Chief Stewards good and bad

Sabastapol
24th November 2009, 18:56
On Neocardia part of Shell's eastern fleet we of course had a Chinese crew. All ships of the Eastern Fleet did. They were very good with certain exeptions. The Chief steward and second steward we had were as different as chalk and cheese. The former was a fat round individual who crept around everything and everybody, the latter was short thin and a definite communist stirer whom I had logged on a number of occasions for disobedience. The chief steward was always sucking air between his teeth when he spoke, not a very likeable chap. As 2nd mate it was part of my job to oversee the catering. One day he came to my cabin saying 'I want speeky you about 2nd steward.' He proceeded to explain that neither he nor the other stewards or other crew members liked this man. He obviously knew that I didn't either; with that in mind proceeded to tell me in no uncertain terms that should I desire it, he had plenty of friends in Singapore who would be only too pleased to hasten his departure from this earth!!. Many visions passed through my mind at the time. One was having my name plastered over the front of the Straits Times for conspiracy to murder. Any way the chief steward left my cabin a little disillusioned. Food was generally good on Chinese crew ships. The only other crew I sailed with was Spanish; quite a novelty. The food was not too bad either.

paisleymerchant
24th November 2009, 19:01
I thought it was the Chief Steward's job to take care of the Catering !

Why a 2nd mate was doing it is a puzzle or was the Ch/Stwd that bad that you did not trust him to do the job ? in that case he should have been sacked.

I only sailed with British crews so apologise if foreign crews were run different

As to Chief Stewards I have to say that in 17 years I never sailed with a bad one

ALAN TYLER
25th November 2009, 15:16
I thought it was the Chief Steward's job to take care of the Catering !

Why a 2nd mate was doing it is a puzzle or was the Ch/Stwd that bad that you did not trust him to do the job ? in that case he should have been sacked.

I only sailed with British crews so apologise if foreign crews were run different

As to Chief Stewards I have to say that in 17 years I never sailed with a bad one

I agree with the first three lines, as for never sailed with a bad one!!!! Unfortunately I came across a few in 23 years, especially the one who used to lock himself in the bond locker and only come out when he was so full of booze he didn,t know where he was!!
The best I sailed with was of course myself (only joking). Sailed on the Sir Andrew Duncan in the 60,s

surfaceblow
25th November 2009, 15:53
In over 30 years of sailing on American Ships there have been very few good Stewards, more than a few bad ones. Most of the Stewards were mediocre in their jobs. How bad can you get with a fixed weekly menu set by the unlicensed Union Contract even the peanut butter brand was dictated by the contract and a fixed storing list when ordered in the states.

My pet peeve was the Stewards that would not put the fresh fruit out before they went bad and had to be cleared out of the Vegetable Box and put in the trash. One of my earlier jobs while in high school was working in the produce department of a grocery store I would go the produce mart twice a week and pick up the fresh fruit and vegetables. I would also remove the over ripe produce off of the display counters.

Joe

john fraser
25th November 2009, 19:05
I agree with the first three lines, as for never sailed with a bad one!!!! Unfortunately I came across a few in 23 years, especially the one who used to lock himself in the bond locker and only come out when he was so full of booze he didn,t know where he was!!
The best I sailed with was of course myself (only joking). Sailed on the Sir Andrew Duncan in the 60,s

Sailed with a few bad Chief Stewards but in 49 years sailed with a lot of bad Masters,Chief Officers and Chief Engineers

Pat Kennedy
25th November 2009, 20:09
Of all the Chief stewards I have known, only two stand out; 'Motorbike' Griffiths in Blue Funnel, who marched to a different drum but was generous with the grub, and Jimmy Duffy in T & J Harrisons, a good friend and a fine Chief Steward.
Pat

makko
25th November 2009, 20:52
Pat,
I thoroughly agree with you - Ron 'Motorbike' Griffiths, a great ChStwd, a veritable BF legend and a great bloke to boot! I wonder if he is still around - He was from New Brighton.
Regards,
Dave

Macphail
25th November 2009, 21:12
John Hankin was a good Chief Steward with BF , a very good sense of humour.

John.

bluestar boy stiff
25th November 2009, 21:22
Of all the Chief stewards I have known, only two stand out; 'Motorbike' Griffiths in Blue Funnel, who marched to a different drum but was generous with the grub, and Jimmy Duffy in T & J Harrisons, a good friend and a fine Chief Steward.
Pat

Motor Bike Griff that old scoundrel i sailed with him on the P&OCL he was a good old boy he is still alive
(Thumb)

Pat Kennedy
25th November 2009, 21:28
Pat,
I thoroughly agree with you - Ron 'Motorbike' Griffiths, a great ChStwd, a veritable BF legend and a great bloke to boot! I wonder if he is still around - He was from New Brighton.
Regards,
Dave
Dave,
I dont know if he is still with us, I last saw him in the Hotel Victoria in NB, holding forth with a group of his friends, must be over twenty years ago.
A couple more Chiefs from Blueys have come to mind, Jake Finn and Johnny Barton, both from Wallasey, and both drank in the Primrose when home on leave, in fact, Johnny Barton lived next door to that pub.
Regards,
Pat(Thumb)

MARINEJOCKY
25th November 2009, 21:49
There is a certain "wee" fellow who is a regular contributor to the various threads on this site and I can honestly say he was probably the best I sailed with.

