Glenearn 1945-1946 Japan Kure

vonee
2nd September 2009, 08:06
Hi
I am Vonee and I live In Queensland Australia. My father was on the Glen Ern in Kure following the end of the 2nd World War and had been with the occupying forces in Horoshima.
Dad is now 83 and he told me a story about a young male orphan that was adopted as a 'mascot' if you will by the crew members on the Glen Ern. He has a photograph of this young fellow - Asian, probably about 12 years old.
From what I gather, the boy could have come from Singapore or Hong Kong and when Dad left the ship in Kure, the lad was still aboard.
Dad was reassigned to the Formidable and as far as I understand, sent back to England eventually.
The photo of this young orphan surrounded by pommy sailors has always struck my heart and I would dearly like to know what ever happened to him.
Has anyone any idea as to how I could start to find a paper trail?
Thanks!

billyboy
2nd September 2009, 09:51
Welcome aboard from the Philippines. enjoy all this great site has to offer

R58484956
2nd September 2009, 10:11
Greetings Vonee and welcome to SN on your first interesting posting. Bon voyage.

teb
2nd September 2009, 11:04
Hi Vonee- G'Day from WA - If I'm not mistaken I believe the ship you refer to is Glenearn (not Glen Ern) which saw service in the far east with the RN. She was handed back to her owners Glen Line in 1946 for restoration and on completion in 1947 sailed on first voyage to Australia she did in fact call at Brisbane, Isailed on her at this time as 1stR/O. Unfortunately I'm unable to help you with your quest to find out what happened to the young asian boy who was made mascot when your father served on her.However if I am correct about the spelling I hope this may help in your search. Regards _TEB

bert thompson
2nd September 2009, 15:49
Vonee welcome and what an interesting story. Do hope someone on here can assist in your query
Best wishes
Bert.

Hugh Ferguson
2nd September 2009, 18:59
www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/45590/ppuser/8509 (http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/45590/ppuser/8509)
Vonee, A warm welcome to Ships Nostalgia. As confirmed by Teb, the ship was H.M.S. Glenearn. I myself remember her as such before she returned to commercial service.
A book about the entire life of that ship was privately published in 1980. It was written by Alex Aiken who was the son of Lieut.Commander (E) A.C.L. Aiken., MBE, RNR (E stands for engineer) who was killed when an accident occurred on board.
I cannot advise whether it maybe possible to obtain a copy, but I believe it is a book which would be of much interest to you. I have a signed copy of the book and I can assure you that it is a beautifully produced record of the life of that splendid ship.
It was published by the author whose address I can pass on if you send me a private message.
It was dedicated to his mother, Jessie Russel Aiken, died 24th July,1979. Title of the book, "In Time of War"
The last letter I received from Alex (14th Sept.2002) stated that, "There are still some hundreds of copies of the Glenearn book presently deflecting the ceiling joists of our dining room. Orders are still trickling in at the rate of three per year."
It is an incredibly detailed account of the life of a ship and I'm so glad that I learned of its existence and was able to obtain a copy. Alex's telephone number in 1992 was 041 6372438 but whether it still is I would not know.
If I can be of further assistance send me a P.M. on this site. Regards, Hugh Ferguson.

For a splendid photograph of the Glenearn, taken by my friend John Callis, in Northfleet Hope outward bound for the Continent, click on the link.

benjidog
2nd September 2009, 23:37
Welcome from Lancashire - I hope you will enjoy the site.

Good luck with your enquiry and please tell us if you manage to track the lad down. I say lad but I guess he will be in his late 60s or 70s now.

