Food Glorious Food.....!!

buddy123
15th August 2009, 22:02
I was just thinking about the phrase ''God provides the food and the devil provides the cooks!!'' as I understand is sometimes quoted on board ship. I remember some really good meals provided during the times I was able to accompany my father at sea. The only downside was 'Brown Windsor Soup' but home made bread was fantastic. Just wondered if anyone else had any galley gastronomie memories good or bad !

kevjacko
16th August 2009, 21:36
Aaah Buddy,

Now it depends on each cooks interpretation of Brown Windsor soup. Done well it could be a meal in itself, a saviour to the deck crowd during cold tie up's with a fresh bread roll. Done poorly and it could taste like last weeks greasy gravy with a handfull of frozen veg chucked in, (thats coz it was). lol Often depended on how much time the cook had and what he had available / left over.

buddy123
16th August 2009, 21:47
Aaah Buddy,

Now it depends on each cooks interpretation of Brown Windsor soup. Done well it could be a meal in itself, a saviour to the deck crowd during cold tie up's with a fresh bread roll. Done poorly and it could taste like last weeks greasy gravy with a handfull of frozen veg chucked in, (thats coz it was). lol Often depended on how much time the cook had and what he had available / left over.

I think I must have had the old gravy version!! a memorable taste if ever there was one!!(EEK)

kudu
20th August 2009, 20:39
Hello Buddy123
A belated welcome to our site. I was an apprentice in Stag line from 1965 until 1969.I remember your father although I never sailed with him as captain.Brown Windsor soup was a regular on the Gloxinia together with sea pie,Old Man Jas Shaws favourite.The only daughter I sailed with was Andy Melvilles our chief steward in 1966/67.
Kudu.

buddy123
20th August 2009, 21:02
Hello Buddy123
A belated welcome to our site. I was an apprentice in Stag line from 1965 until 1969.I remember your father although I never sailed with him as captain.Brown Windsor soup was a regular on the Gloxinia together with sea pie,Old Man Jas Shaws favourite.The only daughter I sailed with was Andy Melvilles our chief steward in 1966/67.
Kudu.

Thanks so much for your reply-I was only 10yrs old in '66 but I still remember the soup. I also recall my dad referring to Captain Shaw-sea pie being fish in white sauce with mashed potato topping ? If the stores ran out of fish a few lines over the side could make up the difference I guess!! (Wave) .
Kind regards,
Marise.

buddy123
20th August 2009, 21:04
Hello Buddy123
A belated welcome to our site. I was an apprentice in Stag line from 1965 until 1969.I remember your father although I never sailed with him as captain.Brown Windsor soup was a regular on the Gloxinia together with sea pie,Old Man Jas Shaws favourite.The only daughter I sailed with was Andy Melvilles our chief steward in 1966/67.
Kudu.

P.S. Do you remember the little bottles of Tabasco sauce always on the table-maybe to disguise the soup taste!!LOL!!

ALAN TYLER
9th July 2010, 12:05
Just been looking through my old "Nautical Cookery Book" and came across this savoury, "Mock Crab" 4oz grated cheese, 1/2 oz butter, 1 t/spoon mustard, 1 tablespoon vinegar and salt& pepper to taste. mix all the ingredients together and use as required. Suitable for sandwiches or placed on fancy cut pieces of toast. I think thats using the term "mock" to the limit!!

Gulpers
9th July 2010, 13:13
....... I think thats using the term "mock" to the limit!!

Indeed! [=P]

Donald McGhee
10th July 2010, 00:22
One of Donaldson's favourites, at least on the Colina, where we had a French Cook, was "Kromeskis a la Rouse" A sort of 1960's spud pattie with "bits" in it. Not bad.
Donaldsons were good feeders, at least the wee ships I sailed on were. The breakfasts were very good.
Bank Line could be a bit variable, to say the least, but as a curry lover I was in my element. Chips with breakfast and lots of great omellettes. Nothing flash, just good staple tucker, with the curries for a touch of the exotic, or dysenteric, dependent on your constitution.
Seems we all survived though or else the topic would never be raised?
(Thumb)

Burned Toast
11th July 2010, 14:42
Still a favourite today,Only I like them made with spicey minced chicken and wrapped in streaky bacon deep fried with beer batter and a hot sauce[=P](K)(egg)

BOB GARROCH
11th July 2010, 16:11
What has happened to HP sauce I havent tasted HP sauce for a few years, so I poured some over my eggs and bacon. What a bloody awfull taste. I checked the bottle and it is made in the Netherlands now. What happened to the Birmingham factory?. This was not HP sauce of the old days.

