Salt Junk

Binnacle
22nd October 2009, 11:46
I see that Marks & Spencer have started selling "Dry Cured Salt Beef Joint", this is about the closest I've come across to the salt junk we used to get at sea. May appeal to older members nostagic for past memories. My only gripe with it is it is not salty enough. I suppose the health people would complain if it was otherwise.

ROBERT HENDERSON
22nd October 2009, 14:38
I cannot remember if I ever had salt junk on ships, but I certainly remember early on in my career while serving on sailing barges having it.


Regards Robert

ALAN TYLER
22nd October 2009, 15:52
In my time in the galley it was called Brisket of Beef, maybe that looked better on the menu, it was still Salt Beef and had to be soaked in water or well washed off at least before cooking.

benjidog
22nd October 2009, 20:19
Funny you should say that. I was in a M&S food store at lunchtime and they were going on about reducing the salt in all their products. I guess they will have a problem reducing the salt content of salt beef - it will become salt-free beef.

lakercapt
22nd October 2009, 20:42
Its always been on sale in the big grocery chains here.
Sells in 1 gallon pails as "Naval Beef" and is a favourite with our Newfoundland citizens who serve it up in "Jiggs Dinner"
Boiled vegetables, eg Carrots, cabbage, turnip, potato and salt beef all in the same pot. One cupful of split peas is also added
The beef is drained and soaked overnight in fresh water

Billieboy
22nd October 2009, 20:45
Brisket of beef! the most God awful meal ever served on a ship! next to dried salt cod that is!

degsy
23rd October 2009, 00:00
I have just ordered a lump of Brisket of Beef from our local butcher, now if you cook it right on a low heat it is one of the tastiest cuts of beef(Thumb)

John Rogers
23rd October 2009, 00:39
My son cooks it in beer when he makes BBQ out of it,pulls it all off the bones before serving,very good.

John.

degsy
23rd October 2009, 05:11
My son cooks it in beer when he makes BBQ out of it,pulls it all off the bones before serving,very good.

John.

What beer John, that sounds bloody lovely(Applause)

AncientBrit
23rd October 2009, 05:16
That would be American beer, similar to strong water in UK or Canada(Jester)

billyboy
23rd October 2009, 06:08
Brisket rolled and roasted very slowly is delicious. the sweetest meat on the beast. Get some nice dripping off it too!

Burned Toast
23rd October 2009, 15:43
Brisket of beef! the most God awful meal ever served on a ship! next to dried salt cod that is!

Beef Brisket Cooked with Plenty of Veg and stock for a few hours yum yum.

Corned Pork Leg similar

Salt Cod if soaked to remove the salt it tastes yum yum when fried in beer batter(Thumb) and Chips and Mushy peas:sweat:

Ray

Billieboy
23rd October 2009, 18:45
I hope I'm not getting mixed up BT, I was thinking of that red and white, salted beef; not too thinly sliced, with that dark brown oxtail tasting gravy poured over it! I'm definately off the salt cod, sailed with a Liverpool captain once who liked to eat it every day, bloody bonkers he was!

Burned Toast
23rd October 2009, 22:05
I hope I'm not getting mixed up BT, I was thinking of that red and white, salted beef; not too thinly sliced, with that dark brown oxtail tasting gravy poured over it! I'm definately off the salt cod, sailed with a Liverpool captain once who liked to eat it every day, bloody bonkers he was!

I think we have a different recipe I think you mean the brisket that's been soaked in brine with loads of saltpetre, usually soaked for about a week in brine then wash the brine of and simmer in stock. when sliced the meat does have a reddish colour while the fats off white.[=P] yum yum.

Ray

ROBERT HENDERSON
23rd October 2009, 22:12
We often have brisket pot roasted in onion gravy, My wife and I find it the tastiest flavoured beef there is. Or shin of beef with suet dumplings for a casserole, my belly's rumbling typing this.