We did not have chief stewards on the FOC ships I was on as the old man took care of that.

Many stories out there about an ex RSM who worked for Houlders and when I was on the Uncle John (North Sea) for a short period the food was fantastic but I can not tell you who was in charge.

I think the feeding rate back then on Houlders Gas boats was about 1.50 pounds per man per day but in the North Sea it was about 11 pounds per man per day or at least it felt like it. All of the reguar lads were on diets but I knew I was only going to be there for a few days so I ate like a pig.

ALAN TYLER
26th November 2009, 11:13
I wonder if that "Wee" fellow has the initials L.H. a good man and long time ship mate. Pleased to say I worked on the "Uncle John" as both Ch/Cook and Ch/Steward, cost was not really a problem in the 70s/80s. Happy Days.

MARINEJOCKY
26th November 2009, 15:46
Alan,

You get the prize for guessing the Initials correctly.

Am I right in remembering on the Uncle John in the dining area there was a small room you first stood in line in and then you collected your food. I do remember there was the regular lads getting a peice of fish and rice thanks to there diets and then there was me trying to get three steaks and as many fries (chips) on one plate. It was vertically challenged.

Then there was the desert shelves with all kinds of cakes and soft ice cream.

Am I just dreaming or after 36 years do I still remember. I was onboard when it came in from Norway to the Tyne and was the first vessel in the world to be in two dry docks at the same time.

I think I had met LH not long before that on the Cumbria.

Peter (Pat) Baker
26th November 2009, 15:56
The best Chief Steward I ever sailed with was Jackie Moore of Harrisons of Liverpool. Fantastic food and a great guy.
Incidentally I used to drink in the Primrose when I was on leave.
Pat Baker.

Pat Kennedy
26th November 2009, 21:36
The best Chief Steward I ever sailed with was Jackie Moore of Harrisons of Liverpool. Fantastic food and a great guy.
Incidentally I used to drink in the Primrose when I was on leave.
Pat Baker.
Peter,
At the time I'm talking about, late fifties to about 1970, Ted Savage the ex Man Utd and Liverpool footballer was the boss of the Primrose, and his wife Anne and delicious daughter Lorna used to run it. A splendid pub full of seamen in those days.
We used to fall out of there at ten thirty and go straight into the British Legion next door, then taxis down to the Davy Jones Locker at Eggie Ferry until all hours.
happy days.
Regards,
Pat(Thumb)

john fraser
26th November 2009, 21:57
Alan,

You get the prize for guessing the Initials correctly.

Am I right in remembering on the Uncle John in the dining area there was a small room you first stood in line in and then you collected your food. I do remember there was the regular lads getting a peice of fish and rice thanks to there diets and then there was me trying to get three steaks and as many fries (chips) on one plate. It was vertically challenged.

Then there was the desert shelves with all kinds of cakes and soft ice cream.

Am I just dreaming or after 36 years do I still remember. I was onboard when it came in from Norway to the Tyne and was the first vessel in the world to be in two dry docks at the same time.

I think I had met LH not long before that on the Cumbria.

Uncle John still working in the Gulf of Mexico.The last feeding rate I knew about for the company(Caldive) was 15 USD per man per day

ROBERT HENDERSON
26th November 2009, 22:10
The best feeding ship I sailed on was Buries Marks La Cordillera with a full female catering staff. The only thing they never seemed to get right was BOT duff, they were great for football practise.

Regards Robert

stores
26th November 2009, 23:47
only one bad chief steward, on a certain trinity house steamship, i was fireman in boiler room, used to get really hot, came off watch at midnight and no dry tea, gasping for a cup, saw him next day , he replied you have had your rations, got a weekly supply, not weighed, but guessed, one tin of condensed milk per man per week, in 1975, when i said we want correct bread rations per man and everything weighed, his tune changed, anytime we ran out of tea we got it, STORES.

frank fish
27th November 2009, 11:22
Regarding Shell Eastern Most of the old Chief Srewards were from Hainan and whilst may have been able to process accounts in Chinese were not considered able to navigate there way around the complicated paterwork dreamt up by the soothsayers in Shell House. Hence the job of administering the bond and the food stores was usually given to the 2nd /3rd Mate or Sparks for the sum of 6 per month each. Later on with Hong Kong Crews it became much more usual for the Chinese Ch Stwd to take over these responsibilities but I doubt if he got the extra 12 for doing them

