Time at sea between ports and time out from UK?

rcraig
4th September 2009, 15:57
It had passed through my mind....not that much stops en route nowadays...that it might be of interest to record the length of time for some of the passages without striking land deliberately and the length of time out from the UK or elsewhere before returning to the base country.

The longest trip in time that I did was from Cristobal to Australia on the Glenbank. With often one engine broken down I think the total time taken was about 53 days. But I had heard of a trip taking 58 days across the Pacific.

My longest trip was just short of 25 months but that was exceeded by many of course.

The master and chief on the Springbank did over 3 years and 2 years 8 months, and I cannot remember if that was when I joined her in Australia before we got home 6 mths later, or their total time. I think it was the former. I think that both were relatively new to their posts and it seemed then that the company were simply just using that as a leverage. It seemed pretty harsh even for those days.

I do remember Capt. Holbrook with a couple of drinks in him at anchorage in the Fannings dancing on his own to the tune of Swedish Rhapsody.....a concept so difficult to imagine that it may have been me who had had the drinks....and advising me to leave the sea and his advice was based on his long time away from his family over the years

Alistair Macnab
4th September 2009, 16:16
Bank Line was known for 'long trips' in fact 'renowned' would be the better word. I remember my mother telling me that she had been at a meeting where there were other mothers of seafarers present and on being told that I was with Bank Line, a Clan Line mother said: "Oh! They do long trips don't they?" My mother not to be put down by anyone as insignificant as a Clan Line mother responded in defiant voice: " I'll have you know, they've just reduced the voyages from two years to fifteen months!"
Good for you, mother!
But its quite true that two year trips separated you from your family at home and from the community of your peers. I always marvelled at those who were married and made it work, Captain and Mrs. Peter Stewart, for example and brought up two fine children in the process. I don't think it would have worked for me so I didn't even think about getting married during the 15 years I was sailing.
I did five long voyages - 23 months; 25 months, 24 months, 27 months and 28 months and three copra voyages thrown in (plus or minus 6 months). There have been numerous references to the dreaded drafting to the White Ships! Believe it or not, Alan MacGregor and I were volunteers! And whilst I got relieved in 24 months, I seem to remember Alan was dragged out to something like 26 months!
My discharge book is barely on to Page 2!

ccurtis1
4th September 2009, 16:44
Kevin Habben, Australian 2/E joined the Irisbank in Belfast (newbuilding) in 1964 and left her in Falmouth in 1967. Well over three years

K urgess
4th September 2009, 16:58
A fifteen month double header on the Weirbank is my longest.
A friend was on the Lossie as sparkie for 18 months.
In those days when you joined you expected to be away for the full length of the articles at least.
Anything less was a bonus.
Longest port to port was Singapore to Liverpool on the Wierbank that took 39 days at around thirteen and a half knots.
And she never missed a beat.
Trouble was I couldn't sleep when I got home because it was too quiet. (Sad)

China hand
4th September 2009, 18:30
I believe that Captain John Betts and his Lady Wife actually sailed 7 (SEVEN) years on the Titanbank.
I did half a year with him on FIRBANK when Capt Bevis died, then two years with him on TESTBANK (maiden voyage).
We wondered had Lady Wife driven him mad, or had he driven Lady Wife to the bottle (1030, two wicker chairs, one table, bottle of Gordons, glasses, Mrs Betts.( Call me Linda, Love).
His words to me when I went for 2nd Mates - "don't let me down, son". This after years of thinking *@%XX:: the way he pushed me.
In memory I love them both deeply.

China hand
4th September 2009, 19:22
59 days, Bahia Blanca to Shanghai via the Cape. Old bulkie "Fortitude" (or Yum Chee). Grain. Was good, still remember the sigh she gave when we anchored.(==D)

Johnnietwocoats
4th September 2009, 23:11
12 Months, 14 Months and finally 18 Months. That was my 4 year Apprenticeship.
Bank Line didn't give a Fiddlers how long you were away from home.
As an Apprentice and in my Prime I had no girlfriend worries, except where to find the next one.
Don't understand how engaged or married men went away for two years or more. Saw the result of lots of "Dear John" letters....Drink and more drink.
One would have to figure that a few of the wifes left at home had a bit'o'tail on the side.......Nature says it happened......
Of couse a lot of the "Married" guys I sailed with had their fair share.
Hopefully nobody is going to come on here and tell me that you were all Saints and that your "Old Ladies" were the same....LOL

