanting them done immediately!

duquesa
24th February 2010, 20:28
Elate! (Eilat) I was sent to join a ship there once. Think you will find its in Israel though. (*))

McMorine
24th February 2010, 21:55
Maybe I was one of the fortunate ones, being on the Orient/Africa run in the early '60s. I was able to purchase a reasonably decent camera in Japan quite cheeply. Also, being on a regular run, for two years, it was possible to use Kodak Colour Slide film, the price of processing being included in the purchase price and we new which ports we were going to, so the slides would be there on arrival. Can't remember any going astray.
When I was on the Sprucebank '64/65 for fifteen months, a few of us were interested in photography, so we got together and purchased a film developing tank, enlarger and all the relevant chemicals for black and white 35mm film. Hence a lot of my photos are black and white. We did have a lot of failures, but got quite good at it eventually and it was good fun. Although I'm in my early seventies, I can still remember all that very clearly. (My first camera was a '50s Box Brownie and was ashamed to be seen using it on my first trip, don't know why)

Alan Rawlinson
25th February 2010, 07:56
Maybe I was one of the fortunate ones, being on the Orient/Africa run in the early '60s. I was able to purchase a reasonably decent camera in Japan quite cheeply. Also, being on a regular run, for two years, it was possible to use Kodak Colour Slide film, the price of processing being included in the purchase price and we new which ports we were going to, so the slides would be there on arrival. Can't remember any going astray.
When I was on the Sprucebank '64/65 for fifteen months, a few of us were interested in photography, so we got together and purchased a film developing tank, enlarger and all the relevant chemicals for black and white 35mm film. Hence a lot of my photos are black and white. We did have a lot of failures, but got quite good at it eventually and it was good fun. Although I'm in my early seventies, I can still remember all that very clearly. (My first camera was a '50s Box Brownie and was ashamed to be seen using it on my first trip, don't know why)

We developed and printed our own film in a basic way on the Maplebank in the early 50's, turning the '' Iron Lung '' cabin into a dark room which wasn't difficult, given the gloomy location! It was fellow apprentice John Beale I have to thank for a lifelong keen interest in photography, and my Avatar above (steering the Maplebank from the upper bridge) was an early effort at on board developing. In the Bankline days I relied on a Kodak retinette 1b, which was a brilliant camera lasting me for some 15 years, followed by a whole string of all types including medium format Hasselblad costing thousands.... After too many house moves, the pics are scattered far and wide, but I do still have unpacked boxes in the garage!

rcraig
25th February 2010, 08:27
Maybe I was one of the fortunate ones, being on the Orient/Africa run in the early '60s. I was able to purchase a reasonably decent camera in Japan quite cheeply. Also, being on a regular run, for two years, it was possible to use Kodak Colour Slide film, the price of processing being included in the purchase price and we new which ports we were going to, so the slides would be there on arrival. Can't remember any going astray.
When I was on the Sprucebank '64/65 for fifteen months, a few of us were interested in photography, so we got together and purchased a film developing tank, enlarger and all the relevant chemicals for black and white 35mm film. Hence a lot of my photos are black and white. We did have a lot of failures, but got quite good at it eventually and it was good fun. Although I'm in my early seventies, I can still remember all that very clearly. (My first camera was a '50s Box Brownie and was ashamed to be seen using it on my first trip, don't know why)

Your recent photos show some clear sharp black and white shots and my memory has been jogged a bit. I remember looking at cameras like Voigtlander, and the Agfa Silette in S. Africa but spending for weeks ahead on an apprentice's pay seemed too much. Pity!

rcraig
25th February 2010, 08:28
Alan, get these photos unpacked at once and let's see them. Time is running out!

Winebuff
25th February 2010, 11:35
Elate! (Eilat) I was sent to join a ship there once. Think you will find its in Israel though. (*))

Thank you, geography was never my strong point.
And in truth it was Aqaba on the other side of the border not Eilat. As it is too deep to anchor we spent weeks drifting back and forth. Every time we drifted in towards the Israeli waters they would call up and tell us to move on. Couple of interesting discussions with some of our fellow drifters who were a bit slow off the mark. Amazing what power of persuasion an armed gun boat has on reluctant Greek ships masters.

We had 1000's of truck tyres from Japan for Iraq but could not go into the Gulf due to the Iraq/Iran war being in full flood. It took weeks to off load as they all had to be loaded into barges, put onto trucks and shipped out to Iraq, then we had to wait while the empty trucks came back for more.

Peter Smith
Bank Line 74-84[=P]

bri445
25th February 2010, 16:35
After too many house moves, the pics are scattered far and wide, but I do still have unpacked boxes in the garage!

(EEK) Please get them out of the garage! It's the worst possible place to 'store' them. The average garage varies through cold/frost/hot, damp/dry, in the course of a year. The best place, if you're allowed, is in the wardrobe in the spare bedroom!
Bri

rcraig
25th February 2010, 17:48
(EEK) Please get them out of the garage! It's the worst possible place to 'store' them. The average garage varies through cold/frost/hot, damp/dry, in the course of a year. The best place, if you're allowed, is in the wardrobe in the spare bedroom!
Bri

No, No. The best place is to scan them and put them on site for us to see!

jimthehat
26th February 2010, 21:01
finding 50s photos is proving a difficult task,only came up with one so far ,but have discovered a few slides,so if I dont have a special tool attached to my printer,how do get prints from them???
jim

Alan Rawlinson
27th February 2010, 09:06
No, No. The best place is to scan them and put them on site for us to see!

OK Ray, Found a few......

first one - Irisbank, Bethal ( Sparky), Yours truly,Paddy Walsh(Lecky) Jim Scobbie (2/0 and nephew of God - Oops, sorry, Capt Scobbie, in the London Office)

next - Healey Martin ( 3/0) and J Farringdon ( 2/0) on the boatdeck of the Southbank. Both destined to be Bankline Masters.

last - The elephant mentioned earlier on the Irisbank,walking up an improvised gangway ( hatchboards) with Capt Palmer looking on in his pith helmet.

rcraig
27th February 2010, 10:08
Time capsules, Alan. Little did any of us know what lay ahead.
Poor old elephant...what went on in his mind as he walked the plank, I wonder!

rcraig
27th February 2010, 10:21
Jimthehat

I was hoping that someone who knew what he was talking about would give you the answer, so I hung back.
You would need either a dedicated scanner which takes only say, slides etc., and save them to the computer, but they can be very expensive and not really worth it unless you are a dedicated photographer.
Alternatively a scanner which in addition to taking photos, can take slides etc., using the appropriate plastic fittings. Then of course, save and print/download as wanted. I use this type.
There is one being touted in newspapers which appears to take only slides at £99 which would do the same but I have not seen results and the costs are not quite what they appear when you add in bits and pieces.
I hold my shots in Picasa which is free software downloaded thru the net and allows you to tidy up shots easily (crop, straighten up, contrast and so on) without too much time or skill needed.
Apologies if I am teaching you to suck eggs!

jimthehat
27th February 2010, 11:42
Jimthehat

I was hoping that someone who knew what he was talking about would give you the answer, so I hung back.
You would need either a dedicated scanner which takes only say, slides etc., and save them to the computer, but they can be very expensive and not really worth it unless you are a dedicated photographer.
Alternatively a scanner which in addition to taking photos, can take slides etc., using the appropriate plastic fittings. Then of course, save and print/download as wanted. I use this type.
There is one being touted in newspapers which appears to take only slides at £99 which would do the same but I have not seen results and the costs are not quite what they appear when you add in bits and pieces.
I hold my shots in Picasa which is free software downloaded thru the net and allows you to tidy up shots easily (crop, straighten up, contrast and so on) without too much time or skill needed.
Apologies if I am teaching you to suck eggs!
Thanks for that,food for thought will go thru my hp user guide and see if the C6280 can do slides.
jim

K urgess
27th February 2010, 12:27
You need a reasonable optical scanning resolution for slides, Jim.
Combination units (scanners/copiers/printers) don't usually have enough resolution. I say optical resolution because most scanners will say they can scan up to some phenomenal resolution but its digitally enhanced above the reolution of the sensor. Mine's 4800 and gives good sized scans of slides.
A lot of recent scanners either come with adaptors or they can be bought as extras.
It is possible to project the slides using a projector and then photograph the screen but there's usually some loss around the edges and it's very difficult to get it square.
I managed to scan a slide without using my slide attachment by relying on the reflection from the white pressure pad showing through the slide. Not as bright as using the special light but reasonable results.
Cheers
Kris

johnmilne
27th February 2010, 12:56
Alan, I sailed with Healeywhen he was 2nd Mate on Lindenbank when he paid off he was sitting for Masters(1968) Next and last time I saw him was in New Plymouth as master of Ivybank(had his wife Mildred with him) To me he was a very capable man when Second Mate and it didn't surprise me when the then Harbour Master Captain Flett told me who the master was.
John Milne

Alan Rawlinson
27th February 2010, 13:40
Alan, I sailed with Healeywhen he was 2nd Mate on Lindenbank when he paid off he was sitting for Masters(1968) Next and last time I saw him was in New Plymouth as master of Ivybank(had his wife Mildred with him) To me he was a very capable man when Second Mate and it didn't surprise me when the then Harbour Master Captain Flett told me who the master was.
John Milne

Hallo John ( in fabulous Brissy)
Greetings from Falmouth, Cornwall...