ALAN TYLER
27th November 2009, 11:39
Hi Malcolm, Glad about getting the initials right, won,t say anymore about the "wee" man as he might read this and get big headed!! Can,t remember the small room in the dining area, though queueing was the norm. I was on the Tyne with both the U.J. & Oregis and on the occasion when they were there together. I posted a photo of this momentous moment on the Houlder Offshore thread. Three steaks!! weren.t you hungry? I.ve some old menus somewhere hopefully I can get round to posting them on the Houlder Offshore site and get you "Salivating"
Regards Alan

MARINEJOCKY
27th November 2009, 12:48
Alan, I think he is reading it all and feeling pretty good about himself, strange he has not made any comments.

When I was writing about the Uncle John I was going to mention that the Oregis was there at the same time but I could not remember exactly. Was the Oregis back in being fixed after the grounding as I think the UJ came after the Black Midden grounding.

Also do you call oil rigs and "things" like the UJ her or she like a ship or are they referred to as "it".

I was on the UJ on the Tyne when the extra ballast tanks were fitted to the outside of the legs afer the initial sea trial.

ALAN TYLER
1st December 2009, 11:32
Hi Malcolm, I joined the Oregis in Aberdeen the first time and "she" was the HTS Coupler 1, reverted back to Oregis in 1976. This was after the Middens incident. I was on the UJ or Oregis till 1981 when I went to the KUK, S/Driller and finally Bay Driller. till 1986. Regards calling them "She" Oregis/UJ were "she,s" KUK ? the two drillers were Jack-up rigs and you didn,t get a stamp in your Discharge book so I think they were "Its"!!!! Regards Alan.

jerryray
5th December 2009, 11:35
Port line wanted some beating for great feeders, so I guess that made the chief stwds good .

Peter (Pat) Baker
5th December 2009, 15:55
Pat Kennedy,
Pat,
yes I well remember those days in the Primrose.
I was always in the Landlords good books as everytime I visited
Havana in the late 50's and 1960's I made sure I brought him some really good
cigars.
Dickie Turnbull, Chief Officer in Harrisons, who lived in Manor Road, used to
join me there whenever we were on leave at the same time.
Like yourself I am Wallasey born and bred, and went to Oldershaw Grammar
school.
All the very best to you and hopefully I will hear more from you.
Cheers,
Pat Baker.

Jim Brady
5th December 2009, 20:23
If I remember rightly in the 50's60's the victualing rate was seven shillings per man per day.If the Chief Steward kept that rate down he was classed as a "Good" Chief Steward by the Company,a good "Belly Robber!!"
Do we have any "Bowaters" men who can confirm that the food on the "Bowaters" ships was second to none.A selection of Fruit Juice and cereals for breakfast,not just for the Saloon but for the crew mess.
I was told by a few guys I sailed with that the rate in "Bowaters" was a couple of shillings per day more than the average shipping companys.
One guy told me a Chief Steward doing his first trip with "Bowaters" could'nt wait to tell the Catering Super how he had brought the rate down.
The Catering Super said "The stores are put on the ship to feed the crew well your fired!!!"
Regards,
Jim B.

roboted
15th March 2010, 20:05
Just an engineer poking his nose in,When with Bluey and ED...Only ever sailed with good CS's and never a bad feeder,no matter what run or crew...
Fair play to them.....and the catering people...

sparkie2182
15th March 2010, 21:35
Wee George Wilson.......Scottish Ch. Steward with Port Line and later the A.C.T. boats.

Excellent man..........Couldn't miss him out of this thread.

tracyleanne
17th September 2010, 13:12
All 3 burries Marks ships I was on were (Bare Minimum) as gally boy on the La Maria (ss cockroach) I spent hours siving out the weavals from the rice

melhopkins
8th January 2011, 13:47
Mel Hopkins from cardiff is my Father .... Did anyone work with him ??

Jacko123
22nd January 2011, 06:34
A bit late for this thread. I joined the Pool Fisher about 1967 as an A/S. I was a tanker or deepsea cargo A/s, but it was a very bad time at Dock Street/KGV pools, no ships at all. I went down to Felixstowe and signed on and the first thing the skipper did was give me a Fiver to get the nights tea for 13 crew and a lorry driver. I asked where the chief steward or cook was and was told he was missing (cook steward), probably in pub. I went to the local chip-shop and got a fivers worth. I stayed on her for 2 months and left to join Shell Voluta. I always remember the skipper going ashore in Felixstowe with his shopping basket. I just read on this site that she was lost with 11 out of 13 men. I can't remember the skippers or anyone's name, only 2nd engineer Montezi Graziani (Monty)my boozeing companion in Rotterdam alt weekends. Very sad to read she sank

Pilot mac
22nd January 2011, 09:02
Sailed with many Chief Stewards over the years, Brits, Indian and Chinese. A dificult job as I was to find out when sailing as Master (on a real FOC!) when I had to do it. At the end of every month had to do an inventory of all food stores to calculate feeding rate, what a nightmare! Never managed to be within budget. Never a bad word about Chief Stewards since. Memorable Chief stewards include Roger Broad from London and Arthur Glendinning from British West Hartlepool.