Regards Robert

Klaatu83
24th October 2009, 14:13
lakercapt
Retired Ancient Mariner

Join Date: Jul 2005
My location
Posts: 1,164
Its always been on sale in the big grocery chains here.
Sells in 1 gallon pails as "Naval Beef" and is a favourite with our Newfoundland citizens who serve it up in "Jiggs Dinner"
Boiled vegetables, eg Carrots, cabbage, turnip, potato and salt beef all in the same pot. One cupful of split peas is also added
The beef is drained and soaked overnight in fresh water


Newfoundland was also the only place I've ever been where the grocers actually sell "Hard Tack". They soak it for twenty-four hours (it really is HARD!), boil it with salt cod and then serve it up as what they call "Fish and Brewis", which is purported to be the national dish of Newfoundland. It's also the only place I ever was in a restaurant that served fried codfish cheeks and tongues, which are a great Newfie favorite. They also regard seal flippers as a delicacy.

lakercapt
24th October 2009, 14:18
Newfoundland was also the only place I've ever been where the grocers actually sell "Hard Tack". They soak it for twenty-four hours (it really is HARD!), boil it with salt cod and then serve it up as what they call "Fish and Brewis", which is purported to be the national dish of Newfoundland. It's also the only place where I ever was ever in a restaurant that served fried codfish cheeks and tongues, which are a great Newfie favorite. They also regard seal flippers as a delicacy.

Sailed with a "Newfie" crew as the only outsider and got severed these "delicacies" on a a regular basis and never got to liking them. The Figgie duff that was served with the salt fish and brewis was OK

DMA
25th October 2009, 19:01
Guess what I found in the fridge.One of the hazzards of marrying an East Coaster!! (Thumb)

Prudence
5th March 2010, 05:58
Try making a white sauce with mustard and horse radish o go over the beef and vegetables. Standard fare at our place especially in winter. Prudence

Billieboy
5th March 2010, 06:55
I think we have a different recipe I think you mean the brisket that's been soaked in brine with loads of saltpetre, usually soaked for about a week in brine then wash the brine of and simmer in stock. when sliced the meat does have a reddish colour while the fats off white.[=P] yum yum.

Ray

Yes Ray, that's the stuff could never get to enjoy it even when were ran out of food one trip.

All the sodium nitrate in the Newfie photos, could probably turn it into explosive if needed.

tsell
5th March 2010, 09:03
Used to eat a lot of it in NZ with Puha. Loved it!

Taff

Cisco
5th March 2010, 09:43
I had a spanish bloke in the crew a few years back. He went ashore in Ushuaia and brought back some bacalao. Imported all the way from Spain with a price to match.... so you soak it for a few weeks with frequent changes of fresh water to get rid of the salt.. then he cooked it up and served it with mash.... very nice but not a whole lot different to a tin of jurel mixed through some mash...which takes 10 minutes start to finish.... maybe my taste buds are stuffed....

That said I reckon corned beef or brisket is good tucker....

Cisco
5th March 2010, 09:50
"The flensed, dried and crucified fillet looks anything but appetising. Old-vest off-white in colour and coated with a rough salty dandruff, its texture is of balsa wood and its aroma faintly urinal."

pinched that from here... http://www.streetdirectory.com/travel_guide/9643/travel_and_leisure/how_salt_cod_conquered_the_world.html

Prudence
9th March 2010, 10:25
Dear Billy Boy things aint what they used to be. Here we have to register our fertilizer and keep it locked up...now you are suggesting a YALE LOCK OR TWO ON THE FRIDGE..truly the security guys would eat all the evidence and i'd have to fall back on toast and sardines for dinner....and you don't get my Grandmother's secret receipe for that one.(Cloud)

stevie burgess
11th March 2010, 02:19
Salt beef,salt pork and salt fish....was brought up on it and it's great!! Pickled brisket is good too which i get from the local butcher.
Not a very healthy diet nowadays but hey they had no fridges years ago so everything had to be salted to preserve meat and some of them lived to a ripe old age!!