Great to get your memories of Healey - He came down to see me when he was sitting Master's, - I was Mate of the '' Duke of Lancaster '' in Belfast. Here is a snap of him when he was apprentice/3/0 on the Southbank 1960. (left to right) self,Healey,apprentice,Sparky,Junior Apprentice. We stayed in touch through to the end of the 80's . No2 is in the alleyway, alongside Harmony St Wharf ( with plaques on the quayside) 2/0,John Farringdon, 3/o (name escapes me) and Apprentice (ditto)
The ' Hula ' snap is Sparky in working kit ( Pacific version)

Charlie Stitt
27th February 2010, 16:49
Jim, all the photos in my gallery were scanned by me, some from old photos, and some from old slides. Using an Epson perfection V300 photo scanner. You can buy one from the AMAZON WEBSITE for £74 delivered to your door. This scanner also scans documents . I am more than happy with my one.

jimthehat
27th February 2010, 23:03
I am getting jealous,why is it that almost everyone on this site has met up with old shipmates/i have not met up with anyone who waere shipmates between 1952-1966,went to school with Alan ,but that is the nearest i have come,so where are you all?

MAPLEBANK..25/8/52-26/1/54
ETIVEBANK..23/254-17/3/55
CLYDEBANK..4/4/55-6/8/56
EASTBANK..7/8/56-2/11/56
ISIPINGO..16/9/57-8/6/59
FLEETBANK..10/6/59-13/7/59
ETTRICKBANK..15/12/59-19/12/61
FORRESBANK..29/5/62-19/12/63
TAYBANK14/8/64-12/1/66
THAT WAS ME THEN OFF TO FERRIES AND A GIRLFRIEND.

JIM.

Billieboy
28th February 2010, 07:00
Just because he was ex Bank Line?/(Jester)

Probably John, the second was a pig though.

Steve Harper
1st March 2010, 15:39
Does anyone know what happened to the Gleadhill brothers?
I sailed with Sid when he was mate on the Willowbank (1973) and his brother Norman when he was 2/O on the Testbank (1977ish)
Also, an Aussie C/O Tony Spencer who I last saw on the Ivybank 1979

southbankelder
1st March 2010, 19:58
[captain carney, was master she sank entring tarawa third mate was killed
second engineer came from bo..odam carney ran a successful buisness in
aussie

Charlie Stitt
1st March 2010, 21:26
Sorry southbankelder, you have lost me. What ship/incident are you referring to?

southbankelder
2nd March 2010, 22:21
Sorry southbankelder, you have lost me. What ship/incident are you referring to?

kaduna

duquesa
2nd March 2010, 22:42
Am I missing something here?? Kaduna?? Bank Line??

helen 1965
12th August 2011, 19:57
Hi can any1 help im looking for a crew member of the bankline ships possibily in the early 80s. I met him when they docked in durban when i went on board for a visit with my uncle Alex Barnes who at the time was chief engineer.. If any1 knows wot has become of "tricky" i think his real name could have been Richard Bayes hope to hear from some1 as i have been searching for some time now.... Thanks

Helen(*))

jasser
20th August 2011, 08:22
I sailed with tricky on the Cedarbank in 1979 and If Alex Barnes was from Northern Ireland then it might have been the same trip. I don't know what has become of Richard, but I have a few photo's taken that trip. PM me with an e-mail address and I can try and send them to you.
Jimmy.

Alan Rawlinson
21st August 2011, 13:31
Alan, I sailed with Healeywhen he was 2nd Mate on Lindenbank when he paid off he was sitting for Masters(1968) Next and last time I saw him was in New Plymouth as master of Ivybank(had his wife Mildred with him) To me he was a very capable man when Second Mate and it didn't surprise me when the then Harbour Master Captain Flett told me who the master was.
John Milne

Further to my reply to yours - it was 1985 and in Dubai when Healey (and Mildred) arrived when he was master of the Pikebank. We had a very pleasant couple of days, and a nice meal in the revolving ( better known as the revolting ) restaurant, in the Sheraton Hotel.

Anyone out there sail on the Pikebank on that trip?

helen 1965
24th August 2011, 19:50
thank you so much email helenbelfast@hotmail.com yes alex was from northern ireland. I have pics somewhere when i dressed up in the white uniform you all wore ... cant wait for pics ,,,,thanks so much

helen

Waighty
29th August 2011, 10:31
Just to bring a tear to the eye. (Sad)

Weirbank seven bells smoko
Weirbank homeward bound
Sprucebank at Lae and a last walk ashore before leaving for San Francisco
Sprucebank crossing the North Sea Hamburg to Hull viewed from the area mentioned
Weirbank on a quiet evening just before dinner on the way arcross the Pacific

I'm another one like Alastair who remembers the not so good bits but prefers the rose tinted glasses point of view at this point in my history. (Thumb)

Noticed the chaps sitting on deck; the one in the foreground is Paul Yuill who I sailed with as cadets in Ben Line. He found passing 2nd Mates all too much and went uncert 3rd Mate with Mac Andrews for a while and obviously Bank Line too. Not a clue what happened to him. Another photo in cargo ships gallery with him in it on Benvannoch 1966 but North Sea, not tropics!

Waighty
17th October 2011, 19:54
My ships in Bank Line...
Cederbank 63-64 app
Streambank 64-65 app
Birchbank 65-66 app
Sprucebank 66 app
Teviotbank 67 3/0
Roybank 67-69 3/0
Rowanbank 69 2/0
Weirbank 69-71 2/0
Laganbank 71-72 2/0
Dartbank 72-73 2/0
Then got married and went to Silver Line Chemical Tankers for short voyages.

I sailed with you briefly when I did the 'coast' on the Rowanbank in 1969, Les Steers was Master. It was my first experience of a Bank Boat; you were 2nd Mate I was 3rd Mate (uncert). Joined Liverpool in August and left in London in September. I seem to recall you smoking a pipe a lot of the time! You gave me a lot of help to adjust to Bank Line ways. After passing 2nd Mates I stayed with Bank Line pretty much all through. Hope all's well with you.

ambosscorp
16th January 2012, 16:47
5th Engineer to 2nd Engineer on the following:

MV Hauraki Apr 69 to Sept 69
MV Hinakura Dec 69 to Jan 70
MV Weybank Sept 70 to Oct 71
MV Gowanbank Jan 72 to Aug 72
MV Elmbank Oct 72 to Dec 72
MV Marabank Jan 73 to Sept 73
MV Birchbank Dec 73 to Jun 74
MV Hollybank Aug 74
MV Forestbank Sept 74 to Jun 75

Bryan Wilson

R58484956
17th January 2012, 15:37
Bryan Looks like you had plenty of leave between ships, on Cunard 2 weeks.

ambosscorp
17th January 2012, 15:55
Well we needed the time to attend therapy and AA classes between ships...(*))

Donald McGhee
22nd January 2012, 06:07
We are here, talk to us, love to hear fom ya. DO IT !(Pint)

Alan Rawlinson
15th March 2013, 16:07
I notice there are 218 members on another Bank Line site and counting. Would be nice to attract some new ones to contribute here on SN, rather than us regulars!

Barrie Youde
15th March 2013, 17:17
Please allow me to say that I, for one (as a non-Bank Liner), enjoy reading the Bank Line postings for the sole reason that they are usually of great interest! Your experiences were far beyond those of most liner companies - if you regarded yourselves as a liner company at all. They were certainly beyond most experiences of mine, other than that I remember your ships only with kindness for the hospitality and civility received on board on many occasions.