Dave

R58484956
23rd January 2011, 15:22
Caught the CS out on a Castle boat, barracuda in the fridge room, some exotic fish on the menu, mentioned this to him and the beer flowed quite well the rest of the trip.

keithsparks
2nd February 2011, 13:10
I first went to sea in 56 as bell boy on the Empire Fowey trooping via the cape to the Far east I did two trips on this ship the second one thru the Suez just reopened after the war there,during the voyage I had to deliver a few telegrams to passengers from the radio room and I stood opened mouthed looking at all the radio equipment and decided there and then that was the job for me I signed off in Southampton after telling the chief steward what I was going to do hee roared with laughter telling everyone in earshot that this Yorkshire pudding was going to become a sparks.I never did meet up with that chief and his name evades me now but I would have given a years wages to shove my radio cert and radar cert right up that little fat b........... a....

redgreggie
7th May 2011, 10:30
best one I recall was on Federal Line's Dorset back in 1966, can only remember his first name was Royston, really good guy, left us to it in the Galley.

I was Galley Boy and worked with a great cook from East London and an even better baker, a Polish guy I think and he was from around the Southend area, Leigh-on Sea I believe.

great guys one and all.

best ship I was ever on, I use to keep their cabins clean for them, they both rewarded me handsomely, when we paid off in Falmouth dry-dock, during the strike, I was that eager to get home and never waited around for the cook to pay me, I had over 100 in my pocket, that was BIG money back then.
was making my way to the railway station and a taxi pulled up, it was the cook and he paid me there and then, never tried to avoid it, shipmates for you.

I am a Sheffield Wednesday fan, we got to Wembley in the FA cup final against Everton that year, the match was played when we were in Wellington, the cook had a radio in his cabin and he told me not to turn too but to listen to the match in his cabin, that's shipmates for you.

we lost, still a great day though.







ray.............in Batley.


would love to hear from anybody that was on that trip, I've left numerous threads asking that question all to no avail, oh, well, keep hoping.

barrinoz
8th May 2011, 03:00
If I may contribute another light-hearted extract from a previous post of mine on ships' personnel. Just a bit of fun, lads, so don't get tetchy.

"Next come the catering department. The catering department existed to wipe the noses and other anatomical extremities of officers and engineers who, apparently, were incapable of making their own bunks, tidying their own cabins or pouring their own tea.
Top of the pile was the Chief Steward who was, actually, a real estate mogul with apartments and villas in exotic locations like Cote D 'azure and Costa Del Sol, all funded from the proceeds of the illegal sale of the provisions meant for the rest of the ship's complement.The second steward was a Chief steward-in-waiting. "Whit? Anither bar of Knight's Castile soap! Didn't ye buy one three weeks ago? Whit ye daein' wi' it, son, eating it? Awa' ye go, laddie, shower wi' a friend”.
barinoz.

tom roberts
8th May 2011, 12:38
Sailed on a certain palm boat the chief was a belly robber he bought a parrot down the coast used to hang it outside his cabin, each time we passed it we used to curse to it something awful,I wonder if it repeated it when he tookit home,bloody hope so.

Burned Toast
8th May 2011, 20:02
(LOL)(==D)Give them plenty one between twenty(Applause)

alan ward
12th October 2011, 14:41
I once a right nasty experience with an Old Man and food.I`d done 5 years at sea having spent the previous 2 and a half years as an AP/CO with Clan Line before getting a job as PCO with Sugar Line so menu planning and costs were no problem to me.I should have suspected things could go **** up when he told me I had to take a weeks menus up to him for`vetting`He was a strange looking little feller a dead ringer for Jimmy Clitheroe,he always made you sit down before he spoke to you to make you look shorter,a midget would have towered over him.Sugar Line had a menu book,so I selected their dishes combined with a few of my own.On taking them up to Jimmy C he put a pencil line through,cheese at lunchtime,salad at dinner,choice of desserts both mealtimes,soup or fruit....one or the other!
I did one trip with them and baled out,he complained that I drank with the crew i.e.Chief Cook and some of the boys,we went to Osaka castle to watch a samurai festival.I wound up treating two of the officers for a dose who went elsewhere.

lordgregory1
18th September 2012, 16:01
I joined the "SHAFTESBURY",(HOULDER BROTHERS) in manchester docks OCT69, the chief steward was a really nice guy, although he was gay!, bald, but always very smart, spoke very posh! seem to remember his first name was ERIC. Anyone remember him?, age back then would be around 35-40.