TonyAllen
11th March 2010, 16:59
We have brisket of beef 3 out of 4 sundays slow pot roasted until tender then stand on a slicing board to cool.When cold it slices nice and thin to make the best sandwhiches with a full grain mustard and a cold beer mmmmm Regards Tony

Naytikos
17th March 2010, 03:53
'Salt Beef and Beans' is one of the classic dishes throughout the English-speaking Caribbean.
As stated by Lakercapt it comes in one-gallon (US gallon) pails either with or without bones. Rinsed a couple of times and then simmered with hot peppers and black beans, it is usually eaten with rice cooked in coconut milk.
Hard to choose between salt beef & beans, curried goat, or oxtail for a real treat!

John Tremelling
29th March 2010, 21:01
I have had salt beef on passenger ships (not these grotesque looking pack as many onboard as you can cruise ships), quaintly entitled 'Boiled Beef and Carrots'. Make it sound like something the 'poor people of the East End' eat and the toffs lap it up.

Hugh Grant
30th March 2010, 18:19
I remember in 1951 on board the Ivybank the chief engineer an irish man took the fridge engin to bits and could not get it to start again. WE had to salt the meat into milk churns by adding salt to water and to get the right salt content we added salt till the potatoe floated on the top of the water the the cuts of meat were added to the churns. The likes of liver ,kidneys and sausages were dumped over the side, until some of the crew took it off us and cooked there and then . The older crew had a great time with the salt meat but the younger one didnt think it was all that marvelous, The frige engine was repaired in Auckland and the fridges restocked. I never found out what Capt Freddy Hale said to the chief

Pat Kennedy
30th March 2010, 20:19
Was this boiled beef and carrots the same as I saw often in Blue Funnel ships, which was beef with the carrot already inserted into the meat somehow? It certainly wasnt normal type beef, it was roughly circular and was 50% fat/gristle, and was usually discarded into the gash bucket.
Pat(Smoke)

John Tremelling
30th March 2010, 20:47
It was not as you describe Pat, sliced beef, boiled or mashed potatoes and carrots. I always enjoyed it, but then, apprentices will generally eat (and drink) anything.

john fraser
30th March 2010, 20:55
Was this boiled beef and carrots the same as I saw often in Blue Funnel ships, which was beef with the carrot already inserted into the meat somehow? It certainly wasnt normal type beef, it was roughly circular and was 50% fat/gristle, and was usually discarded into the gash bucket.
Pat(Smoke)

Beef a la mode was the beef with the carrot inserted.Usually the cheapest joints of beef were used.Apple pie a la mode never had a carrot but had ice cream.

Andrew Craig-Bennett
6th April 2010, 12:04
"Jimmy's Kitchen" in Hong Kong is an institution, because it has never changed its menu from the 1930's (and it seemed to me to employ every single steward and cook who went ashore from CNCo ;)) and it does a very good "Corned Beef and Cabbage" which is of course salt beef.

But I suspect that salt beef as served in a restaurant is veryy different from the stuff that came out of the harness cask in the days of square rig when, according to Basil Lubbock, you were advised "not to pass to leeward of the harness cask"!

Binnacle
6th April 2010, 12:28
Guess what I found in the fridge.One of the hazzards of marrying an East Coaster!! (Thumb)

I've never tasted that variety, I think I would like to know the origins of the navel. (Whaaa)

R396040
6th April 2010, 20:06
When I think of salt beef it automatically brings back memories of the Jewish snack bar just across from the famous Windmill theatre in Londons Soho in the fifties. Working by ships in the Royal Docks and in the evening going "west" to experience a slightly different feel to the pubs of Woolwich or West or East Ham and after a few pints a really mindblowing salt beef sandwich from above mentioned snack bar where you sometimes met up with the showgirls from the Windmill but sadly only to stop & stare. Other ladies were more available if you had a big enough sub. Happy days. In comparison to those sandwiches think Montreal offered the best ones.
Stuart

lakercapt
7th April 2010, 13:59
I've never tasted that variety, I think I would like to know the origins of the navel. (Whaaa)