Thank you!

Happy days .

BY

Alan Rawlinson
15th March 2013, 18:24
Please allow me to say that I, for one (as a non-Bank Liner), enjoy reading the Bank Line postings for the sole reason that they are usually of great interest! Your experiences were far beyond those of most liner companies - if you regarded yourselves as a liner company at all. They were certainly beyond most experiences of mine, other than that I remember your ships only with kindness for the hospitality and civility received on board on many occasions.

Thank you!

Happy days .

BY

Hi Barrie,

Wow! Praise indeed..... Many thanks on behalf of all of us.

Your post reminded me of ship visits in general, the strangest one I recall was to a Russian ship ( in the old iron curtain days) tied up astern in Visagapatam one Xmas. It was surreal, with a battered piano in the old fashioned lounge, and with pictures of Lenin, but strangely very welcoming with Vodka and back slapping exchanges. The Guys on board couldn't have been more friendly, although slightly wild, playing with air guns and getting tanked up.

oldseamerchant
15th March 2013, 19:22
Bank Line was the envy of many. The runs were second to none and if you could hack the long trips command was available at a relatively young age.

Aberdonian
15th March 2013, 22:02
Copied in 1955 from a Bank Line advertisement:


THE BANK LINE

World Wide Services

Subsidiary Companies


AMERICAS

AMERICAN & INDIAN LINE:
US and Canadian East Coast to and from Ceylon, Burma, India and Pakistan.

AMERICAN & INDIAN BRANCH SERVICE:
US and Canadian East Coast to and from Mediterranean (if necessary), Malabar Coast, Ceylon, Madras Coast, India and Burma.

BOMBAY AMERICA LINE:
New York and Philadelphia to and from Bombay.

AMERICAN & ORIENTAL LINE:
US Atlantic and Pacific Coasts to Far East countries returning to USA and Canada via Suez.

CALCUTTA – BRAZIL and RIVER PLATE SERVICE:
All main South American Atlantic ports to and from India, Ceylon and Malabar Coast.

INDIAN – CHILEAN LINE:
West Coast ports of South America to and from India, Burma, Malaya and Indonesia. (Colombo and Cochin when opportunity).

US GULF AUSTRALIAN LINE and US GULF NEW ZEALAND LINE:
All US Gulf ports to and from all Australian and New Zealand ports. (Trinidad when inducement).

US GULF to SOUTH AFRICA:
US Gulf ports to and from South and East Africa.


AFRICA

INDIAN AFRICAN LINE and INDIA - NATAL LINE:
East and South African ports to and from Burma, Indian ports, Ceylon (also Madagascar when opportunity).

ORIENTAL AFRICAN LINE:
East and South African ports, Reunion and Mauritius to Far Eastern countries.

US GULF to SOUTH AFRICA:
All South and East African ports to all US Gulf ports.


ASIA

AMERICAN and INDIAN LINE:
Ceylon, Burma, India and Pakistan to and from US and Canadian East Coast.

AMERICAN and INDIAN BRANCH LINE SERVICE:
Mediterranean (if necessary), Malabar Coast, Ceylon, Madras Coast, India and Burma to and from US and Canadian East Coast.

BOMBAY AMERICA LINE:
Bombay to and from New York and Philadelphia.

AMERICAN and ORIENTAL LINE:
Far East countries to USA and Canada via Suez returning US Atlantic and Pacific ports.

CALCUTTA – BRAZIL and RIVER PLATE SERVICE:
India, Ceylon and Malabar Coast to and from all main South American Atlantic ports.

INDIAN CHILEAN LINE:
India, Burma, Malaya and Indonesia (Colombo and Cochin when opportunity) to and from West Coast ports of South America.

INDIAN AFRICAN and INDIA – NATAL LINE:
Burma, Indian ports, Ceylon (also Madagascar when opportunity) to and from East African ports.

ORIENTAL AFRICAN LINE:
Far East countries to and from East African and South African ports, Reunion and Mauritius.


AUSTRALASIA

US GULF - AUSTRALIA LINE and US GULF - NEW ZEALAND LINE:
Regularly to and from all ports in Australia and New Zealand to all US Gulf ports.


PERSIAN GULF

The Company operates widely as General Merchants, Exporters and Importers and Ships Agents.


ANDREW WEIR SHIPPING & TRADING COMPANY LIMITED


Everywhere.......... bar the UK – Continent!

Keith

jmcg
15th March 2013, 22:14
Bank Line was the envy of many. The runs were second to none and if you could hack the long trips command was available at a relatively young age.


Not sure they would take on an ex Blue Funnel AB with a 2nd mates ticket. You seem to be fixed on "command"!

J

Alan Rawlinson
15th March 2013, 22:45
Copied in 1955 from a Bank Line advertisement:


THE BANK LINE

World Wide Services

Subsidiary Companies


AMERICAS

AMERICAN & INDIAN LINE:
US and Canadian East Coast to and from Ceylon, Burma, India and Pakistan.

AMERICAN & INDIAN BRANCH SERVICE:
US and Canadian East Coast to and from Mediterranean (if necessary), Malabar Coast, Ceylon, Madras Coast, India and Burma.

BOMBAY AMERICA LINE:
New York and Philadelphia to and from Bombay.

AMERICAN & ORIENTAL LINE:
US Atlantic and Pacific Coasts to Far East countries returning to USA and Canada via Suez.

CALCUTTA – BRAZIL and RIVER PLATE SERVICE:
All main South American Atlantic ports to and from India, Ceylon and Malabar Coast.

INDIAN – CHILEAN LINE:
West Coast ports of South America to and from India, Burma, Malaya and Indonesia. (Colombo and Cochin when opportunity).

US GULF AUSTRALIAN LINE and US GULF NEW ZEALAND LINE:
All US Gulf ports to and from all Australian and New Zealand ports. (Trinidad when inducement).

US GULF to SOUTH AFRICA:
US Gulf ports to and from South and East Africa.


AFRICA

INDIAN AFRICAN LINE and INDIA - NATAL LINE:
East and South African ports to and from Burma, Indian ports, Ceylon (also Madagascar when opportunity).

ORIENTAL AFRICAN LINE:
East and South African ports, Reunion and Mauritius to Far Eastern countries.

US GULF to SOUTH AFRICA:
All South and East African ports to all US Gulf ports.


ASIA

AMERICAN and INDIAN LINE:
Ceylon, Burma, India and Pakistan to and from US and Canadian East Coast.

AMERICAN and INDIAN BRANCH LINE SERVICE:
Mediterranean (if necessary), Malabar Coast, Ceylon, Madras Coast, India and Burma to and from US and Canadian East Coast.

BOMBAY AMERICA LINE:
Bombay to and from New York and Philadelphia.

AMERICAN and ORIENTAL LINE:
Far East countries to USA and Canada via Suez returning US Atlantic and Pacific ports.

CALCUTTA – BRAZIL and RIVER PLATE SERVICE:
India, Ceylon and Malabar Coast to and from all main South American Atlantic ports.

INDIAN CHILEAN LINE:
India, Burma, Malaya and Indonesia (Colombo and Cochin when opportunity) to and from West Coast ports of South America.

INDIAN AFRICAN and INDIA – NATAL LINE:
Burma, Indian ports, Ceylon (also Madagascar when opportunity) to and from East African ports.

ORIENTAL AFRICAN LINE:
Far East countries to and from East African and South African ports, Reunion and Mauritius.


AUSTRALASIA

US GULF - AUSTRALIA LINE and US GULF - NEW ZEALAND LINE:
Regularly to and from all ports in Australia and New Zealand to all US Gulf ports.


PERSIAN GULF

The Company operates widely as General Merchants, Exporters and Importers and Ships Agents.


ANDREW WEIR SHIPPING & TRADING COMPANY LIMITED


Everywhere.......... bar the UK – Continent!

Keith

Keith,

Departed the Bank Line after a lot of agonizing as we were discharging copra in London on the Southbank circa 1961. The old man was asking me to sign on again for another trip as Mate, but I had made my mind up. One of the temptations to stay for another trip was the news that we were to load coke for Noumea ( New Caledonia) from the Continent - one of the first loadings of this new - and novel - route for the Bank Line ships. I believe it carried on for quite a while.