John Dryden
11th July 2010, 16:41
They closed the sauce factory in Brum a few years ago and moved production to Holland,caused a huge outcry at the time.Maybe the recipe changed or the ingredients were not mixed the same?

cueball44
11th July 2010, 17:47
I was just thinking about the phrase ''God provides the food and the devil provides the cooks!!'' as I understand is sometimes quoted on board ship. I remember some really good meals provided during the times I was able to accompany my father at sea. The only downside was 'Brown Windsor Soup' but home made bread was fantastic. Just wondered if anyone else had any galley gastronomie memories good or bad !My first years on trawlers,We had a cook nicknamed 'Bubble&Squeek' because thats all you got, When we reached the fishing grounds we had a choice, Fish&chips or Bubble&Squeek,If we were lucky and the weather was good we could have some Onion Duff or Jam Duff with our Bubble&Squeek,Through the night while he was turned in, We had cold cooked fish,Maybe some cheese and bread,But there was always a big tray of cold Bubble&Squeek on offer.(Ouch)'cueball44'

John Dryden
11th July 2010, 17:53
Bubble and squeak is a delicacy now cueball,served in the finest restaurants and even sold frozen now.I love it made with cabbage or sprouts and fried nearly black.

cueball44
11th July 2010, 19:30
Bubble and squeak is a delicacy now cueball,served in the finest restaurants and even sold frozen now.I love it made with cabbage or sprouts and fried nearly black.I did'nt say i disliked it,But if you were having a trip off and your misses put it on the table every day,I think you would have a word in her ear,Of course non of us dared tell him or ask him if we could have a bit of variety on account of him being a big lad, and he always had one of those enormous ladles hanging off his belt.(egg)'cueball44'

notnila
12th July 2010, 22:17
Onion Duff?I sailed with a 2nd Cook&Baker in the"Abadesa"who claimed his speciality was Onion Duff.C/Steward would never allow him to put it on.He'd get into a strop, and mumble about "not being allowed to cook to his potential."Result is I've never tasted it!What have I missed?
Regards
Arch

cueball44
12th July 2010, 23:51
Onion Duff?I sailed with a 2nd Cook&Baker in the"Abadesa"who claimed his speciality was Onion Duff.C/Steward would never allow him to put it on.He'd get into a strop, and mumble about "not being allowed to cook to his potential."Result is I've never tasted it!What have I missed?
Regards
ArchWell its made just the same as 'Jam Duff' But obviously with 'Onions', When i sailed on trawlers out of 'HULL UK' we had it often, It was used as a filler,And it did just that, It was tasty, The cook would knock it up instead of yorkshire puds because we did not carry many eggs, A nice big wedge of onion duff with whatever meat dish you were having, With some thick onion gravy over it, Soon filled&warmed you up after you had come off the cold wet deck.(Thumb)'cueball44'

Burned Toast
13th July 2010, 11:57
Onion Duff?I sailed with a 2nd Cook&Baker in the"Abadesa"who claimed his speciality was Onion Duff.C/Steward would never allow him to put it on.He'd get into a strop, and mumble about "not being allowed to cook to his potential."Result is I've never tasted it!What have I missed?
Regards
Arch

Very nice served with pot Roast Beef[=P][=D]

Pat Kennedy
13th July 2010, 20:29
Beef a la mode was a pet hate of mine while I was at sea, and come to think of it, I've never ever seen it on a menu shoreside.
Was it a way of utilising cheap and nasty cuts of beef and mouldy old carrots, dreamed up by cheeseparing chief grocers and cooks?

Pat(Thumb)

Lksimcoe
14th July 2010, 18:46
Note to self: Do not read this thread while eating your lunch,

Donald McGhee
15th July 2010, 00:45
Takes me back some of the mentions in this thread. I still maintain that a good breakfast is the best way to start the day.
Alas the food and drink police has decreed that I am expanding at a rate unacceptable to her and must rein in my appetite for eggs, bacon, black pud, tomatoes and sausages. Only at weekends now.

