Dunnage Wood

kwg
2nd November 2009, 12:09
Wish I had a for all what must be 10 x 1000's of tons of 'dunnage wood' B/L Apps tossed overboard.

K urgess
2nd November 2009, 12:33
Wonders worked by the Chinese chippy building ship's bars out of dunnage.
And all those wooden boxes to protect precious personal radios, etc.
Many a pleasant hour spent whittling a bit of dunnage to pass the time away on long treks across the Pacific.

johnb42
2nd November 2009, 12:37
Some twenty five years or more ago, the Avonmouth dockers were allowed to take dunnage from timber cargoes home. These were the days when solid fuel central heating systems, wood-burning stoves and open fire places were still common. Unfortunately, some dockers were not content to leave it at this and would deliberately break a bundle and mix the cargo with the dunnage. In the evening they would simply retrieve the good timber from the dunnage stack and take it home.
The abuse came to the notice of HRMC and the practice of taking dunnage from the docks was stopped. From then onwards, it was dumped on a bit of waste ground and burned.

Chris Isaac
2nd November 2009, 13:03
And what you couldn't get for a bar of soap and a piece of dunnage in Brazil!
As for 200 Chesterfield.... anything was possible!

Pat McCardle
2nd November 2009, 13:26
Happy days scrubbing clean the permanent dunnage in the lockers on 'Somerset'. Did I use the word happy there?(EEK)

McMorine
2nd November 2009, 15:09
Just the bar of soap in Saigon in the early sixties, would get a very nice girl. Didn't need the dunnage.

Derek Roger
2nd November 2009, 15:22
The officers of one the Brocklebank ships at anchor off Colombo for several months built a small sail boat from dunnage . It sailed quite well I was told .

NoMoss
2nd November 2009, 16:04
I sailed with one old man whos renowned for being 'careful' with money. When he was mate he would through dunnage over the side passing Robin Hoods Bay for his brother to collect on shore.
I won't mention his name but I could relate many tales of his ways of saving money.

Alistair Macnab
2nd November 2009, 16:05
All that dunnage wood tossed overboard to clear the decks! Oil-stained, bitumen-encrusted, didn't matter over the rail it went. Long before the regulations made such disposal unlawful!
Seriously, though, after discharge of cargo, the decks are stacked with dunnage, cordwood, mats and damaged separation cloths and nets. What to do? I don't know of many ports where they had facilities to take ashore more than a token amount of discarded trash. Also remembering that dunnage now has to be certified clean of infestation! Plywood sheets best bet!
Remember the good old days when each bundle of discarded dunnage was worth ten pounds round the Islands. Those were the days!

jimthehat
2nd November 2009, 18:21
in addition to all that dunnage there was all the ash/clinker on the coal burning etivebank that had to be shovelled over the side.

jim

Joe C
7th November 2009, 17:04
I never recall the word "dunnage "without remembering the man who went over the side from next to me when dumping dunnage after discharging tar oil in New Zealand and wondering how so many of us have survived into relatively old age.The health and safety rules that we laugh at in this day and age certainly did'nt exist when I was at sea in the 50s.I can remember dangling over the side,painting the draught marks in New york when my apprentice "friends" on the Moraybank let go the bowsing rope at smokoe and lowered me into the icy Hudson,no doubt getting their own back on a previous prank.My paint pot and brushes floated away at great speed and if I hadn't kept a grip of the bosuns chair,so would I! Chipping over the side anchored off Beira on the Fleetbank with the tide ripping past, and trying to stay clear of chippys box of tricks when working in the holds.Wasn't it amazing how skillful they were at carpenter things but completely useless at tying knots! We,ll put it all down to "experience"!

E.Martin
7th November 2009, 17:37
Was on Isaac Carter we carried only rolls of News Print to the UK from Canada,Newfoundland,Sweden,Finland,after discharging at Salford the dunnage was not allowed to be used again so we threw it on to the locks on our way down the Manchester Ship Canal,after discharging in London we would throw it overboard in the Thames Estuary.

Johnnietwocoats
7th November 2009, 19:10
Was on Isaac Carter we carried only rolls of News Print to the UK from Canada,Newfoundland,Sweden,Finland,after discharging at Salford the dunnage was not allowed to be used again so we threw it on to the locks on our way down the Manchester Ship Canal,after discharging in London we would throw it overboard in the Thames Estuary.

Remember on the Fleetbank when a pile of stacked dunnage in the #1 hold save the life of the middle Apprentice when he fell into the hold from deck level. He landed squarely on his back and the dunnage softened the blow.

TC(Smoke) (Smoke)

Ron Stringer
8th November 2009, 00:16
Chipping over the side anchored off Beira on the Fleetbank with the tide ripping past... !

During long spells at anchor off Beira we used to watch the sharks seeming to struggle to make headway against the current. They could hardly make 2 or 3 knots. While watching one day over the rail above the starboard quarter, we could see a 10/12 ft shark, barely moving through the water against the strong ebb. Then someone threw a load of galley waste over the side amidships and the shark took off like a rocket, hitting the garbage before it had sunk more that a couple of feet. It was such a display of explosive energy that we all recoiled from the rail that we were leaning on, as if we feared that it could reach us.

I assure you that everyone was very careful about boarding boats or working over the side after that.

billyboy
8th November 2009, 00:52
A Truck driver left behind a length of 4x4 dunnage at a warehouse one day. I noticed it was a heavy piece. Took it home and ran a planer over it. beautiful piece of NZ Kaori. It turned well on my lathe

Billieboy
8th November 2009, 05:14
A Truck driver left behind a length of 4x4 dunnage at a warehouse one day. I noticed it was a heavy piece. Took it home and ran a planer over it. beautiful piece of NZ Kaori. It turned well on my lathe

Turns nearly as good as Lignum Vitae, if I remember right Billy!