Near loss of HMS Endurance

MWD
5th September 2009, 19:35
Thoughts anyone on what went wrong to cause the engine room flooding and near loss of HMS Endurance?

I sailed in the 50,' & 60's and we frequently had to clear ships side suction strum boxes, which I have believe was what they were doing.

According to a documentry on TV the other evening, the flooding was at the rate of 1200 tonnes in half an hour. Ships side valve failure seems to be what they are suggesting as the cause!

Look forward to reading comments.

MWD.

Billieboy
6th September 2009, 06:35
2400 tons per hour is a bit more than an 8inch pipe at full bore on a 1.5Bar head, or draught of about 45 feet Endurance didn't go down that far, as I remember. Thinking back to sea box weed clearing gear, this was usually through a 1 or 2" screwlift steam injection valve.

MWD
6th September 2009, 11:52
Need more details - have you got a link?

TV documentary on National Geographic Channel Friday 4 Sept.

I then Googled HMS Endurance and followed up various options. The outcome being that apparently nearly a year has passed and no enquiry yet held. RN and politicians being very carful over what they are saying and using National Security as an excuse.

Something like neg*****ce springs to mind!

MWD.

chadburn
7th September 2009, 16:49
2400 tons per hour is a bit more than an 8inch pipe at full bore on a 1.5Bar head, or draught of about 45 feet Endurance didn't go down that far, as I remember. Thinking back to sea box weed clearing gear, this was usually through a 1 or 2" screwlift steam injection valve.

Known as Blowjacks in my time at sea

MWD
7th September 2009, 19:56
Many thanks,

This would be an explaination for their problem. I had no knowledge of such arrangements. However, should there not have be "proceedures" to follow?

Thanks for your thoughts. I guess we have to wait for the outcome of the enquiry.

Reminds me of a chief who claimed to have saved his ship in the south China Sea when a ships side main condenser supply line downstream of the ships side valve fractured. Ships side valve siezed and the massive inflow threatened the diesel generators crancases. Whilst they attempted to make and fit a very large spade they had to skinny dip to remove an engine room double bottom cover (happily empty) to allow the water to drain.

Ah! happy days.

Regards,

MWD.

Billieboy
7th September 2009, 20:12
If it was a ship side Butterfly valve, flanged and classed, then the equilibrium point would be 2 degrees open. However, as SM states above, the dynamic torque could be out of the range of the actuator; the valve would however close 88 degrees. Thus. it wasn't a butterfly valve, or if it was, then nobody tried to close it.