Bank Line brekkies were awesome, chips and omellettes, as previously stated were just sublime.

cueball44
15th July 2010, 01:09
Takes me back some of the mentions in this thread. I still maintain that a good breakfast is the best way to start the day.
Alas the food and drink police has decreed that I am expanding at a rate unacceptable to her and must rein in my appetite for eggs, bacon, black pud, tomatoes and sausages. Only at weekends now.

Bank Line brekkies were awesome, chips and omellettes, as previously stated were just sublime.Sounds tasty, As soon as the weather starts to cool, I will be getting a big pan of Shackles on the go, Rubbing my little hands together while i am watching it bubble away.(Thumb)'cueball44'

RayJordandpo
15th July 2010, 23:38
Bubble and squeak is a delicacy now cueball,served in the finest restaurants and even sold frozen now.I love it made with cabbage or sprouts and fried nearly black.

When I was young my mother always made 'Bubble and Squeak' on Mondays which was traditionally 'wash day' when the main laundry for the week was done. It was mainly leftovers from the veg of the previous day's Sunday roast. With a slighty crispy coating and smothered in brown sauce I loved it. Incidentally as John quite rightly says it is now a delicacy in top class restaurants, in a smart eaterie recently I had a delicious meal of belly pork served on a bed of bubble and squeak.

john fraser
16th July 2010, 08:48
When I was young my mother always made 'Bubble and Squeak' on Mondays which was traditionally 'wash day' when the main laundry for the week was done. It was mainly leftovers from the veg of the previous day's Sunday roast. With a slighty crispy coating and smothered in brown sauce I loved it. Incidentally as John quite rightly says it is now a delicacy in top class restaurants, in a smart eaterie recently I had a delicious meal of belly pork served on a bed of bubble and squeak.

So.You were a vegetarian on a Monday ,Ray. That is actually where"Stovies" originated in the North East of Scotland.It was Sunday leftovers for Monday wash day.Then various parts of Scotland invented their own stovies.

Bob Murdoch
16th July 2010, 11:24
Takes me back some of the mentions in this thread. I still maintain that a good breakfast is the best way to start the day.
Alas the food and drink police has decreed that I am expanding at a rate unacceptable to her and must rein in my appetite for eggs, bacon, black pud, tomatoes and sausages. Only at weekends now.

Bank Line brekkies were awesome, chips and omellettes, as previously stated were just sublime.

You got problems, Donald. Mine is a dietician. I cant remember what a cooked breakfast tastes like. Still, going on a quick visit to Scotland in October, alone, only trouble is I will be staying with my brother and they are vegematarians, in fact she, his boss, is a vegan.
Cheers, Bob

Donald McGhee
21st July 2010, 06:58
You got problems, Donald. Mine is a dietician. I cant remember what a cooked breakfast tastes like. Still, going on a quick visit to Scotland in October, alone, only trouble is I will be staying with my brother and they are vegematarians, in fact she, his boss, is a vegan.
Cheers, Bob

Excuse the pun, but not exactly out of the frying pan into the fire is it? They probably don't have a frying pan!.

My heart goes out to you my friend, as I just love my big breakfasts.

Slainte(Pint)

Satanic Mechanic
21st July 2010, 08:49
Just on the subject of bread and pastry - here is a quick question.

Was there something in ships flour, like a preservative?

The reason I ask is that no matter the cook or the company, the vessel made bread and pastry had a 'taste' to it. Not a bad taste as such but quite a distinctive one nevertheless and one I have never experienced in shoreside or homemade bread, it has been common througout my career. Don't get me wrong still loved the bread but I am 100% sure that I could pick out a ship baked loaf out of selection put in front of me.

Any of you cooks out there shed any light on it or is it just my weird sense of taste.

Bob Murdoch
21st July 2010, 10:42
QUOTE=Donald McGhee;442128]Excuse the pun, but not exactly out of the fryi [ng pan into the fire is it? They probably don't have a frying pan!.

My heart goes out to you my friend, as I just love my big breakfasts.

Slainte(Pint)[/QUOTE]

Thanks Donald,
Any food parcels can be sent to a PO Box for up-picking!!
Bob (Sad)

Burned Toast
21st July 2010, 15:49
Just on the subject of bread and pastry - here is a quick question.