Was naval beef not belly button stuff we got with the "Newfie" crew

the brit
7th April 2010, 15:47
When I think of salt beef it automatically brings back memories of the Jewish snack bar just across from the famous Windmill theatre in Londons Soho in the fifties. Working by ships in the Royal Docks and in the evening going "west" to experience a slightly different feel to the pubs of Woolwich or West or East Ham and after a few pints a really mindblowing salt beef sandwich from above mentioned snack bar where you sometimes met up with the showgirls from the Windmill but sadly only to stop & stare. Other ladies were more available if you had a big enough sub. Happy days. In comparison to those sandwiches think Montreal offered the best ones.
Stuart

yes still going strong here in montreal schwartz's probably the best known and longest serving still on the main(saint laurent boulevard)
http://www.schwartzsdeli.com/index_eng.html maybe this will bring back memorys.

R396040
8th April 2010, 09:41
yes still going strong here in montreal schwartz's probably the best known and longest serving still on the main(saint laurent boulevard)
http://www.schwartzsdeli.com/index_eng.html maybe this will bring back memorys.

Yep that brings back memories too. besides the salt beef which were Good......
Down St Laurent and St Catherines usually after the first beer in Joe Beefs on the waterfront when I was sailing on Cunard cargo boats 50s/60s/ Great
Stuartmemries of Canada

Binnacle
8th April 2010, 11:37
Was naval beef not belly button stuff we got with the "Newfie" crew
Bill,
I suspected, wrongly, the manufacturer had used a French term and this was indeed French junk, however navel does not appear in a googled French dictionary.

EBenarty
20th May 2010, 21:30
In Shetland and Orkney they make what is called Reasted Mutton which is mutton salted then dried It does not look appetising but tastes delicious !!

ALAN TYLER
25th May 2010, 21:56
In Shetland and Orkney they make what is called Reasted Mutton which is mutton salted then dried It does not look appetising but tastes delicious !!

I,ll take your word for that on the taste, maybe it needs a sprig of parsley to add to its looks!!!

alan ward
14th October 2011, 16:15
Brisket of beef! the most God awful meal ever served on a ship! next to dried salt cod that is!

I say steady on old chap,what about salt leg of pork,corned ox tongue?They always had that petrol on water,rainbow gleam on the sauces.Probably the saltpetre.

alan ward
14th October 2011, 16:21
I hope I'm not getting mixed up BT, I was thinking of that red and white, salted beef; not too thinly sliced, with that dark brown oxtail tasting gravy poured over it! I'm definately off the salt cod, sailed with a Liverpool captain once who liked to eat it every day, bloody bonkers he was!

I used to drink in a pub called the White Horse in Woolton village Liverpool one of my regular companions was a fishermonger who owned Charles`once a famous name.He told me that they used to sell bales and bales of salt or stock cod/fish on a saturday as it was a traditional Liverpool sunday breakfast.

TonyAllen
15th October 2011, 00:12
Alan being from Kensington we always had salt fish every sunday morning like most of the people on the kensington fields estate,bought off the man with the cart also had spare ribs sat night.Having 5 brothers we all had to chip in for the ribs ma would not buy them she said that was extra Tony

stevie burgess
15th October 2011, 02:12
Corned leg of pork is lovely. My local butcher has never even heard of it...although he's a very good butcher. I only wish i could get some now. Mind you i enjoyed some salt herring yesterday...followed by a few beers!!...great.

alan ward
16th October 2011, 12:05
Alan being from Kensington we always had salt fish every sunday morning like most of the people on the kensington fields estate,bought off the man with the cart also had spare ribs sat night.Having 5 brothers we all had to chip in for the ribs ma would not buy them she said that was extra Tony

Ribs and cabbage,I had a girlfriend whose grandparents lived off Walton Road,George and Helen Hurley first time I ever tasted ribs I was expecting pork BBQ and didn`t like the look of bacon ribs when I first saw them the first taste had me as a convert

By the way have you seen Kensington lately?our grandaughter has just started university in Preston and we drove home through Liverpool to see if there were any liners down at the pierhead.I got lost on my way out.Lost in Liverpool!

