Tremo

John Tremelling
20th November 2009, 10:09
Good morning Gentlemen,

Recently clearing my attic I came across some old lead waterline 1/1200:1250 models which I acquired many years ago. Having put them on display my grandchildren have taken a great interest in them, since when I have aquired many more for their interest. They are mainly Treforest Mouldings, Tremo, of 1937-40, and I have taken an especial interest in this make and especially the story behind this short lived company. Consequently I am posting to ask if anyone else on this site has an interest in, or knowledge of this company or Identification Models. I am particularly seeking catalogues to try to ascertain the range of their products, I have a Tremo catalogue of 1940, but would wish to view and copy others, if anyone has such. I also have some others which I believe to be Naval Ship Identification models. I like these models because they have a 'chunky' archaic feel, and are not too delicate thus my grandchildren with their sometimes clumsy fingers can handle them rather than just stare at them in a catalogue, equally they are easier to refit with my ageing eyesight and arthritic hands.

Such models are of course mainly Grey Funnel Line, but I wish to get some real ships as well, (I never did work out where Grey Funnel Line ships stowed their cargoes?).

Thanks,

John T

Billieboy
20th November 2009, 12:11
Welcome aboard John, from the flat bit of Europe. Have a good look around and enjoy the trip.

Treforest moldings; one of the pioneers, in plastic transfer mouldings in the world! If the models are early, then they could be extremely valuable. I remember seeing their works at the Treforest Trading Estate in '48/9, which was itself one of the pioneering industrial park/estates in the immediate postwar period.

rickles23
20th November 2009, 12:53
Hi,
These guys might be able to help:
http://www.shipmodels.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk/default.htm
Regards

John Tremelling
21st November 2009, 11:20
Thanks Rick, that site is one of my sources.

Billie Boy, I did not know that Tremo pioneered plastic. I am particularly interested in the lead models of 1937-40 which was then on Treforest Industrial Estate. One of the founders Freiedrich Winkler, a German Jew escaping from the Nazis, was interned in 1940 and the company then went into liquidation. I have come across suggestions that other employees emigrated to the US and made USN Identification Models. Winkler apparently emigrated to South Africa after the war, although the moulds quite obviously survived as some models were again alledgedly produced after the war. Your suggestion of plastic models is fascinating. Do you have evidence other than personal recollections?

There is apparently one book by an Italian Michele Morciano, Classic Waterline Ship Models, which deals briefly with the company, but otherwise very little, which is why I am sourcing original models, catalogues and personal anecdotes to try to piece something together. Any information most welcome.

Thanks for your interest,

John T

Billieboy
21st November 2009, 14:21
Thanks Rick, that site is one of my sources.

Billie Boy, I did not know that Tremo pioneered plastic. I am particularly interested in the lead models of 1937-40 which was then on Treforest Industrial Estate. One of the founders Freiedrich Winkler, a German Jew escaping from the Nazis, was interned in 1940 and the company then went into liquidation. I have come across suggestions that other employees emigrated to the US and made USN Identification Models. Winkler apparently emigrated to South Africa after the war, although the moulds quite obviously survived as some models were again alledgedly produced after the war. Your suggestion of plastic models is fascinating. Do you have evidence other than personal recollections?

There is apparently one book by an Italian Michele Morciano, Classic Waterline Ship Models, which deals briefly with the company, but otherwise very little, which is why I am sourcing original models, catalogues and personal anecdotes to try to piece something together. Any information most welcome.

Thanks for your interest,

John T

John,

I remember the lead(Pb) models, they used to be in the window of the Meccano shop on Holton Road Barry, when I was about five or six, always wanted to get a full fleet collection, but could never get enough pocket money together. There were also Zinc models of AA guns and Howitzers from the same makers.

Regarding plastic mouldings, my parents lodged with a Jewish family in Cathedral Road Cardiff for a time with me from birth until I was six months old. The family was called Joseph, who were still friendly after the war, I can remember being given a light blue plastic, (probably similar to Tupperware polyurethane), plate, cup and saucer, I also remember that Mr. Joseph said that it was one of the first sets in the world! The year was about 1946 or early '47. The Company, Treforest Mouldings, which had stopped during the war, was apparently taken over or bought by Mr. Joseph and his associates but keeping the name on the building.

That's about all I can remember, I do hope that it will be of some assistance in your pursuit of knowledge.

John Tremelling
21st November 2009, 15:34
Plastic wares? Yet another puzzle Billie. The metal model ships were indeed expensive at the time, my 1940 catalogue lists HMS Hood, Nelson, Rodney and carriers as being 3/9, most battleships 2/9, cruisers from 1/9 to 2/6, destroyers from 1/- to 1/3, the cheapest being MTB's at 4d. At these prices I had always thought them to be collectors or rich kids toys.

Thanks for your recollections.

John T

Billieboy
22nd November 2009, 14:12
I remember getting, "Warspite", one Christmas, when I was 3 or 4, kept it for years, but I had two younger brothers and it dissapeared when I started reading Biggles.