Was there something in ships flour, like a preservative?

The reason I ask is that no matter the cook or the company, the vessel made bread and pastry had a 'taste' to it. Not a bad taste as such but quite a distinctive one nevertheless and one I have never experienced in shoreside or homemade bread, it has been common througout my career. Don't get me wrong still loved the bread but I am 100% sure that I could pick out a ship baked loaf out of selection put in front of me.

Any of you cooks out there shed any light on it or is it just my weird sense of taste.


No difference in the flour that was supplied the ship or Bakery, mind I would imagine the bread you get from the shops do have additives in to make it last
longer. And ship's bread was made with love and care for the boys[=D]B\)

Ray

R798780
21st July 2010, 17:03
One of Donaldson's favourites, at least on the Colina, where we had a French Cook, was "Kromeskis a la Rouse" A sort of 1960's spud pattie with "bits" in it. Not bad.
Donaldsons were good feeders, at least the wee ships I sailed on were. The breakfasts were very good.
Bank Line could be a bit variable, to say the least, but as a curry lover I was in my element. Chips with breakfast and lots of great omellettes. Nothing flash, just good staple tucker, with the curries for a touch of the exotic, or dysenteric, dependent on your constitution.
Seems we all survived though or else the topic would never be raised?
(Thumb)

Ah! Kromeskie a la Rouse. Sausage meat wrapped in bacon and deep fried in batter. Loved them.
And Tournedos of Beef, Sausage meat wrapped in braising beef and served with a rich gravy.

Burned Toast
21st July 2010, 17:49
Ah! Kromeskie a la Rouse. Sausage meat wrapped in bacon and deep fried in batter. Loved them.
And Tournedos of Beef, Sausage meat wrapped in braising beef and served with a rich gravy.

I think you mean beef olives[=P]

Never mind you enjoyed them(K)


Ray

TonyAllen
21st July 2010, 18:45
No difference in the flour that was supplied the ship or Bakery, mind I would imagine the bread you get from the shops do have additives in to make it last
longer. And ship's bread was made with love and care for the boys[=D]B\)

Ray

I always thought that the flour was plain flour and the baker added his own yeast and salt to make it Rise,but the good baker always knocked it down twice to make it firm and crusty then let it stand for 1 hour before butter got near it. The crap bread you get from the so called baked in our own bakery in supermarkets arrive already mixed and just put the oven to comply with with the advert. Tony

Burned Toast
21st July 2010, 19:18
I always thought that the flour was plain flour and the baker added his own yeast and salt to make it Rise,but the good baker always knocked it down twice to make it firm and crusty then let it stand for 1 hour before butter got near it. The crap bread you get from the so called baked in our own bakery in supermarkets arrive already mixed and just put the oven to comply with with the advert. Tony

Tony

I was talking about flour not how to make bread, When you get a sack of flour it's just a sack of flour. If you want to know about what's added to make bread well it's -Yeast - salt -Butter -Water-whatever.

All Chefs -Cooks - Bakers have their own way of making bread. (egg)

TonyAllen
21st July 2010, 19:33
BT I stand corrected Tony

John Dryden
21st July 2010, 19:37
I have to say the bread in Bank Line was not too good,dry and a tinge of grey as I remember but the toast was ok with a nice cup of tea in the morning.It never tasted of that unmistakable taste of freshly baked bread.

Burned Toast
21st July 2010, 19:54
I have to say the bread in Bank Line was not too good,dry and a tinge of grey as I remember but the toast was OK with a nice cup of tea in the morning.It never tasted of that unmistakable taste of freshly baked bread.

Unfortunately Bank line Vessels carried Indian crew. Bread or Western Pasties were not their normal diet.

Grey bread never seen that so cannot comment.

Ray

John Dryden
21st July 2010, 20:07
I think that was the problem Ray,I once had an incident with the cook about Yorkshire puddings and ended up with my tail between my legs,as you do when you argue with the cook,live and learn!

Burned Toast
21st July 2010, 20:13
I think that was the problem Ray,I once had an incident with the cook about Yorkshire puddings and ended up with my tail between my legs,as you do when you argue with the cook,live and learn!