A.D.FROST
18th September 2012, 16:33
No good Chief Thiefs just some better than others.(Ouch)

Burned Toast
18th September 2012, 18:33
I joined the "SHAFTESBURY",(HOULDER BROTHERS) in manchester docks OCT69, the chief steward was a really nice guy, although he was gay!, bald, but always very smart, spoke very posh! seem to remember his first name was ERIC. Anyone remember him?, age back then would be around 35-40.


Sailed with Eric on the Abadesa, around 67.

john fraser
18th September 2012, 19:00
No good Chief Thiefs just some better than others.(Ouch)

Same applies to Chief Engineers and Masters

nosinner
20th September 2012, 13:05
One of the best I sailed under was Jack Dempster on Houlders Duquesa in 1966/7, he was from my home town of Hull and was universally respected by all departments. In 1972 after I had left the MN he came into the Workingmans Club I was Steward of & asked me to rejoin as his 2nd, I turned him down & often wondered if I did the right thing.
"ce la vie"(Pint) I suppose

joebuckham
20th September 2012, 13:20
Same applies to Chief Engineers and Masters

the same applies to the whole human race(Sad)

jg grant
21st September 2012, 10:21
AD #40 very sad

guinnessmick
21st September 2012, 11:19
a lot of chief stewards who kept the food down to a minimum did so so they could sell the surplus stores to line their own pockets the company put the stores aboard to use

bryanm
21st September 2012, 11:41
I am not saying this did'nt happen in some cases but it
seems a bit harsh to imply that every chief steward was
doing it.

alan ward
21st September 2012, 16:56
#46 Too much time listening to and believing scuttle butt,thieve or belly rob and you don`t keep your job.It was to our advantage to always do the best we could to look after you,feed you,treat the horrible diseases you picked up,arrange your subs,toilet paper,soap,keep the bond,accounts,port entry,get you paid accurately and make sure you got home.What a bunch of thieving bastards we were.

MARINEJOCKY
21st September 2012, 17:41
Well Leo ?

They all had a job to do but all of them kept me fed & watered so no complaints & Leo certainly was one of the best!

Pat Kennedy
21st September 2012, 18:06
My cousin was Chief Steward/purser in Brocks.
He freely admitted selling all sorts of stores and provisions while the ship was in ports around the Indian coast.
He even flogged a spare mooring rope in Calcutta!
He was eventually found out and sacked. He never went to sea again, and I'm glad I never sailed with him.
His justification was that he was at the time an alcoholic and an inveterate gambler.
Pat

Burned Toast
21st September 2012, 18:09
#46 Too much time listening to and believing scuttle butt,thieve or belly rob and you don`t keep your job.It was to our advantage to always do the best we could to look after you,feed you,treat the horrible diseases you picked up,arrange your subs,toilet paper,soap,keep the bond,accounts,port entry,get you paid accurately and make sure you got home.What a bunch of thieving bastards we were.


Should note bite Alan(Fly) Let them live in ignorance, part timers.(Sad):sweat:

Ray

MARINEJOCKY
21st September 2012, 19:24
...and the money made from selling dunnage from the deck and scrap from the engine room was sent back to the company ?.

john fraser
21st September 2012, 21:08
...and the money made from selling dunnage from the deck and scrap from the engine room was sent back to the company ?.

Don,t forget the deposit on the empty 40 gallon oil drums !

MARINEJOCKY
21st September 2012, 22:06
John, were you with us when we did that ?. or selling one gallon of paint and four gallons of water in the "un-opened" five gallon cans when passing thru' Suez. No wonder the muslims hate us so much

john fraser
22nd September 2012, 09:02
John, were you with us when we did that ?. or selling one gallon of paint and four gallons of water in the "un-opened" five gallon cans when passing thru' Suez. No wonder the muslims hate us so much
No I am afraid not. What I was referring to was the "fiddling" that Chief Stewards were accused of. The engineroom used to get 40 gall.drums of oil on board in Singapore with a deposit on the drums.When returned the deposit was used by them for a "piss up"Surely if the Chief was honest it should have been returned to the company.I saw a lot of fiddling among department heads in my time at sea,but the Chief Steward always got the blame.When a master retired he got a holiday in Hong kong living in the Shipchandlers house.The Chief Steward didn,t.All we ever bought from him was fresh veg and salads for about a month

Rogerfrench
22nd September 2012, 15:59
I can hardly believe that this thread has gone on so long without at least one post from an ex-ED guy referring to Ken Onions, and parrot Hook.

I knew Ken on the Sekondi, great chap, loads of fun, and a good host ashore, too.