Hugh Ferguson
14th September 2009, 18:42
Hi
I am Vonee and I live In Queensland Australia. My father was on the Glen Ern in Kure following the end of the 2nd World War and had been with the occupying forces in Horoshima.
Dad is now 83 and he told me a story about a young male orphan that was adopted as a 'mascot' if you will by the crew members on the Glen Ern. He has a photograph of this young fellow - Asian, probably about 12 years old.
From what I gather, the boy could have come from Singapore or Hong Kong and when Dad left the ship in Kure, the lad was still aboard.
Dad was reassigned to the Formidable and as far as I understand, sent back to England eventually.
The photo of this young orphan surrounded by pommy sailors has always struck my heart and I would dearly like to know what ever happened to him.
Has anyone any idea as to how I could start to find a paper trail?
Thanks!

Vonee, If it was the case that you were not successful in finding your way back to your "hello" thread on the Glenearn click HERE (http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/showthread.php?t=29054)

gdynia
14th September 2009, 23:26
Welcome onboard to SN and enjoy the voyage

John Earley
25th September 2009, 00:30
www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/45590/ppuser/8509 (http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/45590/ppuser/8509)Vonee, A warm welcome to Ships Nostalgia. As confirmed by Teb, the ship was H.M.S. Glenearn. I myself remember her as such before she returned to commercial service.
A book about the entire life of that ship was privately published in 1980. It was written by Alex Aiken who was the son of Lieut.Commander (E) A.C.L. Aiken., MBE, RNR (E stands for engineer) who was killed when an accident occurred on board.
I cannot advise whether it maybe possible to obtain a copy, but I believe it is a book which would be of much interest to you. I have a signed copy of the book and I can assure you that it is a beautifully produced record of the life of that splendid ship.
It was published by the author whose address I can pass on if you send me a private message.
It was dedicated to his mother, Jessie Russel Aiken, died 24th July,1979. Title of the book, "In Time of War"
The last letter I received from Alex (14th Sept.2002) stated that, "There are still some hundreds of copies of the Glenearn book presently deflecting the ceiling joists of our dining room. Orders are still trickling in at the rate of three per year."
It is an incredibly detailed account of the life of a ship and I'm so glad that I learned of its existence and was able to obtain a copy. Alex's telephone number in 1992 was 041 6372438 but whether it still is I would not know.
If I can be of further assistance send me a P.M. on this site. Regards, Hugh Ferguson.

For a splendid photograph of the Glenearn, taken by my friend John Callis, in Northfleet Hope outward bound for the Continent, click on the link.

Hugh I'm glad to have found this thread .

My Father John Earley served on the Glenearn from Feb 43 to 46 I believe. (I'll check in the morning)

Dad was contacted by Alex Aiken and he contributed quite a lot accounts including some photos. If you look in the Addendum I believe my Father's contribution is acknowledged.

My Father lent his copy some years ago to his good friend and shipmate Len Nicholls. I have found a copy in the USA after much searching which I purchased yesterday as a surprise gift for my Father.

Sadly My Father’s once excellent memory is now fading fast and his short term memory is almost gone. He can still recall much of the D-Day landings and other episodes in the Glenearn’s war time exploits. Today I managed to record two short video sessions one of which was about the terrific explosions on board due to the high octane fuel used by the LTA’s ?

My Father is now staying with me as his short term memory problems are now quite severe however I know he would welcome any contact from anyone who wishes to reminisce about the Glen line ships or ask any questions about the 1942-46 period ,especially the D-Day landings.

Tomorrow I will endeavor to upload the video recordings I made today. Over the next weeks and months I intend to try to fill in any gaps in the Glenearn’s history during this period and also seek out any further unseen photos of the ship my Father has in his possession .

I would welcome hearing from anyone in connection with this.