Aberdonian
15th March 2013, 23:29
After second mates exams, and impecunious as ever, I followed the suggestion of an old pal of mine and joined Joe Shell on a 2 year contract in the belief this would be a swift route to becoming solvent once more.

Keith

Aberdonian
15th March 2013, 23:37
Hi Barrie,

Your post reminded me of ship visits in general, the strangest one I recall was to a Russian ship ( in the old iron curtain days) tied up astern in Visagapatam one Xmas. It was surreal, with a battered piano in the old fashioned lounge, and with pictures of Lenin, but strangely very welcoming with Vodka and back slapping exchanges. The Guys on board couldn't have been more friendly, although slightly wild, playing with air guns and getting tanked up.

Here's a re-run of my "Cold War New Year"

In 1960 I was third mate in the 9000 ton, Chinese crew, Shell tanker “Latia” which was then permanently on the Italian coast on charter to Shell Italiano. We routinely loaded Sicilian crude at a terminal near Syracuse for various destinations, our home port being La Spezia.

New Years Eve saw me and our Glaswegian fourth engineer walking unsteadily back towards our ship after a run ashore in La Spezia. In high spirits we impulsively boarded an American C3, one of the Isthmian Line “Steel” ships if I remember rightly. We were warmly invited to join several officers already in their cups. In a rosy glow, we invited them back to our ship before taking our leave.

A Russian ship with a deckload of timber was moored further along the quay and yes we boarded her, too. Again we were well received by her officers who promptly produced a bottle of vodka. After removal, the cork was thrown away with a flourish. We were mildly surprised when, after getting the captain’s permission, they happily accepted an invitation back to our tanker.

Back on board the “Latia,” not without a little apprehension I informed the master we were expecting company. A genial Yorkshireman, he was particularly pleased that Russians would be among our guests since he had sailed in wartime convoys to Russia during the Second War. He had the chief steward see to arrangements.

We had a great night entertaining four men from each ship. The large American chief engineer, said to be of Cherokee descent, sat quietly in a corner drinking from his own bottle of Black & White but everybody else was in good voice. Our Chinese pumpman accompanied the singing, where he could, on his mouth organ. The Russians eclipsed everybody else with their sentimental singing in harmony.

That gathering of seamen bringing in the New Year in good fellowship is an enduring memory. The Cold War was very much alive at that time. A few months earlier a US U-2 spy plane was shot down over the Soviet Union causing Khrushchev to cancel the Paris Summit, but such things were of little account that night.

Keith

Barrie Youde
15th March 2013, 23:57
#136

Wonderful!

Thanks for sharing!!

John Dryden
16th March 2013, 00:31
I notice there are 218 members on another Bank Line site and counting. Would be nice to attract some new ones to contribute here on SN, rather than us regulars!

The site of which you speak is only open to ex Bank Line crew whereas on here anyone can come aboard,Russians,Americans..even Blue Flue!
Liverpool pilots especially welcome.(Thumb)

John Briggs
16th March 2013, 02:26
I always look at the Bank Line comments as I feel it was one of the iconic British tramp outfits.
I really enjoy reading the threads.

Alan Rawlinson
16th March 2013, 13:02
The site of which you speak is only open to ex Bank Line crew whereas on here anyone can come aboard,Russians,Americans..even Blue Flue!
Liverpool pilots especially welcome.(Thumb)

True John, - and all the better for it. Would be nice to draw in some more Bank Line 'sleepers' though!

Alistair Macnab
16th March 2013, 20:00
I always look at the Bank Line comments as I feel it was one of the iconic British tramp outfits.
I really enjoy reading the threads.

John....

I think I have mentioned this already to you but in case you have forgotten, Bank Line had MANY liner services as noted in this section by Aberdonian. What is it that maintains in your mind that Bank Line was a
"Tramp Outfit"?

True, each ship unit went from one liner service to another liner service with often a bulk cargo thrown in between. But that's not the definition of a tramp ship nor indeed a tramp outfit!

As a policy matter, 'captive' ships to a certain service were few and far between and mainly confined to the Indian-African, Oriental African and Pacific Islands services (deeptanks being the criterion for this last).

Yes, Bank Line was iconic and a one-off.

I spent 29 years trying to combat the myth you choose to perpetuate so you are not the only person who should have known better. If I sound affronted by your categorization after all these years, then you need to know that I am. Other Bank Line personnel may not agree with me and say "what's the beef?" I know its not terribly important but there it is!

Having spent 15 years in the USA sending three ships a month to Australia and one ship a month to New Zealand as well as the occasional time charter to the oil majors for project shipments to the Middle East and several time-filler sugar cargoes from the Caribbean to USA ports when too many empty ships were about to descend upon us at one time, if that constitutes a "tramp outfit" then, indeed, all well-managed shipping companies that worked on the principle that an empty ship was a money-loser, all the British so-called 'liner companies' will have to be reclassified!

Sorry to go on like this but it's a matter of pride to me that Bank Line in its prime should not be casually slighted.

John Briggs
16th March 2013, 20:58
No slight intended Alistair. I spent quite a few years in a tramp company myself.
We were regularly chartered to major outfits and went on liner runs for a year or so.
I think you will find that in the general shipping community, Bank Line were considered a tramp company.
I was proud of my time in tramps.

oldseamerchant
16th March 2013, 21:09
Alistair,

I would have to agree with John Briggs in the general perception of Bank Line. I am sure we are all aware that they were different than the Watts Watts, Tatems, Chapmans etc etc but the perception was there all the same.

Barrie Youde
16th March 2013, 21:32
#130 to 142 inclusive,

Very many thanks chaps - all very informative.

Taken to gether, the above posts triggered in my memory the fact that most of us, probably, will remember verbatim the things (or most of them) which we absorbed on the first day of joining our first ships. It dawns on me now that I can probably remember almost everything said to me that day aboard Jason in Gladstone Dock, word for word.

A thing which I remember vividly was that the Senior Middy, Bob Blair, had received a letter (an air-mail letter - remember them?) from one of his former shipmates who had been posted to one of Blue Flue's longer trips. The posting was to either the Singapore-Fremantle run or Singapore- Jedda with pilgrims.Blair read out the letter for the benefit of the rest of us. Either way, the point was that his friend was boasting in his letter that he would be away from home home for ten months "not like you ferry-boat men doing a four month roundtrip to Aussie." Thus was spelled out on my very first day the underlying admiration which the short-trip sailor has for the longer-trip sailor.

I'm more than happy to accept Alistair's view that Bank Line was "iconic" and "one-off". Both words are grossly overused in common usage but wholly appropriate here. Perhaps Bank Line needs no description apart from its own name? For sure, whenever the words "Bank Line" are spoken, every sailor has a fairly vivid picture of what is meant.

gde
16th March 2013, 21:54
The Bank Line meant a lot to me and my brothers,the Bank Line gave us all a greater understanding of engineering,the hard way,which in my own view was the best.True The Bank Line ships may have been called 'tramp ships' but that did not matter.My elder brother James DA Elder did in fact serve a number of years with the Bank Line (2nd Engr) before moving to another well known UK Shipping Group where he met some of the worst engineers he had ever worked with,they were so bad that they could not even strip and rebuild a small emergency engine !Things got so bad that he came ashore and built up a local hotel/bar and restaurant.He is now 75 years old,deaf but still recalls his time with Andrew Weir with the greatest affection.To me, the Bank Line was a British Company that went through good times and bad,and in fact they were one of the last break bulk cargo liners shipping companies to stop trading not so many years ago.In ending this post I would like to thank Alistair for giving everyone in this world a true account of The Bank Line and Andrew Weir,well done Alistair.

Hamish Mackintosh
16th March 2013, 23:34
When I joined a Bankline ship in North Shields I didn't know a thing about them, in fact I thought they only had the one ship, the Ivybank, it didn't help matters that none of the crew were "company men"only the Master, Capt Hale(who I have only heard mentioned of twice on this site)and the senior Apprentice, one John Appelby LeeBarber,the chief Engineer may have been, but I only ever saw him out of his cabin twice in the nineteen months we were away, everyone else were"From Away"even the other three Aprentices were first trippers, I soon found out about them tho, as being a company that took you away and didn't bring you back for a long while, so much for the pool mans statement "just a quick trip to the continent, the states, and home before you know it"in fact I still have the telegram I sent my mother telling her where we were going and when to expect me home, boy was I green. But I must say that of all the ships I was on, that one trip, on a great run ,sticks in my mind, more than all the others, and if I could roll back the calender and do it all again I would, only I would pay more attention next time

jimthehat
17th March 2013, 00:12
#130 to 142 inclusive,

Very many thanks chaps - all very informative.