MARINEJOCKY
22nd September 2012, 18:06
and what I was referring too was the 15 tons of oil that came onboard in 50 gallon drums and we flogged the drums in the canal which paid for a good few parties

makko
22nd September 2012, 19:48
A joint effort in BF to avid any misunderstandings - Oil drums "sold" for soft shell crabs and satay sticks in Indonesia, other places a gash fund to buy beer and steaks for a barbecue (for the entire crew). Lord, I miss the satay and peanut sauce! Last ate it in an Indonesian restaurant in Amsterdam in 2003 with the family! I ordered, everything got scoffed double quick. I called the waitress over,"Same again miss!", "Yes - everything and double satay!".
Rgds.
Dave

eldersuk
23rd September 2012, 00:06
I can hardly believe that this thread has gone on so long without at least one post from an ex-ED guy referring to Ken Onions, and parrot Hook.

I knew Ken on the Sekondi, great chap, loads of fun, and a good host ashore, too.


When EDs were in the process of laying people off, Ken joined Harrison's. Sadly he died soon after .... don't know about Hook.

Derek

Varley
23rd September 2012, 00:08
Makko,

Denholm's (and others??) H-K Chinese crews! - You would have done a double header for the standard Sunday lunch. Bugger roast Tom turkey - "Nasi Goreng" - actually a fusion dish with pork Satay, special fried rice and a fried egg and often 'seconds'.

How I miss that! And how my doctor says I should continue so doing!.

oldman 80
23rd September 2012, 01:26
Ah Denholm once again.
Yes most of the Chinese crewed ships fed very well, but the best feeders in my view were the two Chemical Tankers - Venturer and Explorer.
Both had Indian Crews (ex Mckinnon Mckenzie) but the Chief Steward was British.
The two regulars were Phil Milne - ex Bibby's and Jimmy Prentice - the finest Chief Stewards you could wish for, exceptionally popular with one and all. The Feeding was excellent, with curry three times a day (as a choice), vegetable curry at Breakfast. Those curries were just magnificent - absolutely they were, so much so my stomach is just screaming out for one now. Sadly I don't think they could be replicated today.
:sweat:

John Dryden
23rd September 2012, 02:10
I always remember my first captains inspection as an appy in Bank Line.The first man in was the Chief Steward followed by the Master.That alone said more than what you have for dinner.

makko
23rd September 2012, 02:58
Makko,

Denholm's (and others??) H-K Chinese crews! - You would have done a double header for the standard Sunday lucnch. Bugger roast Tom turkey - "Nasi Goreng" - actually a fusion dish with pork Satay, special fried rice and a fried egg and often 'seconds'.

How I miss that! And how my doctor says I should continue so doing!.

Hey Varley,
Thanks for reminding me - I forgot Nasi Goreng with chile sauce, eat with a spoon! Also real "baltis", literally buckets of rice and curry for Sunday lunch.
Now, I have to rustle up something tomorrow to surprise the family!
Rgds.
Dave

trotterdotpom
23rd September 2012, 10:41
Nasi Goreng ... foreign muck apart from the fried egg sitting on top. Apart from that, some of my best friends were Chief Stewards ... a much maligned breed.

John T

Varley
23rd September 2012, 10:47
- I forgot Nasi Goreng with chile sauce, eat with a spoon!

Dave, I wish I could join you but that's too long a hop (I won't even go to London save family emergencies, or their conclusions anyway). Don't forget the peanuts with the satay sauce.

As an aside - my paternal grandparents were married in Mexico and favourite uncle 'Bruv' was born there. Seems there was quite a market for ex-pats there at the turn of last century GP was with the Neuchatel Asphalt Co (perhaps still then the marvellously names Neuchatel Bituminous Rock Co.) so I suppose he was metalling Mexico's roads. I have a newsclipping of a Great Uncle arriving on Californian to visit in 1909 - strange then that the album does not mention Titanic - obviously none of the family aboard!.

David V

Ron Stringer
23rd September 2012, 11:17
I have a newsclipping of a Great Uncle arriving on Californian to visit in 1909 - strange then that the album does not mention Titanic - obviously non of the family aboard!