TC....(Smoke)

jimthehat
5th September 2009, 12:21
21 months as 3/0 on the Isipingo
2years 3 days as 2/0 on the Ettrickbank ,flew out to singapore,flew home from calcutta.
JIM

VTR1000
5th September 2009, 12:29
The OCL/P&O box boats used to do Port Chalmers in NZ to Zeebruge in around 29 days ............. way to long for a shoot up the road person like me, Good ships, nice shipmates but way too long at sea for me in one go without touching land.

To you guys who did longer, I take my hat off .... if I was wearing one that is.

David E
5th September 2009, 23:52
2 Years 11months-Three ships:two months leave:11 months-three ships completed my Apprenticeship in Bank line

Joe C
9th September 2009, 17:14
This is probably a "mini-marathon"by Bank Line standards.I left Bromborough on the Irisbank in December 1955 and returned to Bromborough (believe it or not)in March 1958. The Irisbank trip ended in Cape Town when I transfered to the Levernbank in May 57, then the Fleetbank in November '57 for a month, followed by a month in a grotty hotel in Colombo then the Ivybank home. By then I had completed my apprenticeship and received my indentures but since I had, in the meantime failed the B.O.T. eyesight test I was told I could sit the second mates cert and have it marked "Failed Eyesight"This didn't really appeal to me and put paid to my sea going career.

Steve Woodward
9th September 2009, 17:25
26 months - just having way too much fun to think about going on leave

trevor page
9th September 2009, 17:31
I did four months on PSNCs George Peacock but it felt like 12 months.

terence
19th September 2009, 00:15
trever, had a stand by on that one 61 or 62
terry music man

johnb42
19th September 2009, 06:19
I did 22 months on the Marabank as Mate, but had my wife with me for the last ten, so I didn't consider it too big a deal.

paisleymerchant
19th September 2009, 07:08
Longest trip was 7 months
Longest time between ports was 42 days

Burned Toast
19th September 2009, 10:17
26 months - just having way too much fun to think about going on leave

How many days Steve was it between Durban and Conception Chile?.(Smoke)

ianian
19th September 2009, 15:35
The longest run I did non stop was Bombay to Boston on the Nairnbank in 1967, and we ran out of beer after the first week, the mate had plenty of booze though, Geo Smith could get spirits any time he wanted but the rest of us plebs couldn't, the old man , the mate , the C/eng and the 2nd eng could but the 3rd eng ,4th eng 2nd mate and third mate, electricians and junior engineers had to go dry, what a plonka that old man was, the mate put it up to him, and he went along with it, still a long time ago but I still despise the ratbag

Ianian

Charlie Stitt
19th September 2009, 18:39
In the 1970's,Two hours between Larne and Cairnryan, on ASN Ferries, had to do two round trips a day for a whole four days before getting only eight days off,it really was mustard, my Wife threatened to leave me.

jimthehat
19th September 2009, 22:46
Charlie,.
slightly out of thread here,but on the LSts from preston to larne we would sometimes take 5 days to get to Larne,drop the preston pilot at the bar belt down to molfrey bay for shelter then dash across to the isle of man for more shelter,then up to the scottish coast and a final leg across to larne.
On the felixstowe/Zeebrugge service it was 1.5 trips daily and 4 days and four days off,that was really hell.

jim

lagerstedt
20th September 2009, 00:24
What officer ranks in the Bank line could take their wives with them and for how long? It would appear some of the other shipping Companies would allow all officer ranks to take wives after a qualifing period.

Regards
Blair
NZ

johnb42
20th September 2009, 09:21
What officer ranks in the Bank line could take their wives with them and for how long? It would appear some of the other shipping Companies would allow all officer ranks to take wives after a qualifing period.

