Old Anchor - any info please ?

Huck Finn
17th October 2009, 08:45
I have uploaded a photo of an old anchor that the yacht club that i am a member off has been donated.
I am trying to find out any information at all on its, age, maker, type, anything at all.
The club plans are to clean it up, paint it and turn it into a memorial for old members that have passed away and also to members that fell in the great wars.
The boat club its self has a bit off history attached to it, Our clubhouse is the officers smoke room cut from the Ben Line's S.S. Bencleuch when she was broken at P & W MacLellan Ltd at Grangepans in 1972. This ship breakers is where the anchor came from, it had been buried some time in the past and was not discovered until 2008 when ground works for a new sea defense system were put in place. Unfortunately their are no records on what ship it came from and the ship breakers closed many years ago.
More history on the club and club house can be seen at
www.ufbc.co.uk
http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/201674

Billieboy
17th October 2009, 09:42
Looks like an old iron stock anchor that has lost it's stock. Also, because of it's "Tripping shackle"(at the fluke end), it could be an old, (19th century), Naval annchor.

Thats another Story
17th October 2009, 10:11
the fluke end looks to be able to swivell?

GALTRA
17th October 2009, 10:47
Just Google TROTMAN ANCHOR and you will find further info on this type of anchor, Charley

Huck Finn
17th October 2009, 11:31
The fluke end does swivel John, Thanks for that Galtra, you have hit the nail on the head.

Huck Finn
17th October 2009, 16:30
Trotman Anchor being delivered to the Upper Forth Boat Club

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D4OYQxfu-MM

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cgyP4xC0Nok

Nick Balls
17th October 2009, 17:35
Just been looking in some old Admiralty manuals as it looks to me to be either ex Naval or possibly something like Trinity House. The Old Admiralty anchors do have "Type" Numbers ..........So far I have not found it however !!!

Nick Balls
17th October 2009, 17:39
OK Galtra ....see what you mean !!! LOL anyway here is the story.
The Admiralty pattern anchor is the most recognisable as a typical anchor of a sailing ship. Developed in 1841 under the guidance of Admiral Sir William Parker it had a wooded shock, later to be wrought iron and with curved arms. The Admiralty pattern anchor with its superb construction it represents the final stage in the development of the fixed are anchor. However the 19th century great steps were also being taken in new anchor design. The long shank anchor of the 17th century and the admiralty pattern anchor of the 19th century both had issues when it came to recovering them from the seabed which required the use of a rope from a davit off the side of the ship. In 1832 Lieutenant William Rodger patented his small palm anchor which remained in use until the 20th century, and in the late 19th century anchor designers like Porter, Honiball and Trotman all developed anchors with differing fluke shapes and even with swivelling crowns

The end of the 19th century saw the patenting of the new type of anchor – the stockless anchor. The type that remains in use on board sailing ships to this day.

benjidog
17th October 2009, 23:38
Welcome from Lancashire - I hope you enjoy the site.

Huck Finn
18th October 2009, 15:10
Thanks Brian

Billieboy
18th October 2009, 15:38
When it comes to holding power, a "Flipper Delta", (Invented by Mr. Haak in The Netherlands around 1978/82), will wipe the ground with any previous or later models. 100:1 is usually the minimum holding power with half a shackle of cable, three ground shots will and does, hold anything the North Sea or Mexican Gulf can throw into the holding equation. The tripping and recovery, of these anchors is fairly easy with the pennant wire being quite light, compared to the mooring wire, as will be attested by any anchor handling boat skipper.

riverdiver
23rd July 2010, 01:28
This is a trotman anchor we found and brought up last month. It is 10' tall and 11' wide at the cross arm and weighs 3166 lbs. Had it sand blasted, primed, painted and is now for sale.

NZSCOTTY
23rd July 2010, 03:46
I have uploaded a photo of an old anchor that the yacht club that i am a member off has been donated.
I am trying to find out any information at all on its, age, maker, type, anything at all.
The club plans are to clean it up, paint it and turn it into a memorial for old members that have passed away and also to members that fell in the great wars.
The boat club its self has a bit off history attached to it, Our clubhouse is the officers smoke room cut from the Ben Line's S.S. Bencleuch when she was broken at P & W MacLellan Ltd at Grangepans in 1972. This ship breakers is where the anchor came from, it had been buried some time in the past and was not discovered until 2008 when ground works for a new sea defense system were put in place. Unfortunately their are no records on what ship it came from and the ship breakers closed many years ago.
More history on the club and club house can be seen at
www.ufbc.co.uk
http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/201674

Huck - have you any photos of your club house. Would be interested as I was a cadet on Bencleuch in 1963 and may have been allowed into the officers' smoke room on the odd occasion!!