TonyAllen
16th October 2011, 12:39
[By the way have you seen Kensington lately?our grandaughter has just started university in Preston and we drove home through Liverpool to see if there were any liners down at the pierhead.I got lost on my way out.Lost in Liverpool![/QUOTE]

This comes under the term improvement ? did go thru a while back to show my grandson our old house and like you with so many one way streets I was lost trying to get out of the estate Tony

PS nice to see so many posts from you lately have, you now retired and ready to enjoy to yourself !!!!!!!

alan ward
17th October 2011, 12:23
Retired Tony?I never started work,the reason I have time to swap yarns is that the missus has taken charge of the business.

As well as the pub I have always done a bit of antique dealing as well sadly the field I dealt in,georgian furniture, is now so in the doldrums that is there is little point in continuing so I have stopped.This leaves me with time on my hands.So until I find something else to do I have the opportunity to read these forums and they are so very entertaining.

I used to read one called Scousehouse,there were two very funny and informative contributors there both ex-masters,one from Liverpool and the other from Blackburn or somewhere up there.They had sailed tother as ABs and had done well the Liverpudlian had emigrated to Australia and he was a interesting informed man.his stories rang true and I enjoyed them.Sadly the site became clogged with the usual suspects,it all started with stories about bars in Valparaiso circa 1959 with federales being thrown through bar windows and deteriorated into postings about sweet shops in Tuebrook.Tony started an alternative site called The Seamans Hospital but it disappeared as there weren`t enough of us to keep the yarns going sad but there you go.

Mick Spear
1st July 2012, 11:43
Alan,
I enjoy reading your posts mate. Please keep them coming. Further to your Ribs thread above. I rememeber when I was Pantry boy on Geest boats, we had sides of bacon that had to be boned. When a side was done, the Old man and Chief would be the recipients of the ribs. My job was to go down the Galley and pick them up. They would be wrapped up in Foil, sometimes they would be taken straight out of the Pea and Ham soup and other occasions just boiled or oven baked. I would usually sneak a Rib or two before passing on to the Tiger who would take them up to the Old Man and Chief. The ones taken straight from the Pea and Ham soup were delicious.
Mick S

alan ward
1st July 2012, 12:24
A few years ago I had a pub down the road from where we are now.I was in the butchers and noticed he was selling ham hocks cheap so i bought a couple locked myself in the galley,cooked the hocks and used the second boiling water to make some pea and ham soup.A real thick green soup with lumps of the freshly cooked ham in it.We served it with croutons fried in butter and when I got the waiting on staff to try it before serving they didn`t like it.Never seen it before,didn`t like the meat in it,too thick,too this,too that.I put it on the menu and sold one!Peasants.

TonyAllen
1st July 2012, 14:56
thats the trouble with the youth of today they have no taste,i suppose thats becouse there is such a lot of ready to go food that they cannot wait for food to be prepared my son and his missus have gone to asda to get the sunday dinner all ready cooked,haveing worked in the Galley for 5 years it drives me mad.I told them next week I do all the cooking. Regards

Rooney1.
2nd July 2012, 13:51
How about curried pig tails ?.

alan ward
2nd July 2012, 16:10
My beautiful daughter,like her mother blonde and blue eyed,can`t cook to save her life.She buys her food from M&S prepacked and cooked her daughters,not surprisingly come here to eat regularly the young one always asks for a chicken dinner.they both have good taste and it comes from eating here with us.How can a woman as intelligent as her cook so lazily it costs more,you get less and it looks bad.