Regards
Blair
NZ

As far as I remember, prior to c.1971, only the Master and chief Engineer were allowed to have their wife accompany them. From 1971 or thereabouts, this was extended to Mate and presumably 2nd Engineer. The Company also allowed children of pre-school age to travel. I don't remember any time limitation placed on the arrangement, but obviously once the children went to school it was over. When I left the Bankline these were still the only officers allowed to have their wife aboard, but I imagine this may have changed as other companies allowed more wives to travel.
John

simomatra
28th September 2009, 20:47
The longest run I did non stop was Bombay to Boston on the Nairnbank in 1967, and we ran out of beer after the first week, the mate had plenty of booze though, Geo Smith could get spirits any time he wanted but the rest of us plebs couldn't, the old man , the mate , the C/eng and the 2nd eng could but the 3rd eng ,4th eng 2nd mate and third mate, electricians and junior engineers had to go dry, what a plonka that old man was, the mate put it up to him, and he went along with it, still a long time ago but I still despise the ratbag

Ianian
Yes Ian sadly I was there and agree entirely.

Remember in Boston when all us enginering staff go logged?

Good to talk to you again after all this time.

Richie2012
28th September 2009, 21:27
Longest time for me without touching land is 5 weeks it was crap!

Billieboy
29th September 2009, 06:58
Mena al ahmadi - Geelong - Khor-al-amiah - Geelong - Mena, first stay in Geelong seventeen hours, second stay was three days 26, 27, and sail 28 December 1964, what a Christmas party! at anchor and ashore!

Mike Lindsell
12th October 2009, 10:28
2 x 2 year + trips , one in the old S.S. Hazelbank ( Ex Empire Franklin - completed my apprenticeship), and later M.V. Teakbank (completed my 9 years with Bank Line, then migrated to Australia.

Mike Lindsell

Mike Lindsell
12th October 2009, 10:32
Longest time between ports - Balboa (Panama Canal ) to Auckland NZ 39 days on the M.V. Clydebank (1925 vintage. ).

Mike Lindsell.

greektoon
12th October 2009, 11:13
Longest single voyage: 44 days from Dampier to Port Talbot

Charlie Stitt
11th December 2009, 18:12
Remember how we looked forward to claiming a refund in income tax for being out of the UK for a complete tax year. We on the Inverbank stood by her completion for around one month, signed articles on 26th March 62 and sailed the next day for Bremen to load coke, then Hamburg for general. Fron the 26th March the trip lasted for 20 months and we did not get one penny tax refund, WHY, because ,from Hamburg, we called into London, arriving 5th April and sailing on the 7th April 62. Never got ashore in London, so that brief visit of less than two days, cost us dearly. Who can I complain to please ?(MAD)

Johnnietwocoats
12th December 2009, 05:01
Remember how we looked forward to claiming a refund in income tax for being out of the UK for a complete tax year. We on the Inverbank stood by her completion for around one month, signed articles on 26th March 62 and sailed the next day for Bremen to load coke, then Hamburg for general. Fron the 26th March the trip lasted for 20 months and we did not get one penny tax refund, WHY, because ,from Hamburg, we called into London, arriving 5th April and sailing on the 7th April 62. Never got ashore in London, so that brief visit of less than two days, cost us dearly. Who can I complain to please ?(MAD)

Me.....(Smoke) (Smoke)

Rudolph.A.Furtado
12th December 2009, 05:57
The longest "Non-Stop Sailing" of my career has been on a bulk carrier "Mineral Europe" of "Anglo-Eastern" from Holland to Brazil in 1988, over a month of steaming.

ccurtis1
12th December 2009, 12:01
Merchant Pride.
Bahia Blanca to Shanghai. An eternity with six weeks anchorage at Shanghai

Alan Rawlinson
26th December 2009, 16:46
The OCL/P&O box boats used to do Port Chalmers in NZ to Zeebruge in around 29 days ............. way to long for a shoot up the road person like me, Good ships, nice shipmates but way too long at sea for me in one go without touching land.

To you guys who did longer, I take my hat off .... if I was wearing one that is.

A month at sea is a long time, but compare this to previous generations who had much longer and hazardous voyages.

From my library '' The Last Survivors in Sail '' - the Olivebank was renowned for being overdue but always turning up safely. She did 166 days from Port Lincoln to Queenstown in Ireland in 1927, and an earlier passage of 147 days from Australia to Falmouth in 1925. Approx 5 months per passage!

RayL
29th December 2009, 19:57
As a Marconi sparks, when I learned that I was about to be sent to join Speybank, somebody explained to me that Bank Line was renowned for squeezing the maximum service period out of you by sticking to the Articles, but after 24 months you were entitled (he said) to insist on being flown home from the next port if this was practicable.