Maybe not so strange. Arrival of Californian 1909; maiden voyage of Titanic 1912. Back to the Future? [=P]

alan ward
23rd September 2012, 12:44
This was posted elsewhere in error so I`ll try again.
How did a Chief Steward obtain access to a deck store to nick a mooring rope and how long did it take this superhuman to carry it ashore with no-one noticing?I suspect as well as his other shortcomings terminal bullshitting may well be added.

guinnessmick
23rd September 2012, 12:56
i did not say that all c/stewards where at it but if the cap fits so to speak

Varley
23rd September 2012, 13:57
Maybe not so strange. Arrival of Californian 1909; maiden voyage of Titanic 1912. Back to the Future? [=P]

Ron, I would agree but several other world events got in (death of the Britishly wifed Kaiser and on up to and beyond WWI) wouldn't you have put in a clipping associating the two ships if you had a family link with one of them? I think we were too big headed to consider even an entry along the lines of "Maritime disaster, not many Varleys drowned" - poor Grandmother joined us in 1901 from posh Scottish stock - she barely gets a mention!)

makko
24th September 2012, 20:44
Hi Varley,
Yes, there were a lot of expats involved in mining, cement, oil and other heavy industries to bolster the experience. I posted on a pic in the gallery regarding the Cornish mine workers brought in to Pachuca and the fact that the league football team is one of the oldest association football clubs in the world (Pachuca "Tuzos" or "moles"!).
With the new mining technologies, there has been a resurgence in expats in specialized jobs. I think many people would be surprised to find where their forebears got too!
Rgds.
Dave

Pat Kennedy
24th September 2012, 20:57
This was posted elsewhere in error so I`ll try again.
How did a Chief Steward obtain access to a deck store to nick a mooring rope and how long did it take this superhuman to carry it ashore with no-one noticing?I suspect as well as his other shortcomings terminal bullshitting may well be added.

Quite (file://\\quite) simply he organised the lowering of the mooring rope from
the poop to a waiting boat in the dead of night with assistance from his accomplices.
Our Dicky, was no superman, but he was crafty and resourceful.
There are members of SN who sailed with him and can testify to his larcenous instincts, and his charm, he could talk the knickers off a nun!
Pat(Smoke)

MARINEJOCKY
24th September 2012, 21:10
Do nuns wear nickers in Liverpool ?

Old Janner
25th September 2012, 07:15
Do nuns wear nickers in Liverpool ?

How do you know ?

OJ

MARINEJOCKY
25th September 2012, 13:31
Pat K. is the expert or so it seems, on that subject so ask him LOL

Pat Kennedy
25th September 2012, 18:32
Pat K. is the expert or so it seems, on that subject so ask him LOL
My knowledge of nun's undergarments is non existent.
Having been taught by nuns in infant school, I learned quickly to fear them and avoid them where possible.
Those I knew were shrouded from head to foot in black gowns which exposed their face and hands only.
The possibility of underwear never entered my mind, and even now many years later the thought gives me the heebie jeebies.
The expression to charm the knickers off a nun is an old scouse saying, but I doubt if anyone ever did it, or would want to.
Pat(EEK)

makko
25th September 2012, 21:27
Do nuns wear nickers in Liverpool ?
I have done some research during my lunch hour.

I would say, based on my scientific trending methods, that it is 50/50 commando or knickers and depends on the religious order.

Let's get lives!
Rgds.
Dave

tom roberts
26th September 2012, 11:23
This is madness ,how did we get from chief stewards to nuns knickers?,only on a seamans web could this happen.

TonyAllen
26th September 2012, 12:01
This is madness ,how did we get from chief stewards to nuns knickers?,only on a seamans web could this happen.

And that my friends is what makes the site unique to seafarers,imagine haveing this conversation sitting on a hatch on a balmy night middle of the ocean bottle of beer in hand roll up in tother who's going to believe you when you got home Tony

guinnessmick
26th September 2012, 14:27
thats very true, but on todays ships you cannot do that no hatches to sit on lol

makko
26th September 2012, 14:34
Aye! A balmy night, a gentle roll and a cold beer are all that are needed to put the world right!
Rgds.
Dave

alan ward
27th September 2012, 11:13
There ought to be a `like`button on here

alan ward
27th September 2012, 11:14
#79 Who cares Mick?I wouldn`t thank you for a seagoing job these days,we had the best and the last of it.

guinnessmick
27th September 2012, 16:20
thats very true too, but i do miss it lots

alan ward
2nd October 2012, 10:42
Hands up anyone on here who has ever been told`You should write a book`the only problem is that no one would believe you.
Having the Chrysantema accomodation carpeted overnight in Hong Kong the carpet fitters lifted up an unconscious AB laid the carpet and put him back!God only knows what he thought when he woke up.

jg grant
3rd October 2012, 10:08
I might be digressing but talking of things that maybe shore people would not believe. I lived on Norfolk island for nearly two years, that's South Pacific and second home of the descendants of the Bounty mutineers. One of these descendants was troubled by a mouse that used to run across his kitchen floor from under the fridge. One drunken night he sat on a chair with a shotgun and when Mickey appeared he let go both barrels. Shot the motor out of his fridge and MM scuttled away. To stay on topic, I sailed with AB,s who weren't, EDH,s who weren't, skippers and C/E's who could not find their cabin door because they were saturated in p I S S for weeks. So lay off the chief steward guys and anyway , we're all the Big guys bairns.