John

I have had some good inspirations over the years from top to bottom on ships you should always be ready to listen and learn if its better than your way[=D]

Mind some will not agree:sweat:

Ray

R798780
21st July 2010, 22:55
[QUOTE=Burned Toast;442235]I think you mean beef olives[=P]

Never mind you enjoyed them(K)


Ray[/QU

I believe you're right - a senior moment at lunch time. And I should know better. Tournedos Energos was a fillet steak over a circle of toast with pt above and a large mushroom on top. Next trip on the Lumiere it was called Tournedos Lumiere.

But tonight I had Hamburg Steak Malabar, a (real beef) hamburger with a fried egg on top. May have been unique to Brocklebanks after the ship named Malabar. (why must they rename it a beefburger, I suppose you could have a lamb hamburger or a pork hamburger, but a proper hamburger is beef. There now, I've had my little rant!!)

kevjacko
27th July 2010, 17:50
Just on the subject of bread and pastry - here is a quick question.

Was there something in ships flour, like a preservative?

The reason I ask is that no matter the cook or the company, the vessel made bread and pastry had a 'taste' to it. Not a bad taste as such but quite a distinctive one nevertheless and one I have never experienced in shoreside or homemade bread, it has been common througout my career. Don't get me wrong still loved the bread but I am 100% sure that I could pick out a ship baked loaf out of selection put in front of me.

Any of you cooks out there shed any light on it or is it just my weird sense of taste.


Could be SM that the majority of the time on BP ships the yeast used was fresh. It was'nt until the 80's we got the luxury of dried yeast. Also if you were Ozz Trading the flour there had a very low gluten content and therefore was very soft. Good for cakes bad for bread. The gluten was put in as an additive to make bread flour.

Different 2nd cooks used different fermentation methods for the yeast and proving methods for the dough this along with the number of times they knocked back would give different outcomes. Oh and don't forget, the engineers stock all added to the flavour. How goods your water making???

Satanic Mechanic
27th July 2010, 18:24
Could be SM that the majority of the time on BP ships the yeast used was fresh. It was'nt until the 80's we got the luxury of dried yeast. Also if you were Ozz Trading the flour there had a very low gluten content and therefore was very soft. Good for cakes bad for bread. The gluten was put in as an additive to make bread flour.

Different 2nd cooks used different fermentation methods for the yeast and proving methods for the dough this along with the number of times they knocked back would give different outcomes. Oh and don't forget, the engineers stock all added to the flavour. How goods your water making???

My water was as pure as v.........erm - it was pretty damn pure ok ;)

Not sure Kev - as i think about it I would say it was more noticable in cakes rather than bread. As I say loved it all but it was distinctive - it may well just have been me

Chief Engineer's Daughter
27th July 2010, 18:46
When you get a sack of flour it's just a sack of flour.

Oh dear, let me tell you that isn't the case.

Basics:
Plain flour; for making mainly pastries, yorkshire puds, biscuits etc. Add raising agents to it (Bicarbonate of soda or baking powder) and make cakes.
Self Raising flour; Plain flour with the raising agents added thus taking out the guess work (LOL). Usually used to make cakes.
Bread Flour; High in gluten, which combined with yeast, water, oil and salt makes bread!

Different types of wheat are grown for these purposes. Big commercial bread company tend to use a flour that is specifically designed to take on lots of water. Hence why your bought supermarket loaf is, to put it plainly, CR*P.

Try getting a good quality flour and have a go at making bread. It is a very therapeutic experience and fun to!

Billieboy
27th July 2010, 19:47
Talking about bread, one Sunday Morning at about 08.45 I arrived on board a VLOOC and the Chief Steward asked me if I could get a dozen white sliced loaves on board asap. On a Sunday morning at 09.00 in Holland? One phone call and fifteen minutes later, the bread arrived.

You can get anything in Rotterdam, at any time.....!

john fraser
27th July 2010, 20:12
Tony

I was talking about flour not how to make bread, When you get a sack of flour it's just a sack of flour. If you want to know about what's added to make bread well it's -Yeast - salt -Butter -Water-whatever.

All Chefs -Cooks - Bakers have their own way of making bread. (egg)If the flour was supplied in the UK it was an all purpose flour specially for ships use.produced by Spillers,if I remember.The problem arose when the flour was purchased in other countries,e.g. Australia,the flour was not much good for breadmaking,Ok for cakes .Canadian winter flour was always a good flour for bread making.

