Red Sea Incident

JCochrane
6th November 2009, 15:41
Does anyone know anything about a "Red Sea Incident".* I realize this sounds very vague however my inquiry comes from a tinder box that was given to a William Cochrane (1846-1906) who was born in Liverpool, England and served on the White Star Line and the National & Clan Line. I have the names of some ships that he served on with the National Steam Navigation Company which travelled to the South Pacific, United States and East Indies.

This tinder box was given to him by a Dr. MacKenzie.

Any information appreciated.

wharferat
7th November 2009, 21:57
Googling turns up this amongst other recent, & biblical, references for "Red Sea Incident", from: http://www.paranaquecity.com/dongalo.html

"It was Nobember 29, 1574. The inhabitants of the town of Parañaque, a royal encomienda, was under heavy attack from the forces of the notorious Chinese pirate, Limahong, who were on their way to Intramuros, the seat of Spanish rule in the Philippines. Folk accounts have it that the inhabitants were at first disorganized, until a man from a barrio, by the name of Galo, came forward and took command. Under his able leadership, and with the arrival of Spanish forces led by Captain Juan de Salcedo from Ilocos, Limahong was repulsed and the occupation of the town was prevented.

The stiff resistance of the barrio residents shocked the Chinese pirate, who thought that capturing Manila would be easy. What Limahong did not expect was that the defenders of the community that would later be known as Dongalo, in spite of being ill-equipped, would fight to the end, so much so that the sea in front of the barrio turned red with their blood.

The battle became known as the "Red Sea Incident".

The Paraqueños not only saved their town, but they contributed decisively to Limahong's abandoning his plans to conquer the Philippines. In appreciation for Galo's leadership and heroic deeds, the Spanish authorities granted him the title of "Don". The barrio later on was named after him. Thus, Don Galo or Dongalo. "