Commuting in Style

fred henderson
5th October 2005, 22:55
Most of us have read descriptions of notable ocean going vessels, but the activities of inshore boats are less well known. In 1869 the Furness iron baron, Henry Schneider took delivery of a lavishly equipped 75 foot steam launch Esperance, for his use on Lake Windermere, where he had acquired Belsfield, the mansion on rising ground above Bowness Bay.
Each working morning, the butler – carrying breakfast on a silver tray – led his master down the path to the private jetty where Esperance was waiting. Breakfast was served in the ivory and gold saloon of the launch as she crossed Windermere to Lakeside Station; where Schneider’s private train was waiting to transport him to his office in Barrow.
What style!

Fred

Wallace
6th October 2005, 08:50
Hello Fred,
I remember doing quite alot of research for history project at Barrow on this gentleman in the 1960's,and the other fathers of the town. They certainly placed Barrow in Furness on the world stage,..... docks, steel and ships.
Still remember Schneider Square and his statue looking out towards the yards. Did you work at Vickers Armstrongs? Both my father and I did.
Have not seen Barrow , Coniston or Lakeside for many years but have fond memories.
As you say, such style , and its something we can not comprehend today when everything is fast paced and constantly being reviewed in the namesake of efficency.

all the best, and if you are from Barrow area, I was raised at Roose.

Wallace.

cockerhoop
6th October 2005, 12:53
The shipyard is still her, called BAE Systems now!!!!!!, not as big and certainly not thriving!!!, it is now bounded on the town side by retail parks.
i owned 1 house at Roose, 2 stonedyke cottages locally know as crash corner
Geoff

fred henderson
6th October 2005, 13:23
Hello Fred,
I remember doing quite alot of research for history project at Barrow on this gentleman in the 1960's,and the other fathers of the town. They certainly placed Barrow in Furness on the world stage,..... docks, steel and ships.
Still remember Schneider Square and his statue looking out towards the yards. Did you work at Vickers Armstrongs? Both my father and I did.
Have not seen Barrow , Coniston or Lakeside for many years but have fond memories.
As you say, such style , and its something we can not comprehend today when everything is fast paced and constantly being reviewed in the namesake of efficency.

all the best, and if you are from Barrow area, I was raised at Roose.

Wallace.

Hello Wallace. No I am not a Barrovian. I started my shipbuilding life with Hawthorn Leslie at Hebburn-on-Tyne but during my career I have been involved in a number of joint - venture projects with Barrow.

Fred

FLYERS
6th October 2005, 14:39
BARRA, What can you say about the place.?

I too have many fond memories of this here, I think I posted in another thread about the mass exodus that used to happen from Vickers when the hooter used to go at knocking off time.

Launch days were the best, the place used to buzz. Being with ATC of Liverpool we used to send boats up there to assist, usually four. I remeber the launch of the 'Invincible', band playing, crowds cheering and a figure emerging onto the deck of one of the tugs in top hat and tails. It was one of the deckies having his 'State Occassion' for the launch. Not only that, when we had eventually made fast he produced a guitar and stated to play a Beetles tune. God knows what those on shore looking thru binoculars made of the event.

Yep I was back in BARRA a few years ago to show the wife and family where we used to end up. A changed place from when i was there as said with all the new retail parks. the maritime museum however was very good, especially theway that they have used the old drydock as part of the project.

Memories, you can't take them away,

Cheers

ruud
6th October 2005, 15:29
Ahoy Fred,
Thanks for this fine story of British history, and she is still in good hands.
ESPERANCE(1869)
ss ESPERANCE
built by Thomas B Seath Rutherglen,
Propulsion: was steam, now a petrol engine
Built: 1869
Ship Type: Steam Yacht
Length: 65 feet
Owner History:
H. W. Schneider Lake Windemere
Status: Active - 2005

Remarks: From the National Historic Ships Committee: ESPERANCE is the oldest boat on Lloyd's Yacht Register and thought to be the first twin screw steam yacht was built in 1869 by T. B. Sheath & Co, Rutherglen for the Furness industrialist H.W. Schneider. She was transported to Barrow
in Furness and then brought by train to Lakeside. The double railway track had to be specially singled under the bridges to let her through. Her hull is of the highest grade iron made by one of Schneider's companies and the riveting is counter sunk to give an entirely smooth finish to the outside of the hull.