John Cassels
27th July 2010, 20:30
Talking about bread, one Sunday Morning at about 08.45 I arrived on board a VLOOC and the Chief Steward asked me if I could get a dozen white sliced loaves on board asap. On a Sunday morning at 09.00 in Holland? One phone call and fifteen minutes later, the bread arrived.

You can get anything in Rotterdam, at any time.....!

Couln't get a plate of steak & kidney pie at the city marina restaurant
last weekend !!.

Pat Kennedy
27th July 2010, 21:42
Oh dear, let me tell you that isn't the case.

Basics:
Plain flour; for making mainly pastries, yorkshire puds, biscuits etc. Add raising agents to it (Bicarbonate of soda or baking powder) and make cakes.
Self Raising flour; Plain flour with the raising agents added thus taking out the guess work (LOL). Usually used to make cakes.
Bread Flour; High in gluten, which combined with yeast, water, oil and salt makes bread!

Different types of wheat are grown for these purposes. Big commercial bread company tend to use a flour that is specifically designed to take on lots of water. Hence why your bought supermarket loaf is, to put it plainly, CR*P.

Try getting a good quality flour and have a go at making bread. It is a very therapeutic experience and fun to!

As I understand it , Burned Toast was a ship's cook.
Here we have a Coastguard officer advising him to have a go at making bread!
Oh dear
Pat(Jester)

billy cruickshank
27th July 2010, 21:54
deviled kidney on toast

Billieboy
28th July 2010, 05:46
Couln't get a plate of steak & kidney pie at the city marina restaurant
last weekend !!.

The Dutch have something against steak and kidney pie, John, the Missus and the kids cannot stand the smell of it! Mind you, stoverij or stoofvlees,( Flemish braised steak and onions), is one of our favourites.

Burned Toast
28th July 2010, 11:13
As I understand it , Burned Toast was a ship's cook.
Here we have a Coastguard officer advising him to have a go at making bread!
Oh dear
Pat(Jester)

Never mind Pat I'm on lookout duties now(Jester)(Smoke)

Satanic Mechanic
28th July 2010, 11:24
The Dutch have something against steak and kidney pie, John, the Missus and the kids cannot stand the smell of it! Mind you, stoverij or stoofvlees,( Flemish braised steak and onions), is one of our favourites.

Thus proving that Dutch (and us Scots) ain't daft - can't think of a worse thing to do to a perfectly good and tasty Steak Pie than to infect it with Kidneys

billyboy
28th July 2010, 11:28
Cant beat homemade bread. I chuck a handfull of quaker oats and cracked wheat in when i do mine. makes nice tasty bread too!

John Cassels
28th July 2010, 19:18
Thus proving that Dutch (and us Scots) ain't daft - can't think of a worse thing to do to a perfectly good and tasty Steak Pie than to infect it with Kidneys

I beg your pardon !!!!. I am just as much a Scot as you are even
though I live over here.

The fact that I love steak and kidney pie does not make me any
less so.

Plenty storage space has been reserved in the caravan for enough of
the Fray Bentos beuties to keep me going until next year.

Satanic Mechanic
28th July 2010, 19:34
I beg your pardon !!!!. I am just as much a Scot as you are even
though I live over here.

The fact that I love steak and kidney pie does not make me any
less so.

Plenty storage space has been reserved in the caravan for enough of
the Fray Bentos beuties to keep me going until next year.

Come come now! surely you are not implying that a Fray Bentos steak and kidney pie is better than a Bells of Shotts steak pie (absolutely no kidneys) with that puff pastry which is soggy underneath(Hippy)

Satanic Mechanic
28th July 2010, 19:35
washed down with Irn Bru (Full Fat, glass bottle) of course

Billieboy
28th July 2010, 20:09
Wot about a floater then? can't get them over here either!

RayJordandpo
28th July 2010, 20:57
Excuse me if I'm wrong but wouldn't steak and kidney pie without kidneys be known as, errr now let me think , ah yes! - steak pie? :confused:

Just love steak and kidney pie with as much kidney as you can cram in it. Someone mentioned devilled kidneys on toast - lovely grub

borderreiver
28th July 2010, 21:04
come on chaps make your own. When I make a stake and kiddney pudding our French friends queue up for a invite plus all the puddings.