Thus it was a sad occasion when I took my leave of my family at Lime Street Station and headed for London, for we all believed that we were parting for two whole years.

When my mother died, my brother requested that I be flown home from Penang, but the hard reply was that if I did this I would have to pay for not only my flight but that of my replacement!

Oddly, the voyage turned out to be an unbelievably short one - only five months!

boatlarnie
2nd January 2010, 10:20
Longest time at sea for me was on the Oakbank when we took 55 days to get from Tauranga (NZ) to Albany(OZ); course we went via Nauru Island so spent 34 days drifting off the damn place with not a beer in sight. Old Man was Charlie Howe and he never carried a bond. 2 Aussies travelled from nauru to Albany with us, spent the whole passage drinking huge amounts of beer, never shared themn with us though.
Boatlarnie

ALLAN WILD
2nd January 2010, 20:35
Longest time at sea for me was on the Oakbank when we took 55 days to get from Tauranga (NZ) to Albany(OZ); course we went via Nauru Island so spent 34 days drifting off the damn place with not a beer in sight. Old Man was Charlie Howe and he never carried a bond. 2 Aussies travelled from nauru to Albany with us, spent the whole passage drinking huge amounts of beer, never shared themn with us though.
Boatlarnie
Longest trip was on a Shell tank mt:Pallium, a tar boat, 17 months. My longest time at sea was from Aruba to Alicante in Spain, 1 week slow steam Aruba to Newhaven, 4 weeks at anchor Newhaven, slow steam to Spain 3 weeks. Sent back to the States slow steaming 3 weeks, spent 3 weeks at anchor befor discharging in Perth Amboy...14 weeks all told. But we did bunker and store up by barge in Alicante.....

gorach
3rd January 2010, 23:31
Longest sail between ports 52 days a sea berth Algeria to Anacortes USA . Longest trip 6 Months nothing to some of the old timers who had been there well over a year this was in 1982. Nowadays working DSV,s North Sea longest without a port call 6 weeks.

Alistair Macnab
6th January 2010, 05:06
Loading bulk wheat at Bunbury in Western Australia and topping off in Fremantle were pleasant interludes before the comparatively short trip to Madras (for lightening) then Calcutta. All went well and we were proud of the cargo deadweight lifted which was a bit of a record for the ship and her class. Madras came and went and again we were at the requisite even keel and draft to get into Kidderpore Dock in Calcutta. Upon arrival at Sandheads, however, we found ourselves in a veritable flotilla of waiting ships and upon anchoring, we were told that we should wait for our turn.

Waiting and waiting..

One month, two months.... no drinking water as we had kept our intake of FW to 50 tonnes to maximize our cargo uplift!

Thank heavens for air conditioning otherwise I'm sure we were all pretty ripe as time went on. Our two passengers were fit to be tied. Had they known about the delay, they would have disembarked at Madras!

Anyway, after 65 days the Calcutta office eventually negotiated our diversion back to Madras for fresh water but when we arrived there, lo and behold! it seemed as if every other waiting ship had been given the same instructions. Off Madras and it was anchor again and wait. After 15 days we were allowed into port to replenish water, discharge our passengers, but again sent immediately back out to the anchorage, where after a week, we were instructed to sail again for Sandheads.

Surprisingly, we embarked a Hooghly Pilot on arrival and discovered that our combined waiting at Sandheads and Madras had counted towards our laytime for obtaining a berth. As an 'arrived ship' we were becoming very expensive! We ascended the river and slipped into Kidderpore, no less than 99 days after leaving Fremantle!

How did we cope with no drinking water? Easy. The Swan Lager never gave out!

rcraig
6th January 2010, 12:37
I never had the misfortune to be at anchor so long and my recollection of lying at anchor off Beira does not extend to the length of time we spent there. It seemed to hold the world record with 3 months not being uncommon.

In the old days (well, the '50s anyway) we would have dehydrated on the Eastbank as I do not remember a bond running.

Klaatu83
6th January 2010, 13:06
The longest voyage I ever made was on a ship christened, appropriately enough, the S.S. Rover. We sailed from North Carolina in mid September 1990 with a load of ammunition for Ad Dammam, via Suez, under charter to the Military Sealift Command Atlantic (The U.S. equivalent of the British RFA.). It took three weeks to get there, and we then spent another six weeks on the hook before finally going in to the dock. We spent another month discharging our cargo, principally due to mix-ups and misunderstandings amongst the military. During all that time nobody was allowed ashore.