TonyAllen
3rd July 2012, 00:18
My beautiful daughter,like her mother blonde and blue eyed,can`t cook to save her life.She buys her food from M&S prepacked and cooked her daughters,not surprisingly come here to eat regularly the young one always asks for a chicken dinner.they both have good taste and it comes from eating here with us.How can a woman as intelligent as her cook so lazily it costs more,you get less and it looks bad.

The other thing Alan that drives me mad is they buy the fruit in plastic cartons eat a bit of it then say its not sweet enought so I took the black grapes off her and put it on the window sill facing the sun and said wait 2 days then eat them,the shock on her face when she did was worth the wait,and they throw so much food away becouse of the sell by date yet its still perfectly good to eat.I think I have my hands full just to get them to mend their lazy ways .
like you my grand son always came here on the weekends and loved his nanna's cooking espesh sundays followed by Pudding Regards Tony

spongebob
3rd July 2012, 05:04
Salt junk or the like had passed its used by date by the time I went to sea but on joining the little banana boat MV Navua I was intrigued to see a beautifully crafted wooden barrel lashed down in the tiller flat. It was oval in shape, tapering from bottom to top with a volume of about fifty gallons. A question as to its purpose prompted Sparky to search ship builder Henry Robb’s original inventory list to find that it was supplied as a salt meat barrel. Perhaps this is proof that at the ship build date of 1955 it was still a requirement that some British ships victualed with salt junk.
A little time later the subject of home brewed beer came up and in next to no time a brew of someone’s best was laid down in this ideal brewing vessel. A voyage to the Pacific Islands and back to Auckland during winter the widely varying temperatures spelled disaster for the brewing process and after a couple more attempts the commercially brewed product won back the day.


The barrel came to an ignominious end when it finished up in the engine room parked under the Colchester lathe headstock and filled with dirty overalls. The lathe revolving at low speed driving a reciprocating plunger furnished with a big flap of insertion rubber got garments squeaky clean especially when aided by a couple of cakes of Union Co toilet soap.
A Cooper would be a rare tradesman today.

Bob

alan ward
6th July 2012, 14:42
Tell you what Spongebob that barrel is worth about 80 if stamped and authenticated and even more somewhere like the east coast of the states.We used to get a Boston buyer over here and that homespun stuff was always his thing.

alan ward
6th July 2012, 14:44
Tony,same thing with avocadoes,they buy `em and then can`t eat `em.Does anyone grow the seeds in glasses anymore?

chadburn
6th July 2012, 15:45
thats the trouble with the youth of today they have no taste,i suppose thats becouse there is such a lot of ready to go food that they cannot wait for food to be prepared my son and his missus have gone to asda to get the sunday dinner all ready cooked,haveing worked in the Galley for 5 years it drives me mad.I told them next week I do all the cooking. Regards

The Cook on the last deep sea vessel I was Chief on the "Irenes Rhapsody" use to serve up "meljanis", it was superb and worth the wait.

alan ward
6th July 2012, 16:14
The Cook on the last deep sea vessel I was Chief on the "Irenes Rhapsody" use to serve up "meljanis", it was superb and worth the wait.


What was that?

chadburn
6th July 2012, 19:59
It is a Greek recipe, the Irenes was Greek owned. Cut aubergines in half, stuff with mince and onion's and bake in the oven.

TonyAllen
7th July 2012, 00:15
It is a Greek recipe, the Irenes was Greek owned. Cut aubergines in half, stuff with mince and onion's and bake in the oven.

My late wife made a great stuffed aubergine,was tought to make it by a sargents wife in athens who was a greek lady and became a favorite meal of ours Regards tony

Ducado
9th September 2012, 17:37
It's American Corned Beef and very good it is too!

Farmer John
9th September 2012, 18:19
My Daughter's bloke is Jamaican and has some great recipes for all sorts of food, often very spicy. I really wanted to try Saltfish and Ackee, when it was served I found that the Saltfish just triggered a gag reflex, so that didn't get a fair trial.

