King Edward VII Nautical College London

Tom Wood
1st November 2009, 02:12
Any Cadets who were at K.E.V11 around early 50's please contact Tom via a PM in the first instance

non descript
1st November 2009, 07:35
The Site Owner’s request is that email addresses are not published – the web is a funny place and we can see the logic in seeking to avoid publishing email addresses – so we opt instead for PM, and have edited your posting accordingly.

Joe C
5th November 2009, 14:28
Any Cadets who were at K.E.V11 around early 50's please contact Tom via a PM in the first instance

Tom,regards,I was at KE VII 1953 to 1954

compass1
28th November 2009, 03:51
At KE VII for summer term 1955

Tom Wood
8th December 2009, 22:47
Tom,regards,I was at KE VII 1953 to 1954

Hi Joe,
Thanks for your response - I was there one year before in 1952 and hoped some of my classmates were still around and kicking.
I've many cherished memories of the schooling and boating and training.

Was Capt. Chase still the principle during your time? Ballard, Miller and Fifield (can't remember the others) Gulliver was the caretaker at Cromwell Road.

S.Y.Wendorian (good pic. to download if you Google the name) and the launch M.V. Magellan and whalers the Lecky and Somner.
Bring back any memories???

Reminiscing, it was the best tough schooling any boy could ask for and taught me many a good lesson in life's troubled times.

Tom Wood
8th December 2009, 23:05
At KE VII for summer term 1955

Hi Member Compass1
I was at King Edward 1952 for the years course and hopes others in my class would be around to chat with. You apparently came a year later.
However, I appreciate your response and its good to hear from another cadet.
Many years have gone by but thanks to the internet and to this website contact can now be made worldwide to any associates in ones lifetime.
If only we guys had this kind of mod use during our days we'd be made.
I've started to write about my days at the school and all the happenings which made quite an impression and a good tough training for life into society.
Am I right that the Norrie tables were out of tune and had to be revamped?
Wish I could remember the reasoning for turning in those expensive tables for new ones. Just a thought.
Regards Tom.

Joe C
9th December 2009, 22:02
Hi Joe,
Thanks for your response - I was there one year before in 1952 and hoped some of my classmates were still around and kicking.
I've many cherished memories of the schooling and boating and training.

Was Capt. Chase still the principle during your time? Ballard, Miller and Fifield (can't remember the others) Gulliver was the caretaker at Cromwell Road.

S.Y.Wendorian (good pic. to download if you Google the name) and the launch M.V. Magellan and whalers the Lecky and Somner.
Bring back any memories???

Reminiscing, it was the best tough schooling any boy could ask for and taught me many a good lesson in life's troubled times.

Learned many a lesson in my year there,the names you mention I can well remember but the only other instructor I can recall by name is Capt. Tulloch.We sailed one of the Whalers on the Thames one time with him in charge, almost gunwall under, one of those experiences you never forget.There was another instructor there with a Scandinavian sounding name, someone will remember for sure.The P E instructor left an impression though,every boxing session,I would probably remember his name if hadn't thumped me quite so frequently.Great respect for all the staff though maybe didn't express it at the time

Joe C
14th January 2010, 16:12
Hi Joe,
Thanks for your response - I was there one year before in 1952 and hoped some of my classmates were still around and kicking.
I've many cherished memories of the schooling and boating and training.

Was Capt. Chase still the principle during your time? Ballard, Miller and Fifield (can't remember the others) Gulliver was the caretaker at Cromwell Road.

S.Y.Wendorian (good pic. to download if you Google the name) and the launch M.V. Magellan and whalers the Lecky and Somner.
Bring back any memories???

Reminiscing, it was the best tough schooling any boy could ask for and taught me many a good lesson in life's troubled times.

Tom I found this photo of the Magellan at Cadogan Pier Chelsea,thought you may be interested.