Taken to gether, the above posts triggered in my memory the fact that most of us, probably, will remember verbatim the things (or most of them) which we absorbed on the first day of joining our first ships. It dawns on me now that I can probably remember almost everything said to me that day aboard Jason in Gladstone Dock, word for word.

A thing which I remember vividly was that the Senior Middy, Bob Blair, had received a letter (an air-mail letter - remember them?) from one of his former shipmates who had been posted to one of Blue Flue's longer trips. The posting was to either the Singapore-Fremantle run or Singapore- Jedda with pilgrims.Blair read out the letter for the benefit of the rest of us. Either way, the point was that his friend was boasting in his letter that he would be away from home home for ten months "not like you ferry-boat men doing a four month roundtrip to Aussie." Thus was spelled out on my very first day the underlying admiration which the short-trip sailor has for the longer-trip sailor.

I'm more than happy to accept Alistair's view that Bank Line was "iconic" and "one-off". Both words are grossly overused in common usage but wholly appropriate here. Perhaps Bank Line needs no description apart from its own name? For sure, whenever the words "Bank Line" are spoken, every sailor has a fairly vivid picture of what is meant.
Bbarrie,not sure whether you are referring to bank line when you mention "not like you ferry boat men on a 4 month round trip"
My first trip was 18 months,second trip 13 months,third trip 17 months then it was up for second mates then 22 months as 3/0
then exactly 24 months on the next ship,then 19 months and last trip in Bank line another 17 months.
I did not take on the role of a ferryboat man until I joined ASN/Townsend in 1966. So 7 ships totaling 130months.
jim

John Dryden
17th March 2013, 01:24
Jim that is some record in Bank Line.Long trips every one so it must have been odd working on ferries after that.Also looking at your later career,how did the job in Jeddah go down in comparison?

Alan Rawlinson
17th March 2013, 08:30
John....

I think I have mentioned this already to you but in case you have forgotten, Bank Line had MANY liner services as noted in this section by Aberdonian. What is it that maintains in your mind that Bank Line was a
"Tramp Outfit"?

True, each ship unit went from one liner service to another liner service with often a bulk cargo thrown in between. But that's not the definition of a tramp ship nor indeed a tramp outfit!

As a policy matter, 'captive' ships to a certain service were few and far between and mainly confined to the Indian-African, Oriental African and Pacific Islands services (deeptanks being the criterion for this last).

Yes, Bank Line was iconic and a one-off.

I spent 29 years trying to combat the myth you choose to perpetuate so you are not the only person who should have known better. If I sound affronted by your categorization after all these years, then you need to know that I am. Other Bank Line personnel may not agree with me and say "what's the beef?" I know its not terribly important but there it is!

Having spent 15 years in the USA sending three ships a month to Australia and one ship a month to New Zealand as well as the occasional time charter to the oil majors for project shipments to the Middle East and several time-filler sugar cargoes from the Caribbean to USA ports when too many empty ships were about to descend upon us at one time, if that constitutes a "tramp outfit" then, indeed, all well-managed shipping companies that worked on the principle that an empty ship was a money-loser, all the British so-called 'liner companies' will have to be reclassified!

Sorry to go on like this but it's a matter of pride to me that Bank Line in its prime should not be casually slighted.


Alistair, Seems like you have triggered an endless discussion with this topic...

No doubt you are technically correct, but as you know it is not winnable, because PERCEPTION IS EVERYTHING, and this is most noticeable in everyday politics...

Looks like we are stuck with the 'tramping' tag!

Barrie Youde
17th March 2013, 09:01
#147,

Hi, Jim,

Precisely the opposite!

It was my reference to a ten-month posting which might have been comparable (just) with Bank Line.

The "ferry-boat men on a four month round trip" was a reference to a voyage in another liner company, in this case Blue Flue.

Alan has a point at#149 that perception is of some significance. My own perception of Bank Line has only ever been of a liner company (and one of the major companies, to boot) with a difference.

The strength of Bank Line's representation here in SN seems to confirm the point, if any confirmation might be needed! Nobody could describe Bank Line as merely a tramp company, even if many of its operations had some of the characteristics of tramping. Everything else about the company was at the highest standards which ever operated in the Merchant Fleet -or so it seemed to me; and still does.

Barrie Youde
17th March 2013, 09:27
#150

I'll take perception a step further and say that on going aboard a Bank Line ship I never did see any of the characteristics of a trampship. It was only the log-book which disclosed that you had been away for a long time!

Alan Rawlinson
17th March 2013, 09:41
Barrie

Interesting observation - you had the position to judge..

Personally, I will gladly say that I was proud to sail in one of the leading 'tramp' companies throughout the 1950's., if that's what people want to hear!

oldseamerchant
17th March 2013, 10:08
#150

I'll take perception a step further and say that on going aboard a Bank Line ship I never did see any of the characteristics of a trampship. It was only the log-book which disclosed that you had been away for a long time!

Would you care to expand on highlighted above.

jimthehat
17th March 2013, 10:49
Jim that is some record in Bank Line.Long trips every one so it must have been odd working on ferries after that.Also looking at your later career,how did the job in Jeddah go down in comparison?

Six years in Jeddah, we lived the life of Riley,.Most of the time I lived out at Armaska in a little bungelow with swimming pool ,squash courts and tenniss courts to hand.
I had the chance to bring my wife and daughter out on a permanant basis,but I choose to bring them out three times a year for six weeks at a time. The company had their own camp up at the creek where we had all sorts of leasure things9yachts,boards and scuba gear )
Life was good and even tho it was an alcohol free country there was still booze around,one just had to be careful about transporting it around cos if you were caught one was in big trouble.

jim

Alan Rawlinson
17th March 2013, 11:50
Would you care to expand on highlighted above.

Not sure what answer you will get from Barrie, who must have had boarded ships of all types and sizes.

Pondering the answer made me think of a good friend (ex P & O) who was appointed Master of a third world tramp. He was unable to communicate (apart from a few key words) to his mate or Ch Engineer or anyone else for that matter as they were a hotch potch of nationalities.

Arriving in the Thames, he wanted to anchor off Canvey Island, and gave up the struggle from the bridge, and made his way forward to let go the anchor himself!

Barrie Youde
17th March 2013, 11:59
#153

Not particularly, Bill. I haven't the slightest doubt that your own experiences will have given you at least some knowledge of the subject.

Aberdonian
17th March 2013, 12:27
When the Liberty ship Tielbank lay moored in the Hooghly close by a P & O cargo ship, we watched her smartly turned out Indian crewmen going about their duties with every bit as much alacrity as our own kalassies. However, at sunset each day on board the P & O vessel, a shrill blast from an Acme Thunderer would be the signal for all the flags along the length of the ship to be lowered at the same time.
Impressed, it was decided we should sink to the occasion with a suitable response.

It was our resident prankster, Peter the fourth engineer, who came up with the idea. Down in the engine room, for the next day or so, he honed his bugle playing “skills” on a length of metal tubing. Near sunset on the appointed day, we posted men to the halyards while Peter in full dress boiler suit took up position on the monkey island. (See attached photo.
As soon as the bunting on the other ship was taken down, Peter silhouetted against a rosy Calcutta sky “played” a bugle passage which rang out over the river as our flags were ceremoniously lowered.

Oh, yes, we Bank Line men were well aware of our place in the grand scheme of things.

Keith

jmcg
17th March 2013, 12:31
#153

Not particularly, Bill. I haven't the slightest doubt that your own experiences will have given you at least some knowledge of the subject.

A most appropriate answer. The same amount of derricks that the Captain has accounts!

As we all signed articles for 2 years (FG) surely all so called liner outfits had the potential to become tramps.

As for the Bank Line, all I can say is that they were fine, well preserved and maintained vessels. Easily identified too by their svelte lines.

Were they all chinese or indian crewed ?