John Tremelling
23rd November 2009, 11:01
Warspite seems to have been one of the most popular of their models Billie. Certainly it was a ship with a history, and there seem to be more models about now that any other. I have a couple, both decrepit, but in line for a refit to original 'as sold' condition.

John T

stores
23rd November 2009, 13:41
hi from stores, as a restorer and collector of 1/1200 scale ship models that was interesting, i was not aware they made plastiic ships, i dont collect tremo, a lot of people do, i buy most of mine on ebay, type in 1/1200 and u will get ships to that scale, or triang minic ships , they come up now and then, give u an idea of what they sell for, i collect and restore the triang models, as spare funnels and masts are available in white metal, more detailed models, just managed to aquire 2 of cunards Franconia, extremely rare , only 500 made.one from USA and one from Holland, first one in original box worth 500 second no box worth about 300, i sometimes put extra detail on them or repaint them in different colours when the ship was sold and re named, have just done queen mary and elizabeth in wartime grey, best wishes, STORES.

John Tremelling
23rd November 2009, 19:23
Thanks Q, I refit (reovate) Tremo's. I do monitor Ebay and have had a few bargains from there, however, sometimes they go for silly prices.

Best wishes,

John T

stores
24th November 2009, 16:13
website, waterline model ships sometimes has them for sale, worth a look ! STORES.

Les Smith
31st December 2009, 02:46
The available Treforest Mouldings (Tremo) catalogues comprise two distinct sets of documents – the more general lists of “all the world’s fighting ships” and the partially illustrated list of Royal Navy ships of 1940 vintage. The former is basically a list of the major ships from Janes Fighting Ships 1939.

Two recent photographs on the Vectis auction site (see links below) give a tantalising glimpse of potential Treforest Mouldings Warships not listed in the illustrated 1940 catalogue/list but listed in the general listing for the Royal Navy at a price of 3/9 (3s 9d). In the 1940 list these are shown as “new construction” but it has often been assumed that these were never produced as the company went into liquidation in 1940.

http://www.vectis.co.uk/Page/ViewAuctionLots.aspx?AuctionId=334&DayNo=2&Section=188&Sub=0&Start=20


http://www.vectis.co.uk/Page/ViewLot.aspx?LotId=354145&Section=188&Sub=0


Ship Class Launched

HMS Illustrious Illustrious 5 April 1939

HMS Victorious Illustrious 19 September 1939

HMS Formidable Illustrious 17 August 1939

HMS Indomitable Illustrious 26 March 1940

I have been collecting Tremo ships from worldwide sources for a number of years and have never seen examples of these. The fact that the company actually produced boxes listing these must indicate that they had produced – or had plans to imminently produce these models.

Does anyone have examples of these? - if so, I would be interested in seeing a photograph.

Other ships in the “new construction” category include:

King George V class battleships

Fiji and Dido class cruisers

U class submarines

Tribal, J, K and I class destroyers were listed as “new construction” but were produced and are commonly encountered.

Uncommon/rare Tremos still crop up from time – I recently obtained the Argentinian cruiser “La Argentina” unexpectedly in a batch of other vessels.

I would be interested to hear of any “unusual” Tremos that people have or have come across.

Regards

Les

Robin Wishart
19th February 2010, 13:27
Hello all, I am also very interested in Tremo models, I have a collection of 22 of them which includes set no. 1, set no. 4 plus 13 others. Unusual ones I suspect are the Graf Spee in perfect cond [all three masts], Jean d' arc, USS Astoria and U59. There are 7 HMS cruisers [ Belfast, Kent etc.] Hood, 2 Tribals etc. I am not looking to sell these but would interested to hear what the community thought. They were all bought by my father in 39/40 in West Kilbride Scotland and very carefully played with on the billiards table all during the war. My father was just too young to fight, his big brother was however on 6 destroyers during the war as 'guns' officer, HMS Zulu being his longest serving ship until she was bombed and sank after a failed commando raid at Trobruk. He died on HMS Kite on the last convoy to Russia in 44. These models had a very special place in his heart which is why I do not want to sell them. Robin.

Les Smith
25th February 2010, 23:32
Hello all, I am also very interested in Tremo models, I have a collection of 22 of them which includes set no. 1, set no. 4 plus 13 others. Unusual ones I suspect are the Graf Spee in perfect cond [all three masts], Jean d' arc, USS Astoria and U59. There are 7 HMS cruisers [ Belfast, Kent etc.] Hood, 2 Tribals etc. I am not looking to sell these but would interested to hear what the community thought. They were all bought by my father in 39/40 in West Kilbride Scotland and very carefully played with on the billiards table all during the war. My father was just too young to fight, his big brother was however on 6 destroyers during the war as 'guns' officer, HMS Zulu being his longest serving ship until she was bombed and sank after a failed commando raid at Trobruk. He died on HMS Kite on the last convoy to Russia in 44. These models had a very special place in his heart which is why I do not want to sell them. Robin.
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Robin this is a great collection. -Graf Spee is the most common of the German ships but is still uncommon. Jeanne d'Arc and Astoria and U59 rare and I suspect that the U-boot will be similar to the Wiking models but it will be interesting to see. The sets are extremely rare (even if they contain ships which are individually common).

Regards

Les Smith