I love brisket and corned beef, the brisket wants a good long cooking. Oxtail is great too, I think the bones and the tough bits cook down to give that dark gravy... Got to stop, drool is shorting my keyboard.

makko
10th September 2012, 04:09
Oxtail is great too, I think the bones and the tough bits cook down to give that dark gravy... Got to stop, drool is shorting my keyboard.
John,
We use a "slow pot" method in the oven, ususally lamb neck:

Fry till browned neck sections previously coated with flour. Remove and put to one side.
In the same pan, put two finely chopped garlic and one finely sliced onion. fry till transparent. Add 1-2 glasses of red wine. Salt and pepper. Simmer until bubbling.
Put all ingredients in earthenware oven pot with lid. Coarsely chop carrot and add.
Cook in oven at 180C for 1-2 hours.
Enjoy! (Great gravy and melt in your mouth meat!)
Rgds.
Dave

Farmer John
10th September 2012, 18:24
John,
We use a "slow pot" method in the oven, ususally lamb neck:

Fry till browned neck sections previously coated with flour. Remove and put to one side.
In the same pan, put two finely chopped garlic and one finely sliced onion. fry till transparent. Add 1-2 glasses of red wine. Salt and pepper. Simmer until bubbling.
Put all ingredients in earthenware oven pot with lid. Coarsely chop carrot and add.
Cook in oven at 180C for 1-2 hours.
Enjoy! (Great gravy and melt in your mouth meat!)
Rgds.
Dave

Well, that's it, I have invested in a waterproof keyboard. We got educated to cooking and eating everything when we had our own lambs in the orchard of the house that went with the farming job.

Fred Field
30th March 2013, 09:27
lakercapt
Retired Ancient Mariner

Join Date: Jul 2005
My location
Posts: 1,164
Its always been on sale in the big grocery chains here.
Sells in 1 gallon pails as "Naval Beef" and is a favourite with our Newfoundland citizens who serve it up in "Jiggs Dinner"
Boiled vegetables, eg Carrots, cabbage, turnip, potato and salt beef all in the same pot. One cupful of split peas is also added
The beef is drained and soaked overnight in fresh water


Newfoundland was also the only place I've ever been where the grocers actually sell "Hard Tack". They soak it for twenty-four hours (it really is HARD!), boil it with salt cod and then serve it up as what they call "Fish and Brewis", which is purported to be the national dish of Newfoundland. It's also the only place I ever was in a restaurant that served fried codfish cheeks and tongues, which are a great Newfie favorite. They also regard seal flippers as a delicacy.

I am not sure but I believe the 'Naval' part is because it was used by the Royal Navy when Newfoundland, as a British Colony, was 'ruled' by Royal Navy admirals, known locally as 'Fishing Admirals'

As for the 'Jiggs Dinner' what you describe is the 'traditional' one but what a lot of Newfies do is serve a roast of some kind with it.
I have never seen the split peas added straight to the pot, always done in a 'pease pudding bag', which are sold in stores, or you can make your own.
Something else my wife's family, and many others, do is serve it with spotted dick, on the same plate. The first time I saw that served was by my future mother-in-law (we did not know that bit at the time) and I made some comment about about 'spotted dick' with the main course, the women were horrified. I have since been forgiven and introduced them to horseradish sauce with beef, which is generally well liked.

Hard Tack the Newfies generally refer to that as 'hard bread' and it is made by a local company and sold across Canada, mainly in Newfie speciality stores in centres where there sufficient Newfies to support such an enterprise.