John_F
14th January 2010, 19:48
Tom Wood & Joe C,
I remember being aboard the Magellan on a trip from Wapping Basin (where the Wendorian was berthed) to the Thames Embankment (HQS Wellington) with Captain Miller in command. This would be Autumn 1958. Going into Shadwell Basin Lock he volunteered the Magellan's services to a bargee by offering to tow a Thames barge into & out of the lock. This offer was gratefully accepted & Captain Miller then demonstrated the power that was available from the Magellan's engine. Unfortunately, once we had entered the lock, the bargee missed lassooing the bollard on the dock & whilst the Magellan had come to a halt, the barge kept coming........ We all prepared for a cold bath in the waters of Shadwell Basin. Thankfully, the barge was unladen & the Magellan withstood the onslaught though there was much creaking of her timbers whilst she was being sandwiched against the lock wall. It was quite a "brown trouser" moment.
We eventually made it to the Wellington where I had my first experience of climbing a free hanging pilot ladder, suspended from a boom on the Wellington's starboard side.
Many thanks for posting the photo of the Magellan.
Kind regards,
John.

Keltic Star
15th January 2010, 04:58
Tom I found this photo of the Magellan at Cadogan Pier Chelsea,thought you may be interested.

Joe: Thanks for the Magellan picture, brings back happy memories with Captain Miller instructing.

waiwera
15th January 2010, 09:52
I was a cadet there but not until 63/64 year so not a 50's qualifyer. Enjoyed the story about the motor launch. By my time the launch was called the "cabot" - but still moored on boat booms attached to HQS Wellington on the embankment.
Remember having "power boat instruction" on a bitterly cold Thames. One day we were doing Williamson Turns to recover a very cold a wet dummy body against the stop watch. However the winner was the cadet "acting as OOW" who simply order full astern and stop! We recovered the "body" within a minute - he gained points for initiative - although hardly training for a future super tanker master (although think this particular cadet went to BI).
We had whalers in Millwall Docks for rowing and sailing. Plus we also used Whalers at HMS Pembroke in the Medway for Weekend "Outward Bound" Adventures with night sailing around the Thames Estuary. Plus weeks of training onboard the "Glen Strathallen" ( lots of links pictures on SN).
Yes I would agree it was a great start for a life at sea and really helped you to have a "respect for the sea". These days with push button totally enclosed bridges - you have to wonder if the same holds true.
It would be great to hear from any other 60's students.

Nova Scotian
15th January 2010, 13:22
I was a cadet there but not until 63/64 year so not a 50's qualifyer. Enjoyed the story about the motor launch. By my time the launch was called the "cabot" - but still moored on boat booms attached to HQS Wellington on the embankment.
Remember having "power boat instruction" on a bitterly cold Thames. One day we were doing Williamson Turns to recover a very cold a wet dummy body against the stop watch. However the winner was the cadet "acting as OOW" who simply order full astern and stop! We recovered the "body" within a minute - he gained points for initiative - although hardly training for a future super tanker master (although think this particular cadet went to BI).
We had whalers in Millwall Docks for rowing and sailing. Plus we also used Whalers at HMS Pembroke in the Medway for Weekend "Outward Bound" Adventures with night sailing around the Thames Estuary. Plus weeks of training onboard the "Glen Strathallen" ( lots of links pictures on SN).
Yes I would agree it was a great start for a life at sea and really helped you to have a "respect for the sea". These days with push button totally enclosed bridges - you have to wonder if the same holds true.
It would be great to hear from any other 60's students.

Hi Waiwera:

I was at King Teds, on the four month course, during the time you were there. I left in March 1964. I believe the Senior Cadet was David DeBarr and he was assisted by John Bell. I was in marine education for 25 years and believe the program at the College was one of the best I have been involved in.

There is a picture of my class in one of my threads entitled "Where Are They Now".

Cheers.

Joe C
30th January 2010, 16:22
The class of 1953/1954,recognise anyone?

telfrank
31st October 2013, 00:33
Any Cadets who were at K.E.V11 around early 50's please contact Tom via a PM in the first instance

hi tom/I went to K E V11 in 1953 but afraid I don't a lot of memories getting old I guess

janmike
31st October 2013, 15:59
Hi Tom I had the luck to attend KE VII Sept to Dec 1954. The short term involved a march to St.Pauls for a commemoration then a march to the MN memorial at Tower Hill. To crown it all Take the train to Lowestoft to join the Wendorian in drydock. Learn how to suji then crew her back to her berth in the London Dock. Great experience, stood me in good sted for British Tankers until December 1962
janmike.