Kind regards
Nick Earley (Son)

teb
25th September 2009, 16:16
Greetings Nick I wonder whether your father could answer the query from Vonee(who started this thread) about the Asian Boy adopted as amascot on Glenearn during her time in Kure1945/46? I'm sure she would be delighted to receive any info. regards Teb

Hugh Ferguson
26th September 2009, 08:09
Teb, Vonee appears to have disappeared-you gave the impression you knew she was a woman; can you throw any light on this? I have Alex Aiken's 'phone number and had thought of giving him a call today to see if he knew of any Glenearn mascot. How are you old ship-mate, well I trust.
Regards, Hugh

Hugh Ferguson
26th September 2009, 11:53
Teb, Vonee appears to have disappeared-you gave the impression you knew she was a woman; can you throw any light on this? I have Alex Aiken's 'phone number and had thought of giving him a call today to see if he knew of any Glenearn mascot. How are you old ship-mate, well I trust.
Regards, Hugh

The result of my call this morning was to learn that Alex died six years ago.
I had a long chat with his widow, Jeanette, and she remembered the visit she and Alex made to us here in Cornwall some fifteen years ago.
If anyone is interested in Alex's book about the Glenearn, "In Time of War", she is prepared to sell a brand new copy for 18. She indicated that for anyone having a personal connection with that ship she would be prepared to offer it as a gift-exclusive of postage costs to anyone outside of the U.K., the same applies to the 18 offer.
Please PM me for Jeanette's (possibly spelt Janette) 'phone number and address

Despite the title of the book the life of this ship is portrayed in great detail from construction at the Caledon yard in Dundee, commencing 14th Ap.1937 to demolition in Kaohsiung 10th Jan.1971. There can be very few ships the history of which exists in such minute detail. The book is in fact a memorial to the author's father who had been chief engineer in her when he was killed in the disasterous petrol explosion occurring whilst the ship had been operating, during the war, as H.M.S. Glenearn. She was some ship, they don't build them like that anymore!!

Hugh Ferguson
26th September 2009, 21:03
Yes, John Early, your father does feature in the book: he is mentioned in "Appendix A-Sources", and the photograph he gave to the author is there facing p.279, showing a group of six Able Seamen all named except one. Your father appears in the front of the "Special Painting Party". It is dated, March, 1945.
I have not been able to find any reference to the ship's mascot, thought to be (by Vonee), a twelve year old Chinese? boy.

We now need to know why Vonee has not returned to the thread he/she initiated.

Hugh Ferguson
30th September 2009, 18:38
Since the request by "vonee" on the 2nd Sept. I have been re-reading the book, In Time of War, written by Alex Aiken. The book is a truly remarkable account of the life of the ship that vonee's father sailed in, the Glenearn. I would go so far as to say that this description of the ship in which the author's father was killed is unique. I have a large collection of books about ships but there is nothing remotely similar to it-the detail, starting long before the keel is laid, is quite simply, phenomenal. Every page has the unusual feature of a date in the margins so that the reader is never in doubt of what period in the life of the ship you have arrived at.
Janet Aiken is the widow of the author and still has several brand new copies of the book which she is offering at a very modest price of 18 (not incl. of postage).

(I do hope that vonee will return to this thread and discover the existence of this book. He/she and any other is more than welcome to contact me by P.M. to obtain Janet's address).

Chris Albert
13th October 2009, 22:07
I do believe my grandfather ( Frank Calvert ) served on the Glenearn although I'm not quite sure of when and for how long. I have an idea he was serving aboard in 1945/46 as I have uploaded what I believe to be a couple of photos of his shipmates from that time to the gallery.
He sent them to my grandmother and she date stamped them March 1946 but this may just be when she got them.

Hugh, I would be very grateful if you could forward any contact info for a copy of the book as I would love to know more about the history of this ship and of perhaps my grandfather's life onboard.

Many Thanks

Chris Albert

John Earley
15th October 2009, 17:11
Greetings Nick I wonder whether your father could answer the query from Vonee(who started this thread) about the Asian Boy adopted as amascot on Glenearn during her time in Kure1945/46? I'm sure she would be delighted to receive any info. regards Teb

Hi Teb
sorry to miss your enquiry I think the email notification must have been off.
I'll ask my father tonight.