By 1900 ESPERANCE was owned by the Ferry Hotel and conveyed visitors and locals to the hotel for afternoon teas. Hotel guests were ferried up the lake in ESPERANCE for morning service at Wray Church.Later ESPERANCE became best known as Captain Flint's houseboat in the Arthur Ransome's classic children's novel 'Swallows and Amazons' and she was used as such by the BBC in their film adaptation. In 1941 ESPERANCE sank in 20ft of water but was successfully salvaged by T.C. Pattinson, successfully salvaged her despite the wartime shortage of tackle. Her steam engines were scrapped before the war and a petrol engine installed.


http://img400.imageshack.us/img400/6391/esperance18694tz.th.jpg (http://img400.imageshack.us/my.php?image=esperance18694tz.jpg)

fred henderson
6th October 2005, 16:51
Ahoy Fred,
Thanks for this fine story of British history, and she is still in good hands.
ESPERANCE(1869)
ss ESPERANCE
built by Thomas B Seath Rutherglen,
Propulsion: was steam, now a petrol engine
Built: 1869
Ship Type: Steam Yacht
Length: 65 feet
Owner History:
H. W. Schneider Lake Windemere
Status: Active - 2005

Remarks: From the National Historic Ships Committee: ESPERANCE is the oldest boat on Lloyd's Yacht Register and thought to be the first twin screw steam yacht was built in 1869 by T. B. Sheath & Co, Rutherglen for the Furness industrialist H.W. Schneider. She was transported to Barrow
in Furness and then brought by train to Lakeside. The double railway track had to be specially singled under the bridges to let her through. Her hull is of the highest grade iron made by one of Schneider's companies and the riveting is counter sunk to give an entirely smooth finish to the outside of the hull.

By 1900 ESPERANCE was owned by the Ferry Hotel and conveyed visitors and locals to the hotel for afternoon teas. Hotel guests were ferried up the lake in ESPERANCE for morning service at Wray Church.Later ESPERANCE became best known as Captain Flint's houseboat in the Arthur Ransome's classic children's novel 'Swallows and Amazons' and she was used as such by the BBC in their film adaptation. In 1941 ESPERANCE sank in 20ft of water but was successfully salvaged by T.C. Pattinson, successfully salvaged her despite the wartime shortage of tackle. Her steam engines were scrapped before the war and a petrol engine installed.


http://img400.imageshack.us/img400/6391/esperance18694tz.th.jpg (http://img400.imageshack.us/my.php?image=esperance18694tz.jpg)
Thank you for the photo ruud. Esperance was owned by Harry Schneider until his death in 1887, after which she was looked after by Mr Logan of the Ferry Hotel. In addition to the duties you mention ruud, she also transported Logans pack of foxhounds to meets

Fred

Wallace
7th October 2005, 00:40
The shipyard is still her, called BAE Systems now!!!!!!, not as big and certainly not thriving!!!, it is now bounded on the town side by retail parks.
i owned 1 house at Roose, 2 stonedyke cottages locally know as crash corner
Geoff
Hello Geoff,
I probably cycled past your place many times on the way to Leece, and well remember 'crash corner' painted on the brick wall near the methodist church.
Believe the workforce at BAE is only around a quarter what it was thirty years ago, still it survives , recall catching the bus home with all the fella's in overalls drenched in lathe coolants or welding spat.We were in South row, and I think at least 80% of the street (possibly town)relied on the yard for a crust.The last launch I witnessed was of H.M.S Splendid in 79 .
all the best.
Wallace.

Wallace
7th October 2005, 01:04
Hello Fred,
Thanks for your reply, it was a very interesting account, I see I got my wires crossed and meant of course Windermere ,not Coniston. Must have been thinking of Campbell!
A relative was one of the designers for the Pisces two man submarines project that Vickers undertook in the 60's, remember one sub got trapped I believe near Cork, both men on board were rescued . A more light hearted operation the subs undertook was on Loch Ness to confirm or deny the existance of the 'monster'.

regards Wallace.

R651400
7th October 2005, 16:54
Wonder if H W Schneider has any connection with 19th century French steel giant A & E Schneider, le Creusot, France?
Steam yacht "Esperance" hints of a french-connection.

R651400
10th October 2005, 06:38
Wonderful story of 19th century entente cordiale.
When Brunel first designed the ss "Great Britain" it was intended to be driven by paddles.The paddle shaft diameter was so large there was no hammer in existence that could forge such a size.
Brunel turned to James Nasmyth, Scottish inventor and industrialist, who drew up plans for a steam-hammer. Unfortunately Brunel abandonned paddle propulsion for screw and the steam hammer was confined to Nasmyth's "scheme book."
When French industrialist Schneider visited Nasmyth's factory to buy machine tools, unbeknown to Nasmyth, he was shown the steam-hammer plans by Nasmyth's partner.
Schneider returned to France and built a crude version of the hammer from memory. When Nasmyth next visited the Schneider works at le Creuzot, he was astonished at their high quality forging and asked how it was done. Schneider told him, "By your steam-hammer, you better hurry and get it patented!"
After refining Schneider's steam hammer, Nasmyth returned to the UK and fortunately was able to get his patent in both the UK and US.
Nasymth's steam-hammer was so well designed it could crack an egg without breaking the cup and at the same time forge gun barrels, huge drive shafts, complete anchors and the like, bringing forging into a new era.
From the steam-hammer Nasmyth developed the pile-driver used in building Westminster Bridge, Birkenhead and Grimsby docks to name but a few.