BW

J(Gleam)(Gleam)

Mike Agate
17th March 2013, 12:39
As an Apprentice
Trentbank July 62-May63 Master A Brown*
Southbank May63-Dec63 D Campbell *****
Foylbank Feb64-July64 R Brant ******
BeaverbankAug64-Apr65 Lynch ***
larchbank July65-Jan 66 Thorn **
Laganbank Apr66-Oct 66 Scott ***

All but the Trent were on the Copra run,good memories,not so good on the Trent,as I lost my shore leave,from Bira to Bremman

As 3rd mate
Relived on the Fleet.FIR.and Clover.
Yewbank Oct67-Oct68 W Rudderford and W.W.Davies ****
Roybank Dec69-Apr71 J.M.Mackenzie**********

Paid off in Bluff,sold the sextant,and started a new Life,but if I had to do it again,I would not change a thing.

oldseamerchant
17th March 2013, 13:33
#153

Not particularly, Bill. I haven't the slightest doubt that your own experiences will have given you at least some knowledge of the subject.

A lot more than you!

Barrie Youde
17th March 2013, 13:51
#160

Then why ask me?

oldseamerchant
17th March 2013, 14:03
Pondering the answer made me think of a good friend (ex P & O) who was appointed Master of a third world tramp. He was unable to communicate (apart from a few key words) to his mate or Ch Engineer or anyone else for that matter as they were a hotch potch of nationalities.



Alan,
That one was doing the rounds in the 60s. Rest assured they people who know all about 'third world tramps' and FOCs are those who never sailed in them or perhaps like your friend did one or two and called it a day.

Barrie Youde
17th March 2013, 14:13
#162

And the relevance of Flags of Convenience and third world ships in this thread is precisely what?

oldseamerchant
17th March 2013, 14:17
Assuming you have done the reading course try post 155

jmcg
17th March 2013, 14:29
A lot more than you!

It would be most heplful to all if you allow us details of where and how you accumulated the greater experience.

Come on now - help us out -we really are intrigued and of course willing to learn.

J

oldseamerchant
17th March 2013, 14:44
Come on now - help us out -we really are intrigued and of course willing to learn.

J

To late for for you GeePee as you had you chances at sea and did nothing.

Barrie Youde
17th March 2013, 14:44
#164

The point which Alan made in point 155 was that life aboard such ships was very different from anything experienced in Bank Line.

If you are determined to make yourself thoroughly unpleasant, please be assured that you are making great progress in that direction.

Aberdonian
17th March 2013, 14:49
It's getting to look like, "Pistols for two and breakfast for one" round 'ere.

oldseamerchant
17th March 2013, 14:50
#164

The point which Alan made in point 155 was that life aboard such ships was very different from anything experienced in Bank Line.



And that was the relevance.

Barrie Youde
17th March 2013, 14:54
It would seem to follow, in those circumstances, that the proper place for discussion of such ships is in another thread.

oldseamerchant
17th March 2013, 14:58
It's getting to look like, "Pistols for two and breakfast for one" round 'ere.

I would not disagree Aberdonian and it is a shame. However, there is only so much that people can expect to take when every post you make is followed by some smart ass comment by some individual who is playing to the gallery and probably fed by others. Some do not like to talk ship as it exposes their own weaknesses/experience /qualifications and produce a 'smoke screen' as a defence mechanism. This is surprising when it is a nautical.ship site. I'll talk ship all day and have no interest in personal dialogue with anyone.

Barrie Youde
17th March 2013, 15:17
#171

It seems to have escaped your notice, Bill old chum, that dialogue takes place in SN on many subjects apart from ships.

Long may it continue to do so. I am sorry that you have no interest in personal matters. It sounds as though you lead a very lonely life.

Please let me know if I can help you.

Best wishes,

BY

jmcg
17th March 2013, 15:43
osm

Why not re-visit your profile, populate a few details in order to assist in your identity (for those who do not know who you are). Be careful though, do not over polish your ego.

Oh yes, I had "chances" in BF and elsewhere. I took them all.

Clearly, the long passage of enforced time ashore from this ship has not had the desired effect.

J

jmcg
17th March 2013, 15:47
I would not disagree Aberdonian and it is a shame. However, there is only so much that people can expect to take when every post you make is followed by some smart ass comment by some individual who is playing to the gallery and probably fed by others. Some do not like to talk ship as it exposes their own weaknesses/experience /qualifications and produce a 'smoke screen' as a defence mechanism. This is surprising when it is a nautical.ship site. I'll talk ship all day and have no interest in personal dialogue with anyone.

We would dearly love to learn of your weaknesses/experiences/qualifications with the same hunger that you appear to have. My cards are on the table - over to you now

J

Robert Bush
17th March 2013, 16:04
Apart from knowing Alistair in his semi retirement the only other Bank Line person I have known was a lad named Gamblin from Sailisbury. He went away as a Bank Line apprentice in 1945 and I met him again up for 2nd. Mates in Southampton.

He told me a story of cleaning tween decks in Alexandria where they nearly had a crew strike, rather comical at the time. Working with the kalassies who were all good Muslims like the stevadores one poor kalassies put his hand in a large Egyptian turd, bad for his religion, and he screamed. The apprentices roared with laughter and the crew marched up to the Mate and went on strike.

The Mate tore a strip off the apprentices but managed to get the deck serang to calm down his men and got them back to work.

Regarding long trips the Asiatic SN Co deck apprentices did four years without going home.

Bank Line in my view was an excellent training for seamen, just like Everards and the Straits Steamship Co in the coastal trades were for in shore navigators. Tramp ships also provided good experience but not very good feeding. Cannot see why tramping is looked upon in a negative way, admittedly some owners were skinflints and not very honest but so were some linership owners..

Although I sailed with some good western crews I preferred Asians.

jimthehat
17th March 2013, 16:12
A most appropriate answer. The same amount of derricks that the Captain has accounts!

As we all signed articles for 2 years (FG) surely all so called liner outfits had the potential to become tramps.

As for the Bank Line, all I can say is that they were fine, well preserved and maintained vessels. Easily identified too by their svelte lines.

Were they all chinese or indian crewed ?


BW

J(Gleam)(Gleam)

When I joined the company we had at least 2 white crew ships,my first ship(Maplebank was orininally from london but we kept on losing them in Oz and Kiwi,If I remember right it was only the bosun and chief steward that arrrived back in Liverpool 18 months later.
We had a few Chinese crewed ship but the majority were Indian,so my tally was 1 white crew,2 Chinese and 4 Indian crews.

jim

oldseamerchant
17th March 2013, 16:14
We would dearly love to learn of your weaknesses/experiences/qualifications with the same hunger that you appear to have. My cards are on the table - over to you now

J


GeePee,

You have nothing at all and well you know it!

jmcg
17th March 2013, 16:25
GeePee,

You have nothing at all and well you know it!

Try honesty Bill Davies!


A predictable response from one whose cover has been blown away.

John

John Dryden
17th March 2013, 16:28
Never thought I,d see a Bank liner under a FOC(Foolish Oldseamerchant Comments)

jmcg
17th March 2013, 16:32
[QUOTE=jimthehat;663551]When I joined the company we had at least 2 white crew ships,my first ship(Maplebank was orininally from london but we kept on losing them in Oz and Kiwi,If I remember right it was only the bosun and chief steward that arrrived back in Liverpool 18 months later.
We had a few Chinese crewed ship but the majority were Indian,so my tally was 1 white crew,2 Chinese and 4 Indian crews.


Thanks Jim- wiser now!

BW

J(Gleam)(Gleam)

oldseamerchant
17th March 2013, 16:37
Never thought I,d see a Bank liner under a FOC(Foolish Oldseamerchant Comments)

Another one! 69-73...wow

jmcg
17th March 2013, 16:45
Perhaps with spending so long away at sea Captain Bill Davies that humility, civility and good manners passed you by.

J

joe732
17th March 2013, 17:04
Perhaps with spending so long away at sea Captain Bill Davies that humility, civility and good manners passed you by.

J

That can't be an excuse.

Plenty of equally, if not more experienced and qualified posters on this thread, who havent stooped to Capt Bill's level.

Obviously has a lack of experience in personal dialogue.

Alan Rawlinson
17th March 2013, 17:53
No need for anyone to denigrate Tramp shipping surely.... What counts is what it made of all of us.

In the 90's I was fortunate enough to place my son on an SD14 tramp. "The Lady Aryete". She tramped around in the undisputed pure sense of the phrase, picking up cargoes as and when available. and he was infinitely richer for the experience.

Alan Rawlinson
17th March 2013, 17:58
Alan,
That one was doing the rounds in the 60s. Rest assured they people who know all about 'third world tramps' and FOCs are those who never sailed in them or perhaps like your friend did one or two and called it a day.