Last weekend I went to clear my Fathers house and found all sorts of interesting things that I have never seen before in 50+ years like his dog tag and bosun's whistle and discharge papers and unbelievably all his medals and bars (Thumb) plus some more pictures of the Glenearn and his first ship HMS Despatch

I'll post some pics when I get a chance.

John Earley
15th October 2009, 17:20
Regarding my earlier post - Len Nichols is apparently alive and well in a nursing home.

The landing craft that blocked the escape hatch from the mess and whose high octane fuel caused the explosion was an LCT not LCA as I originally stated.There were apparently three LCT's on the Glenearn but one was apparently pinched for other duties prior to the D-Day landings

I wanted to display some of the things I found in my Father's belongings last weekend.

Can anyone name all three objects?

Which is the odd medal out ?
http://i130.photobucket.com/albums/p261/peanutNboo/bosunspipe15-10-200902-03-112851x24.jpg
http://i130.photobucket.com/albums/p261/peanutNboo/medals08-10-200917-44-153492x1901.jpg

Peter4447
18th October 2009, 16:57
Hi John
Looking at the medals, the silver one on the far right is the 1914-18 War Medal and was issued named to the recipient (around the rim). The cased one is American and was awarded to members of the US Army for Good Conduct (3 years initially but, I believe, this was reduced to 1 year in 1943) and I assume that this is the odd one out.
Peter4447

John Earley
18th October 2009, 17:11
Hi John
Looking at the medals, the silver one on the far right is the 1914-18 War Medal and was issued named to the recipient (around the rim). The cased one is American and was awarded to members of the US Army for Good Conduct (3 years initially but, I believe, this was reduced to 1 year in 1943) and I assume that this is the odd one out.
Peter4447

actually I thought that the 14-18 medal was the odd one out as it was issued to my grandfather . I hadn't noticed that the good conduct medal was US Army !

Guess that must have belonged to my Father's second Wifes first husband .She passed away a few years ago

well spotted(Thumb)

John Earley
18th October 2009, 18:36
I do believe my grandfather ( Frank Calvert ) served on the Glenearn although I'm not quite sure of when and for how long. I have an idea he was serving aboard in 1945/46 as I have uploaded what I believe to be a couple of photos of his shipmates from that time to the gallery.
He sent them to my grandmother and she date stamped them March 1946 but this may just be when she got them.

Hugh, I would be very grateful if you could forward any contact info for a copy of the book as I would love to know more about the history of this ship and of perhaps my grandfather's life onboard.

Many Thanks

Chris Albert


Chris my Father is unable to tell you anything much about the Glenearn after December 1945. My Father remembers disembarking in Singapore with The Captain , various officers and others around that time .He believes he stayed in Singapore for a few weeks awaiting passage home.

You really need to obtain a copy of the excellent book about the Glenearn 'In time of War' by Alex Aiken it has a very detailed account of the ships entire service.

I would be very interested in seeing any photos that you may have .

Chris Albert
21st October 2009, 21:15
Hi John

I've uploaded the few photos I have ( all of crew ) in the gallery, If you search Glenearn they should hopefully show up. I quoted the writing on the reverse as perhaps the names may be of interest.

I have a copy of the book coming when all this postal strike business is finished. Looking forward to a good read.

Chris

John Earley
21st October 2009, 21:29
Thanks Chris i'll see if I can search out the photos. I'll upload my fathers when I get a chance.
good hunting
Nick

JOHN C TAYLOR
31st October 2009, 11:07
Hi all have just found this site quite by accident, so pleased Glenearn is mentioned. I am currently tracing my late fathers war history whilst on board
and I have read Aikin`s brilliant book, in fact my dads actually mentioned
Sub Liut John S Taylor, the book tells a tremendous story of the ship and
its crew based on the ships log and crew stories. we did not know dad was at the D Day landings only for this book. There are more pictures of the ship
being towed after colliding with GEORDIC on the australian war site, but if you
just put HMS GLENEARN in to google there is a wealth of information to start
your search, will watch this site always, thanks all.......John T