Flipper pie, if correctly cooked, is delicious, it is one Newfie dish dearly beloved has not mastered, ma-in-law used to make a good job of it.

ben27
31st March 2013, 03:27
good day binnacle,sm.22,october.2009,19:46 re:salt beef.just been reading the salt beef thread.there are certainly different ways of cooking it.i found it all very amusing.i showed the wife some of the ways you all cook your beef,she said she was having corned beef tonight,and it woul;d be cooked as usual.i might add the corned beef here is the best we ever had,enjoy your week end,ben27

Samsette
2nd April 2013, 04:23
Corned beef, carrots, cabbage and onions was called New England Boiled Dinner on one Bluey I sailed on, in the late forties.

It used to be the fifty cent daily special at the cafe across from the Bay Street, TO bus depot in the mid-fifties. The cheapest meal in town.

kauvaka
2nd April 2013, 07:15
Had salt beef (known as silverside in NZ) today with kumara, carrots and bok choy plus onion sauce. Very nice too.

alan ward
3rd April 2013, 13:11
We put brisket on the menu here and it sells well

trotterdotpom
3rd April 2013, 13:31
Flipper Pie! Imagine the distress of a seal, wakening from its clubbing, only to find that it can't type!

John T

Fred Field
3rd April 2013, 13:34
We put brisket on the menu here and it sells well

My opinion, for what it is worth, is that if it is cooked 'correctly' it is delicious.
Additionally it used to be the cheapest cut from a side of beef, so not only did it taste good but was also very economical.
During dearly beloved's first visit to the UK, to among other things, meet future in-laws Mum cooked it and served it, enjoyed by one and all. We tried it during our camping trip through Europe the same year and the future Missus got sick. We have not had it since.

Fred Field
3rd April 2013, 13:37
Flipper Pie! Imagine the distress of a seal, wakening from its clubbing, only to find that it can't type!

John T

Love it!
Only thing is if it is properly 'clubbed' it does not wake up, unlike Jolly Jack who usually does.

TonyAllen
4th April 2013, 00:28
We put brisket on the menu here and it sells well

yeerss, trying to get my son to put it on the menu in his tavern for sunday lunch but meeting resistance from the young "CHEF "if you are ever down ormskirk way let me know i'll treat you to a meal,same for anyone else down this way cheers

Samsette
4th April 2013, 03:19
Brisket? Is that also known as flank whatever? We have a couple of butcher shops that sometimes put out London Broil, a rolled up piece of flank with stuffing, tied with string and cut into sections. I said sometimes, because the beef carcase has only a small amount of this cut on it.

Crispy and tasty, depending on what the butcher has stuffed it with.

Fred Field
4th April 2013, 04:32
Brisket? Is that also known as flank whatever? We have a couple of butcher shops that sometimes put out London Broil, a rolled up piece of flank with stuffing, tied with string and cut into sections. I said sometimes, because the beef carcase has only a small amount of this cut on it.

Crispy and tasty, depending on what the butcher has stuffed it with.

One word answer, No.
The diagrams at
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Cuts_of_beef
should give a better idea.

Samsette
4th April 2013, 05:59
Thanks for that, Fred. However, the wiki diagram shows flank at that part of the bovine body where I'd expected it to be. I got the info from the butcher in The Red Barn Farmers Market, on West Saanich Road. Ever had it?

Fred Field
4th April 2013, 10:43
Thanks for that, Fred. However, the wiki diagram shows flank at that part of the bovine body where I'd expected it to be. I got the info from the butcher in The Red Barn Farmers Market, on West Saanich Road. Ever had it?

Not prepared in the manner you describe.
As you said in an earlier post there is not much meat on it and the inner membrane has to (should) be removed before consumption. Most of the time ours used to end up in the sausage meat.
Brisket has a large heavy bone in it and I have never seen it cooked with the bone in.
What we used to call 'breast of lamb' included both the 'brisket' and the 'flank' with the bones and membrane removed. Now I have only ever had that stuffed and rolled as you describe.

alan ward
4th April 2013, 11:40
We cooked it at a low heat for four hours,remove from cooking liquor which is then thickened to make the sauce and serve it with creamed mash and sliced glazed c arrots.I once ate if three lunches in a row.