True story - as told to me by my pal when I was kindly invited on board for dinner in Tilbury.

Johnnietwocoats
17th March 2013, 18:01
Who is Captain Bill Davies?......

oldseamerchant
17th March 2013, 18:16
True story - as told to me by my pal when I was kindly invited on board for dinner in Tilbury.

Well it may well have been but I can assure you that what you describe was not something I experienced and I spent a long time in foreign ships.

Johnnietwocoats
17th March 2013, 18:23
Well it may well have been but I can assure you that what you describe was not something I experienced and I spent a long time in foreign ships.


Any chance you could fill out your profile so I can see who, where, when, how and why you are so knowledgable......

jmcg
17th March 2013, 18:31
Any chance you could fill out your profile so I can see who, where, when, how and why you are so knowledgable......

Doubt it very much.

BW

J(Gleam)(Gleam)

joe732
17th March 2013, 18:36
Assuming you have done the reading course try post 155

Example of personal skills (or lack of).

Barrie Youde
17th March 2013, 18:48
THE BANK BOAT AT THE SKERRIES

Of all the companies I thank,
Not one has merit more than Bank,
Who, having circumnavigated
The world, six times and satiated,
Homeward looms on west horizon,
Chug-achugging, handsome size’un,
Laden down unto her marks,
Belching smoke and spewing sparks,
Business-like and home from sea,
Here comes the Bank-boat, flying “G”.

“Captain, We have got your mail!”
“Thank you! I will lower a pail”
And thus the pilot climbs aboard,
Welcomed, treated as a lord,
By fellow mariners at sea,
In nothing but civility.
“Hail, Good Morning, Mister Mate,”
Up the ladder, tete a tete,
“Let me take your bag, from here.
It’s pleasant for the time of year?”

“Good Morning, Captain. Did you get
The mail? I hope it is not wet.
You’re bound for Alex, Langton way?
That is the plan, we hear today.
I’ll check it later on, but now,
We’ll crack on to the Bar, somehow.”
And so, with light and pleasant banter
We carry on at half a canter,
And learn that, by the docking bill
We’ve time upon our hands to kill.

Bar anchorage for several hours,
To wait the pleasure of the powers:
Welcomed at the dining table,
Entertained by yarn and fable,
From harbours half a world away,
Remembered to the present day:
From men who took it in their stride;
No vanity nor undue pride.
Their chosen way to earn a crust;
And properly, as they knew they must.

Under way and heading in.
Two hundred Bensons. One of Gin.
Tugs? It’s one each end we’ll need.
Eye on bitts, via centre lead.
That should be about midnight.
Flood-way docking. Wind is light.
On the berth at half-past one.
The long and short of it is done.
“A final dram, for auld lang’s syne?”
“Captain, Thank you! Pleasure’s mine!”

BY
17.03.2013

Alan Rawlinson
17th March 2013, 19:05
THE BANK BOAT AT THE SKERRIES

Of all the companies I thank,
Not one has merit more than Bank,
Who, having circumnavigated
The world, six times and satiated,
Homeward looms on west horizon,
Chug-achugging, handsome size’un,
Laden down unto her marks,
Belching smoke and spewing sparks,
Business-like and home from sea,
Here comes the Bank-boat, flying “G”.

“Captain, We have got your mail!”
“Thank you! I will lower a pail”
And thus the pilot climbs aboard,
Welcomed, treated as a lord,
By fellow mariners at sea,
In nothing but civility.
“Hail, Good Morning, Mister Mate,”
Up the ladder, tete a tete,
“Let me take your bag, from here.
It’s pleasant for the time of year?”

“Good Morning, Captain. Did you get
The mail? I hope it is not wet.
You’re bound for Alex, Langton way?
That is the plan, we hear today.
I’ll check it later on, but now,
We’ll crack on to the Bar, somehow.”
And so, with light and pleasant banter
We carry on at half a canter,
And learn that, by the docking bill
We’ve time upon our hands to kill.

Bar anchorage for several hours,
To wait the pleasure of the powers:
Welcomed at the dining table,
Entertained by yarn and fable,
From harbours half a world away,
Remembered to the present day:
From men who took it in their stride;
No vanity nor undue pride.
Their chosen way to earn a crust;
And properly, as they knew they must.

Under way and heading in.
Two hundred Bensons. One of Gin.
Tugs? It’s one each end we’ll need.
Eye on bitts, via centre lead.
That should be about midnight.
Flood-way docking. Wind is light.
On the berth at half-past one.
The long and short of it is done.
“A final dram, for auld lang’s syne?”
“Captain, Thank you! Pleasure’s mine!”

BY
17.03.2013

Barrie

Brilliant. Well done.

P.S. See my " Bank Line Odyssey" thread

jmcg
17th March 2013, 20:21
A fine scribe Barry.

Did Bank Line have passenger carrying cargo ships that provided around the world cruises. I seem to recall that they purchased some suitable vessels during the late 70's for the purpose - possibly from former Eastern European builders?

BW

J(Gleam)(Gleam)

John Dryden
17th March 2013, 20:33
All Bank Line ships would carry passengers if required but they did advertise it more in the 70,and 80,s.I remember seeing one ad. and the price was £26 a day.At the time I thought that was expensive,think that was late 70,s.

joe732
17th March 2013, 20:51
Is it just me?

Or does a couple of posts by Capt Bill aka OSM, seem to have been deleted?

Apologies if I don't have the experience or qualifications to ask this question on a open internet forum?

oldseamerchant
17th March 2013, 21:10
Is it just me?



Apologies if I don't have the experience or qualifications to ask this question on a open internet forum?

Nothing more distasteful than an 'old bullet maker' sitting back stoking the flames of unrest.

No need to apologise for your inexperience or questionable qualifications.
If the hat fits wear it. I imagine it fits you very well.

Barrie Youde
17th March 2013, 21:25
#177

Bill, you owe John an apology for that one.

He has shown that he has the ability to maintain civil dialogue, which is a thing that you admit that you lack.

BY

Steve
17th March 2013, 21:36
Anyone got any evidence that this is BD, how many times can an individual keep joining a site under different names?

John Dryden
17th March 2013, 21:38
When the Liberty ship Tielbank lay moored in the Hooghly close by a P & O cargo ship, we watched her smartly turned out Indian crewmen going about their duties with every bit as much alacrity as our own kalassies. However, at sunset each day on board the P & O vessel, a shrill blast from an Acme Thunderer would be the signal for all the flags along the length of the ship to be lowered at the same time.
Impressed, it was decided we should sink to the occasion with a suitable response.

It was our resident prankster, Peter the fourth engineer, who came up with the idea. Down in the engine room, for the next day or so, he honed his bugle playing “skills” on a length of metal tubing. Near sunset on the appointed day, we posted men to the halyards while Peter in full dress boiler suit took up position on the monkey island. (See attached photo.
As soon as the bunting on the other ship was taken down, Peter silhouetted against a rosy Calcutta sky “played” a bugle passage which rang out over the river as our flags were ceremoniously lowered.

Oh, yes, we Bank Line men were well aware of our place in the grand scheme of things.

Keith

Keith that is so funny and the photo to round it off too...still laughing!
God bless Bank Line ships and the Hooghly.

Barrie Youde
17th March 2013, 21:40
#198,

Steve,

Whoever posted 177 owes an apology to JMCG. It was a disgraceful thing to be said of anybody.

Best,

Barrie

joe732
17th March 2013, 21:44
Nothing more distasteful than an 'old bullet maker' sitting back stoking the flames of unrest.

No need to apologise for your inexperience or questionable qualifications.
If the hat fits wear it. I imagine it fits you very well.

Captan Bill

Can you elaborate on what experience or qualifications that I may need in order to exchange 'hat wearing' with such an exulted and experienced 'old man' such as your self?.

joe732
17th March 2013, 21:55
Anyone got any evidence that this is BD, how many times can an individual keep joining a site under different names?

One for the moderators perhaps.

No one else seems to be fooled.

jmcg
17th March 2013, 21:56
I am in no way offended by the remark.

I am happy and content with my lot - and I have achieved a great deal more than I could ever dream of. My conscience is clear and I can hold my head high - shamelessly.

Thany you for your concern Mr Youde.

BW

J(Gleam)(Gleam)

oldseamerchant
17th March 2013, 22:19
Captan Bill

Can you elaborate on what experience or qualifications that I may need in order to exchange 'hat wearing' with such an exulted and experienced 'old man' such as your self?.