Satanic Mechanic
28th July 2010, 21:06
Why bother with the steak - just have a kidney pie - I'll put the extra steak in my no kidney pie(Thumb)

Burned Toast
28th July 2010, 21:31
If the flour was supplied in the UK it was an all purpose flour specially for ships use.produced by Spillers,if I remember.The problem arose when the flour was purchased in other countries,e.g. Australia,the flour was not much good for breadmaking,Ok for cakes .Canadian winter flour was always a good flour for bread making.

Afraid not Spillers all purpose flour was also supplied to bakery's as well, the best bread flour I ever came across was in Brasil. Aussie flour was OK it you had the gluten additives.

Canadian or USA Flour were also good for bread making.

When we took stores in the UK I would order twelve months supply for a crew of forty five, and when we were in a port were decent flour was available I would keep it topped up for the twelve months.(Smoke)

Ray
Galley Boy - Asst/Baker-2nd/Cook-Ch.Cook- Ch.Purser - Camp Boss
[=P] Love a bacon sarni with a good Stottie.

RayJordandpo
28th July 2010, 21:35
Why bother with the steak - just have a kidney pie - I'll put the extra steak in my no kidney pie(Thumb)

Brilliant! why didn't I think of that. Steak and kidney pie with no steak = kidney pie - now we are talking!
We could be on to something here. For vegetarians, how about steak and kidney pie with no steak and kidney. We could call it PIE

Satanic Mechanic
28th July 2010, 22:12
Brilliant! why didn't I think of that. Steak and kidney pie with no steak = kidney pie - now we are talking!
We could be on to something here. For vegetarians, how about steak and kidney pie with no steak and kidney. We could call it PIE


Surely Pie Pie

Burned Toast
28th July 2010, 22:20
Why bother with the steak - just have a kidney pie - I'll put the extra steak in my no kidney pie(Thumb)

Just have Ox kidneys with plenty of garlic and Chillies served with either rice or creamed potatoes(Thumb)

R798780
28th July 2010, 23:31
Surely Pie Pie

I think it could justifiably be called Air Pie

john fraser
29th July 2010, 09:30
Afraid not Spillers all purpose flour was also supplied to bakery's as well, the best bread flour I ever came across was in Brasil. Aussie flour was OK it you had the gluten additives.

Canadian or USA Flour were also good for bread making.

When we took stores in the UK I would order twelve months supply for a crew of forty five, and when we were in a port were decent flour was available I would keep it topped up for the twelve months.(Smoke)

Ray
Galley Boy - Asst/Baker-2nd/Cook-Ch.Cook- Ch.Purser - Camp Boss
[=P] Love a bacon sarni with a good Stottie.

Ray. Bet the crew were happy storing a years supply of flour,where did you manage to stow it all? and did the company not object.We used to take a 4 month store up of all foods ,then keep it topped up.If we used 2 months we topped up 2 months.I see you,ve much the same profile as myself.even the age.

John Cassels
29th July 2010, 09:44
Talking about stocking up in the UK ( please ignore SM and his anti-kidney
stance) , will further be reserving space in the caravan for the return journey -
in order of importance ;

Fray Bentos steak and kidney pies
Vesta chow mien
Grants haggis
Sage & onion stuffing.

All the nice little things you can't get over here.

cueball44
29th July 2010, 10:04
Never mind Corned Beef hash,Can anyone remember having Duck Hash?,'cueball44'.

Burned Toast
29th July 2010, 11:10
Ray. Bet the crew were happy storing a years supply of flour,where did you manage to stow it all? and did the company not object.We used to take a 4 month store up of all foods ,then keep it topped up.If we used 2 months we topped up 2 months.I see you,ve much the same profile as myself.even the age.

That was normal stores in the 60s and 70s from Dry dock till dry dock. just cannot imagine taking two months of anything in West Africa or India.

borderreiver
7th August 2010, 17:23
How about scot mists. another commons one.