From thence we sailed to Diego Garcia, that fly-speck in the midst of the Indian Ocean that represents the last bastion of the British Empire. We paused en route only briefly, at Fujairah, to bunker offshore from a tanker called, believe it or not, the "Titanic"! However, one day out of Diego we were "Shanghaied" by MSC Far East, who curtly informed us that we had entered their baileywick, so from now on we belonged to them and henceforth would go wherever they ordered us to go. Consequently, from Diego Garcia we proceeded by way of the Sunda Straits to South Korea, Okinawa and the Philippines, loading more ammunition which, by way of Singapore, we discharged in Jeddah and Ad Dammam. After about six and a half months tramping all over the world we finally paid off - on the island of Guam.

Noddy-Billing
6th January 2010, 13:15
Certainly not a record but I sailed from Plymouth (UK) on September 26th 1967 (My 25th Birthday) and arrived in Singapore on December 24th (Christmas Eve) 1967, (88 days?). In that time we had 6hours in Freetown (Sierra Leone) for bunkers, 12 hours in Cape Town for stores and 20 hours in Mombasa for stores and bunkers. The remainder of the time was spent on the Armilla Patrol off Mozambique or at anchor (but no shore leave) / on patrol off Aden during the British withdrawal of Forces from that troubled place. The ship was RFA Resurgent. I doubt that this kind of thing was uncommon for RFA's in those days.

JimC
6th January 2010, 17:19
January to December,1961. Naess Sovereign. Was ashore for exactly 2 hours during the entire time. Ship was running between the Persian Gulf and the Bataan Peninsula. Sand one end - jungle the other. No docks or jetties. Dolphins and a wee hut one end and a monster called a Hartley Hose Hoister at the other. Stopped in Singapore Roads once evry three months for stores.

rcraig
6th January 2010, 18:16
Jim C ...Reminds me of an old song from the Caribbean............Call this living?.. no my son.....

Winebuff
13th January 2010, 16:48
Longest trip 7 months
Longest time without going ashore about 16 weeks. Japan to gulf with tyres for Iraq (Iraq/Iran war), discharge at anchor after being held outside for weeks, then down to Durban. Nearly drank the town dry that night.
Longest stay 8 weeks in East London dry dock having a new bottom fitted to the Fleetbank before she was sold. We were there so long we appeared in the local paper as an attraction, somewhere to take the kids at the weekend.

Peter Smith

Abbeywood.
18th January 2010, 05:46
I was in the 'Marabank' from 21 Jan' 1964 until 13 May 1966, (a total of 845 days, although I did mange to cram in a leave period between 2/3 and 7/4/65, purely as the ship was on the UK coast for that period.
Finally left the ship in Calcutta on 13/5/66. though, to be honest, if I'd been asked/told to stay on I probably would have without too much fuss.

My longest single passage was in the 'Abbeywood', (ex-Houlder Brothers 'Rppingham Grange') en route to the breakers yard in Japan. Part of the voyage was from Callao to Manila over a period of fifty-eight days, non stop.
Twin screw ship running on one engine.

kwg
18th January 2010, 11:37
Was on the NZ phosphate run for a year, round trip should have been 3 weeks out 2 weeks in, Nauru to Napier and Mt. Manganui mainly. I didn't keep records like some of you guys but remember drifting off Nauru for weeks on end sometimes, drift for 10 days or so and slow steam back to island...booorrrriiinnnggg...the charts had never been so up-to-date.

The Apps and Sparks never had it so good in port, all had a job on the quay offloading, filling road lorries from the hoppers mainly, cash in hand at the end of every shift.

Once we were in Napier with the R.Y. Britannia, she was berthed directly opposit, for some reason we had to stop unloading whilst she was there.

Dalby
17th August 2012, 17:05
It had passed through my mind....not that much stops en route nowadays...that it might be of interest to record the length of time for some of the passages without striking land deliberately and the length of time out from the UK or elsewhere before returning to the base country.