John Earley
31st October 2009, 11:57
Hi John
so sorry to hear that your Dad has pased away. My Father is now 88 this Christmas and I've only just found out last month about the D-Day involvement. My Dad's memory is not as good as it used to be but some of his stories are amazing. Apparently the Glenearne made three trips to Sword to drop troops and supplies off.
John remembers the big guns firing and the huge shells screaming over the Glenearn and landing one forward one aft with a huge whoosh ,explosion and emmense column of water that engulfed the ship.

The gunners had obviously found the range and all the men waited for the third shell that would hit the ship which fortunately never came.

I have managed to record three 15-20 minute video sessions with Dad without him being aware of the camera. I am hoping to record lots more if I can.

If you wanted me to ask John anything about the ship and life aboard etc please do not hesitate to ask. I know John is happy to talk about old times anytime.

I'm so concious there is little time left now and could kick myself for not spending more time with him when he was younger and had a better memory.

Wish I'd attempted to put him in touch with other members of the crew years ago.There was a Glenearn reunion some years ago and I have the invite sheet with lots of names and email addresses and phone numbers but have been reluctant to follow it up. I imagine most will have now passed on and now I wouldn't want to risk upsetting surviving family members .

In May this year in Taunton I met the final surviving member of the 1st parachute brigade who took the Arnheim bridge .In the next 5-10 years we will probably lose most if not all the remaining survivers of WWll .

This is our last chance to have 1st hand accounts .

Glad you found the forum(Thumb)

chrissiewalton
31st October 2009, 17:14
Hi,

My Grandad, Robert Arthur England, 'Bob', was on board the Glenearn as he was transporting from one place to another (unfortunately i don't know specific details!) with the landing crafts as he drove them in the war. Has anyone got any memories or information regarding him? He was a mischievious man who was always up to something! I think he spent a lot of time in the tool shop and ended up making a strange lighter (with a brass button design that he stuck on the front!) and selling them to the others on board!

I also know that he was in charge of the rum and cigarette ration for a while! He was a sergeant in the Marines. It would make me so happy if anyone out there had any information! He also had a young black boy as a mascot whom he nicknamed 'Tuesday!'.

Kind regards
Chrissie Walton

JOHN C TAYLOR
31st October 2009, 18:21
GOODNESS a reply within hours, John Early many thanks, firstly I send my best wishes to you and your dad, I too wish I had listened to my fathers stories more,but even as a child growing up in Liverpool dad always pointed out the ships and identified them as they arrived in port and also I remember following Glenearn in the shipping column in the Liverpool echo as it resumed
peacetime voyages in the fifties.
There is also on the australian war memorial site listed, video footage onboard
of a training exercise, but we can only access it if we are australian citizens
but I have contacted my sister in oz to see if she can see it, fingers crossed
might have our dads on it maybe.
best wishes..........John T.

chrissiewalton
10th November 2009, 17:13
Vonee, If it was the case that you were not successful in finding your way back to your "hello" thread on the Glenearn click HERE (http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/showthread.php?t=29054)

Could you scan the photo in? My Grandad may be on it! Chrissie

John Earley
10th November 2009, 18:28
There is also on the australian war memorial site listed, video footage onboard
of a training exercise, but we can only access it if we are australian citizens
but I have contacted my sister in oz to see if she can see it, fingers crossed
might have our dads on it maybe.
best wishes..........John T.

Hi John
any luck with the video ? it would be fantastic to show my Dad some video footage of the training exercises.

johnwilkins
10th November 2009, 20:27
How do I post a PM message, I cannot seem to see the link or icon

K urgess
10th November 2009, 21:10
How do I post a PM message, I cannot seem to see the link or icon

Click on the name of the person you want to send a PM to and pick PM from the list.
Cheers
Kris