BarnacleGrim
8th August 2010, 01:56
My best experience was in the South Pacific, a whole tuna brought over the poop, sliced and served in the mess. Just a little soy sauce and some rice.

muldonaich
8th August 2010, 19:54
How about scot mists. another commons one.can you explain ??????? kev.

degsy
8th August 2010, 23:30
After my first trip down West Africa the family asked the usual questions. Our Kid, my brother, asked what was the food like down there. I told him the most common West African dish was Poy. A food common to all the Countries of that coast. Liberia, Ghana, Sierra Leone etc etc. He asked what this Poy was like, I told him it depended on where you where. He then asked well give us an idea. So I told him.................. There is Pork Poy, Cheese and Onion Poy and of course Steak and Kidney Poy, still remember the look on his face as he told me to F **k Off, non to kindly. For those of you who may know him Jack Mullholland caught me with that one(Jester)(Jester)

BarnacleGrim
9th August 2010, 01:44
Afraid not Spillers all purpose flour was also supplied to bakery's as well, the best bread flour I ever came across was in Brasil. Aussie flour was OK it you had the gluten additives.

Canadian or USA Flour were also good for bread making.

When we took stores in the UK I would order twelve months supply for a crew of forty five, and when we were in a port were decent flour was available I would keep it topped up for the twelve months.(Smoke)

Ray
Galley Boy - Asst/Baker-2nd/Cook-Ch.Cook- Ch.Purser - Camp Boss
[=P] Love a bacon sarni with a good Stottie.
Interesting. Not long ago I made bread with some Canadian flour priced four times the local flour. At first I thought it was just another trick to fool gullible consumers, but it turned out to be the best bread I ever made. Used the same recipe a week later with cheap local flour, no comparison.

Lousy provisions must be incredibly frustrating for the cooks.

cookietwo
11th August 2010, 23:18
kidneys in a steak pie what a waste of a good pie only time i was threatened by the chief steward was when i refused to make steak and kidney pie i told him it was not how jocks eat

TonyAllen
12th August 2010, 00:28
kidneys in a steak pie what a waste of a good pie only time i was threatened by the chief steward was when i refused to make steak and kidney pie i told him it was not how jocks eat

Never mind jocks I, hated kidneys in a steak pie,for me it soured the steak and put me off big time Tony

BarnacleGrim
12th August 2010, 00:59
I had it once as a child and hated it, but now I have a feeling I should give it a try. What with all the other awful things I've come to enjoy. Must try haggis too. And fermented shark if I'm ever in Iceland.

jg grant
12th August 2010, 02:01
Hi guys, I've sat on a reef on Norfolk island South Pacific and ate raw kina (sea urchins) and raw mussels.Not bad but stay upwind of some one who eats kina. Funny, could never face the thought of eating tripe. Ronnie

alan ward
14th October 2011, 12:07
Beef a la mode was a pet hate of mine while I was at sea, and come to think of it, I've never ever seen it on a menu shoreside.
Was it a way of utilising cheap and nasty cuts of beef and mouldy old carrots, dreamed up by cheeseparing chief grocers and cooks?

Pat(Thumb)

Why was Beef a la Mode made with carrots and Apple Pie a la Mode with ice cream?

alan ward
14th October 2011, 12:09
Just on the subject of bread and pastry - here is a quick question.

Was there something in ships flour, like a preservative?

The reason I ask is that no matter the cook or the company, the vessel made bread and pastry had a 'taste' to it. Not a bad taste as such but quite a distinctive one nevertheless and one I have never experienced in shoreside or homemade bread, it has been common througout my career. Don't get me wrong still loved the bread but I am 100% sure that I could pick out a ship baked loaf out of selection put in front of me.

Any of you cooks out there shed any light on it or is it just my weird sense of taste.

The difference is that we didn`t fill the mix with chemicals to prolong its shelf life

alan ward
14th October 2011, 12:16
Come come now! surely you are not implying that a Fray Bentos steak and kidney pie is better than a Bells of Shotts steak pie (absolutely no kidneys) with that puff pastry which is soggy underneath(Hippy)


My Dad and I lived on our own for some time during my teens Goblin Hamburgers in gravy and Fray Bentos pies made regular and welcome appearances on our menu.
Yesterday in Makro(wholesaler)I saw cases of the pies at 1 a go,for one lovely minute I was reminded of our teas together and thought of buying some for the pub.Then commonsense prevailed.