You consistently make the statement, you know this, and therefore must feel vulnerable. I don't care about you!

I am here to talk ships not get caught up in some vendetta you and you ilk are engaged in.

joe732
17th March 2013, 22:22
Captan Bill

Can you elaborate on what experience or qualifications that I may need in order to exchange 'hat wearing' with such an exulted and experienced 'old man' such as your self?.

Again

You obviously care enough to reply to me and my ilk.

oldseamerchant
17th March 2013, 22:23
YI don't care about you!

I am here to talk ships not get caught up in some vendetta you and you ilk are engaged in.

Again!

joe732
17th March 2013, 22:30
Again!

Yaaaaawn!!!...

After 40 years at sea, do you have anything of interest to add?

jmcg
17th March 2013, 22:39
50 years Joe - same as Bill Davies.

BW

J(Gleam)(Gleam)

joe732
17th March 2013, 22:43
50 years Joe - same as Bill Davies.

BW

J(Gleam)(Gleam)

That's good

Like to talk ships? [=P]

John Dryden
17th March 2013, 22:49
Oh there,s hell on here..worse than a party in the the sparkies cabin alongside!

jmcg
17th March 2013, 22:59
No, no John - Sparkies are always civil and devoid of rancour.

A bit like AB's really.(*))(*))

BW

J(Gleam)(Gleam)

joe732
17th March 2013, 23:02
Oh there,s hell on here..worse than a party in the the sparkies cabin alongside!

John

Hope it wasn't some kind of vendetta? (K)

Aberdonian
17th March 2013, 23:21
Keith that is so funny and the photo to round it off too...still laughing!
God bless Bank Line ships and the Hooghly.

Good to see somebody on this thread enjoying a laugh today, John.
Maybe grouchiness is due to the passing Ides of March, or somethin'

Keith

John Dryden
17th March 2013, 23:29
No absolutely no rancour or a vendetta, it,s just that when tied up it was odd to be having a drink with the sparkie in his cabin as usually they were the first ashore and away..so when we did catch 'em it was always a good night for some reason.

joe732
17th March 2013, 23:41
You consistently make the statement, you know this, and therefore must feel vulnerable. I don't care about you!

I am here to talk ships not get caught up in some vendetta you and you ilk are engaged in.

That's a shame.

Here was me feeling vulnerable and hoping you could give me a 'good night' cuddle.

Bill....
Bill........
Bill..............

John Briggs
18th March 2013, 00:37
Oh dear, I'm now very sorry that I ever mentioned tramp ships as
I seem to have opened a can of worms and let loose the dogs of war.
I never quite realised that tramp ships were regarded with such opprobrium.
I did however realise that some people considered flags of convenience to be substandard.
What about these so called cruise liners then? The majority are registed in
Panama and the Bahamas and change their ports of call as the market dictates.
Should we not class these vessels as FOC tramp ships?
As stated previously I was proud of my time in tramps!

Cisco
18th March 2013, 01:10
Yep, all your fault John......

Re them big white things that carry self loading cargo hither and yon..... they don't do 'line' voyages so should just be 'cruise ships'.

I never considered Bank Line to be a 'liner company' but I never considered them to be tramps either. Just a company engaged in what I suppose would be called the cross trades many of whose ships never went home. A bit like the Bakke boats....

K Morley
18th March 2013, 02:06
[IAre there any firemen from the "HAZEL BANK"out there I fired her Aucklaand to the Islands for phosphfate then Lyttelton for bunkers.....payed off..

Barrie Youde
18th March 2013, 08:50
There is a difference between tramping and a liner service which has nothing to do with opprobrium nor malice of any kind.

The difference is the time factor - which is critical in any liner service but which is usually absent from tramping. Wherever there is a schedule to be kept, time becomes vital and the pressure on every aspect of operation becomes so much the greater.

As to any opprobrium, it might be said that the liner operator, trying his utmost to maintain standards when under pressure, is guilty of greed. In order to succeed, he needs to balance those two points - commercial greed and the maintenance of operational standards.

If moral judgment enters into consideration at all, it might be said that tramping is morally superior, as the tramp has the greater time available in which to conduct all necessary maintenance.

As to pride, most of us are proud of what we have done and most of us know what it is like to be put in our place from time to time.

At #216, John is no doubt right that many a modern cruise liner is de-facto an FOC tramp. It might even be suggested that the expression "cruise liner" is a contradiction in terms!

Barrie Youde
18th March 2013, 10:49
The reality, of course, is that although the tramp by definition has greater flexibility of time in which to carry out maintenance, in all too many cases (but not all, I hasten to add) maintenance of standards is unlikely to be carried out. This is particularly so in FOC ships, as is only too well known.

The point of all this in the context of Bank Line is that nobody could accuse Bank Line (in my own experience) of any lack of maintenance. All was kept properly in order, from stem to stern and including the saloon table!

Cisco
18th March 2013, 11:17
At #216, John is no doubt right that many a modern cruise liner is de-facto an FOC tramp.

I beg to differ..... SLCBs ( Self Loading Cargo Boats ) have their schedules laid out years in advance so hardly tramping.

I was told 50 years ago that true 'tramping' no longer existed. Lots of 'tramp' companies had regular trades... Reardon Smith's interests out of the NW USA; Dalgleish and the Churchill trade etc etc.
On the other hand Stricks , as I recall, had a scheduled liner service out to the Gulf but often 'tramped' home... sugar from Mauritius I think was a common one ... I once saw a Strick's boat ( circa 1960 ) going up to Geelong to load grain....

Barrie Youde
18th March 2013, 11:34
#221

Point taken.

There is, however, a strong argument that cruising and clock-watching are incompatible!

John Briggs
18th March 2013, 13:18
I think Cisco has nailed it in #217 and #221.

China hand
18th March 2013, 19:50
Liner berth runs from Cal to South America, East or West. Tramp charter back to anywhere in the world. Smashin' stuff.

Aberdonian
18th March 2013, 22:03
Unlikely as it sounds, I was told way back that original tramping was where Masters in far flung ports arranged their own charters and freight terms with shippers on behalf of the Owners. The Owners, in turn, followed the custom of conceding a limited amount of cargo space for said Master to utilise for his personal gain.
Something like that.

Keith

R651400
19th March 2013, 09:43
..... how many times can an individual keep joining a site under different names?You're not serious Steve?
Doesn't SN have a prophylactic for this malady or is it as many times as the individual wishes?

jmcg
19th March 2013, 11:19
Anyone who feels it necessary to have multiple accounts is not only a devious person but is seriously inadequate mentally.

No place for the type on S/N surely?

BW

J(Gleam)(Gleam)

duquesa
19th March 2013, 12:12
You're not serious Steve?

Study the posts!! :@

China hand
19th March 2013, 20:13
IF you got your CP in time ( unusual), then it was 5%molo, always +, a yarn with the Chief, 10% over good weather or 25% general reserve? Mate: water? Chief:Atlas? Call Panama agent: depth over Gatun cill. Yup . ok 75000 mt hard winter wheat. Holds passed? GO.
That is tramping. Loved it.

emmo
31st March 2013, 07:11
I am trying to get onto the Bank Line site but having trouble - Catch 22??

Do you know of Ron Darling who was electrician on Avonbank in early 60's.

Would you kindly forward my email address to him & request that he contacts me, please.

Thanks, Len Emerick

emerick@tpg.com.au

Waighty
1st April 2013, 14:23
Just to bring a tear to the eye. (Sad)

Weirbank seven bells smoko
Weirbank homeward bound
Sprucebank at Lae and a last walk ashore before leaving for San Francisco
Sprucebank crossing the North Sea Hamburg to Hull viewed from the area mentioned
Weirbank on a quiet evening just before dinner on the way arcross the Pacific

I'm another one like Alastair who remembers the not so good bits but prefers the rose tinted glasses point of view at this point in my history. (Thumb)

What was Paul Yuill like to sail with? He and I were cadets in Ben Line together and I know he also did a trip on MacAndrews' "Pacheco" circa 1970. At some point he must have joined Bank Line then. I know he fell out big time with his father, floored him if memory serves, but what happened after that I don't know, we lost contact.

joe732
11th April 2013, 19:12
Anyone got any evidence that this is BD, how many times can an individual keep joining a site under different names?

Any idea where Old Sea Merchant is these days?