The longest trip in time that I did was from Cristobal to Australia on the Glenbank. With often one engine broken down I think the total time taken was about 53 days. But I had heard of a trip taking 58 days across the Pacific.

My longest trip was just short of 25 months but that was exceeded by many of course.

The master and chief on the Springbank did over 3 years and 2 years 8 months, and I cannot remember if that was when I joined her in Australia before we got home 6 mths later, or their total time. I think it was the former. I think that both were relatively new to their posts and it seemed then that the company were simply just using that as a leverage. It seemed pretty harsh even for those days.

I do remember Capt. Holbrook with a couple of drinks in him at anchorage in the Fannings dancing on his own to the tune of Swedish Rhapsody.....a concept so difficult to imagine that it may have been me who had had the drinks....and advising me to leave the sea and his advice was based on his long time away from his family over the years
My first trip as a junior apprentice with Bank Line was on the Glenbank in 1955, Captain Carver was also doing his maiden voyage as skipper. Our Pacific crossing from Balbao to Aukland took 29days and as with R. Craigs' journey much of the time we had one of the engines down.
One night in the middle of the pacific there was a fire in the engine room and I slept through the whole incident fire alarm and all. You can imagine the ribbing I got the next day.

Alistair Macnab
17th August 2012, 17:32
I am astounded to see so many Bank Line stories on this site! It must be true then, that Bank Line were infamouse for long trips! Reminds me of the time my Mother was in the company of other seafarer mothers and a snobby lady said: "My son in Clan Line says that Bank Line are known for long trips!" My Mother, pulling heself up to her full five feet height retorted "Well, your son is wrong. They've just reduced the trips to 15 months!"

aleccrichton1982
17th August 2012, 18:19
left the tyne on 11 july 68 on british guardsman paid off in glasgow 15 sept 68 didnt get ashore once

Julian Calvin
17th August 2012, 18:51
Was in Bahia Blanca, Argentina on BF bulker, "Hector" as 2nd Mate.
Destination was Yokohama. Old Man asked me to lay two courses, one around each Cape using both rhumb line and great circle routes. (could have killed him) Difference between both was 25 miles.
Eventually went across via Cape of Good Hope. Slow steaming at 9 knots due to Gulf crisis. 35 days at sea.
From Yokohama to Vancouver then another long one to Santos, Brazil around the Horn 36 days then further two weeks at anchor making repairs.

China hand
17th August 2012, 18:59
See post No.6

Waighty
17th August 2012, 20:27
Some of us actively looked forward to long trips and were then cruelly denied! Marabank 1971 joined in Philadelphia on 17th February, lightship to Domincan Republic, sugar to Marseille, lightship to US Gulf, to Aussie, then sugar to Liverpool. Not what we wanted at all, we were hoping for a tax year but as I said above, cruelly denied!

Waighty
17th August 2012, 20:29
Some of us actively looked forward to long trips and were then cruelly denied! Marabank 1971 joined in Philadelphia on 17th February, lightship to Domincan Republic, sugar to Marseille, lightship to US Gulf, to Aussie, then sugar to Liverpool. Not what we wanted at all, we were hoping for a tax year but as I said above, cruelly denied!

Longest anchorage - Shatt Al Arab on Shirrabank 1978, the anchor cable doubled in diameter due to marine growth, spent ages getting it off to stow cable! Must have been four weeks or more.

Split
17th August 2012, 20:49
The longest I did was 22 months in Counties. Caltex used to to fly us to and from after a year and we got 105 days leave.

However, I packed it in when I got married, 50 years ago!

John Dryden
17th August 2012, 21:27
Some of us actively looked forward to long trips and were then cruelly denied! Marabank 1971 joined in Philadelphia on 17th February, lightship to Domincan Republic, sugar to Marseille, lightship to US Gulf, to Aussie, then sugar to Liverpool. Not what we wanted at all, we were hoping for a tax year but as I said above, cruelly denied!

Longest anchorage - Shatt Al Arab on Shirrabank 1978, the anchor cable doubled in diameter due to marine growth, spent ages getting it off to stow cable! Must have been four weeks or more.

I can imagine that being a squidgy kind of job Waighty!The dry docks in those days must have been busy scraping the bottom.

lakercapt
17th August 2012, 22:15
First trip was in a Ropner ship and like Bank line they did long trips.
2 years 1 month 26 days.
Final load was from Port Pirie to Avonmouth 72 days with stops at Fremantle,Durban,Las Palmas for bunkers (Coal)

bill thompson
17th August 2012, 22:23
I joined Smith's "New Westminster City" in Sydney and paid off her in Newcastle NSW just over three years later.The last three years of my time,never had a day off articles.Were the best three years of my life.

Tonypep
18th August 2012, 00:04
On the "Londoner" 1971 it took us 56 days from New Orleans to Port Swettenham.
Run out of beer for the crew after 2 weeks and the Old Man posted no shore leave in Swettenham as we only expected to be there for 24 hours. (MAD)
Needless to say there was only probably him aboard that night (Pint)

Split
18th August 2012, 08:20
I joined Smith's "New Westminster City" in Sydney and paid off her in Newcastle NSW just over three years later.The last three years of my time,never had a day off articles.Were the best three years of my life.

Good for getting sea time in! I was out of school and ready for 2nd mates' exams three months before the legal age of 20 and had to wait.

I had my Master's Certificate when I was 25. I should have gone for Extra Master--a big career mistake.

Alan Rawlinson
18th August 2012, 12:13
Good for getting sea time in! I was out of school and ready for 2nd mates' exams three months before the legal age of 20 and had to wait.

I had my Master's Certificate when I was 25. I should have gone for Extra Master--a big career mistake.

Also had a master's ticket at 25, but not regrettful about going for extra master. There were ( and still are) so many more interesting avenues for advancement and a fulfilling career. In our day, studying for extras was a financial challenge as much as anything else, and the job openings very restricted.

It is so interesting looking back in deep retirement. - How many of us had skills and/or talents laying dormant? Personally, I would like to have made it as a professional golfer or maybe a portrait artist!

Best not to have any regrets - our sea going careers were priceless starters.

China hand
18th August 2012, 18:55
I think a lot of us got our master's at 25, and more than a few of us were tempted. I was offered a "sort of" seamanship teaching post if I was willing to go for extra. I had no wish to come ashore and turned it down.
Many years later I turned down the offer of a superintendents job in Bank line, and was !!!d in Bury Street (We cannot fail to be amazed at your persistent refusal to further your and our interests by taking this opportunity). Told 'em I wanted to stay at sea. Nuff said, redundant a couple of years later.(Night)

guinnessmick
18th August 2012, 19:11
longest time i was without setting foot ashore was53 days BA to yokohama and we docked the day before president kennedy got shot

Split
18th August 2012, 23:46
Also had a master's ticket at 25, but not regrettful about going for extra master. There were ( and still are) so many more interesting avenues for advancement and a fulfilling career. In our day, studying for extras was a financial challenge as much as anything else, and the job openings very restricted.

It is so interesting looking back in deep retirement. - How many of us had skills and/or talents laying dormant? Personally, I would like to have made it as a professional golfer or maybe a portrait artist!

Best not to have any regrets - our sea going careers were priceless starters.

You make me feel better about that. In any case, I have no regrets, especially with my wife, 3 kids and 2 grandkids.

pete
19th August 2012, 12:21
Longest Voyage was London to Port Moresby during the Suez Crisis, about 44 Days I think, unless you include 100 odd days drifting off Nauru waiting to load a full cargo of Bird Sh*t for Aussie. Longest trip 22 months on the Dartbank 1967/69.......pete

ernhelenbarrett
20th August 2012, 08:40
Tweedbank 39 days Panama to Brisbane, but longest was drifting 15 days off
Christmas Island then off to Nauru, drifted 10 days then Ocean Island drifted 5 Days then back to Christmas Island for another 9 days when finally managed to get under the cantilever to load phosphate for Geraldton, Albany Esperance and Geelong, that was on BPC,s Trienza/GJJZ then back up to Christmas Island for another drift. We used to unload the passengers into a cage to be hoisted up the Cliff and during school we had about 13 schoolkids on board, all wanting to get into the Radio Room which was the only place they could play their records
(that was in the days of 75 and 45 rpm records!!!) Had to turf them out when I came off watch at midnight!!
Ern Barrett

Waighty
21st August 2012, 19:49
I can imagine that being a squidgy kind of job Waighty!The dry docks in those days must have been busy scraping the bottom.

The stench wasn't too pleasant either!