Varley
3rd October 2012, 10:29
From the IoM viewpoint I must correct you. Norfolk Island may be the third refuge but certainly not the second (Cheese, Mr. Christian?... I thought you liked cheese).

Cisco
3rd October 2012, 10:39
I have it on the best authority that nuns wore canvas knickers

China hand
3rd October 2012, 18:38
No.5 duck?

jg grant
4th October 2012, 03:35
Hi Varley, could I claim technical accuracy on this point? England would certainly have been their first home but as mutineers as I described them, Norfolk was their second home. Did I get off with that one? V - did you ever meet or know Bill Blacklie, ex Musselburgh but married to a IoM girl and skippered a fishing boat out of there? Regards Ronnie.

trotterdotpom
4th October 2012, 09:42
Maybe Varley is referring to Fletcher Christian's Manx family origins. I don'tknow if he ever lived in the IoM or not, but he was born in Cockermouth, Cumberland.

Regardless of that, none of the Mutineers went to Norfolk, just their descendents. Therefore JG is correct - Pitcairn 1, Norfolk 2.

At least nobody blames the Chiefy Steward for the mutiny.

John T

Varley
4th October 2012, 10:37
Maybe Varley is referring to Fletcher Christian's Manx family origins. I don'tknow if he ever lived in the IoM or not, but he was born in Cockermouth, Cumberland.

Regardless of that, none of the Mutineers went to Norfolk, just their descendents. Therefore JG is correct - Pitcairn 1, Norfolk 2.

At least nobody blames the Chiefy Steward for the mutiny.

John T

True, John. Some of his childhood was spent here and his 'line' was Manks (as it would have been put then) and one with mutiny in the blood at that.

I thought to excuse myself with the majority being a British mix but it looks as if most were English.

For decendents conceived after the mutiny then First = Tahiti or Pitcairn. Perhaps Norfolk second. There would probably have been just as many descendents of those who were to become mutineers with England first, perhaps elsewhere later.

As to the Grocer. Remember the cheese (in the film anyway).

David V

trotterdotpom
4th October 2012, 12:37
All of the mutineers were long dead by the time the Pitcairn Islanders went to Norfolk Island. I forgot about the Tahitian women who were taken to Pitcairn, maybe some of them ended up on Norfolk, so that would make three islands for them - but they would have been pretty old as the mutiny was in 1790 and the Norfolk transfer was in 1856. I've got a workmate who is a descendant and I'll ask him. About a third of the Pitcairners returned to Pitcairn eventually and lived happily ever after until someone squealed and they all got locked up a few years back.

Anyone who gets a chance to go to Norfolk Island should grab it - you'll love the place.

Saw a couple of the Bounty films and they were both rubbish - can't recall the cheese incident.

John T

John Callon
4th October 2012, 21:50
Am I right in thinking that Captain Bligh was married on the Isle of Man - in Onchan Church I think.
Regards
John

trotterdotpom
4th October 2012, 22:45
Mr Google says you're correct, but he was Cornish.

John T

GeeM
5th October 2012, 02:16
I remember as first Trip Eng Cadet on the Saltersgate owned by Turnbull Scott back In 1981, the Ch Steward was JJ (Doctor Death) Jackson. He was a skinny wisp of a man and all of 5ft nothing. His cooking was probably the worst I ever had at sea and when I arrived he was just recovering from a good bollocking from the Capt when he discovered that JJ was mixing up pounds weight and kilograms In his ordering and so was ordering huge amounts of some things and not enough of others.

I will never forget going In the galley one night , switching on the light and seeing hundreds of cockroaches skittering away. He had a wife that had picked up In a Bangkok bar that he supported from afar.

makko
5th October 2012, 02:34
I cannot remember the Mate's name nor the ship I was on, but he was a 1/M in BF, from IoM and was indeed a relation of Fletcher Christian.
Wasn't the cheese incident in the Caine Mutiny? Can't remember that even!
Regards,
"Forgetful" Dave

trotterdotpom
5th October 2012, 05:58
You rung a bell - Capt. Queeg threw a wobbler about some strawberries being knocked off - they reminded him of a similar occurrence on another ship when some cheese was swiped.

Captain Bligh proved innocent again.

John T

PS Anna Bligh, the recently deposed Premier of Queensland, was descended from William Bligh. Small world. Her replacement is descended from Donald Duck (I think).

oldman 80
5th October 2012, 09:23
PS Anna Bligh, the recently deposed Premier of Queensland, was descended from William Bligh. Small world. Her replacement is descended from Donald Duck (I think).

Err - excuse me.
"Donald Duck" - would you be referring to Captain CAN DO by any chance ?
(egg)

jg grant
5th October 2012, 09:33
Yes TDP #92 and others . There were Tahitian women taken to Pitcairn and their descendants are still on Norfolk. To this day the locals speak with a Cornish (?) accent mingled with Tahitian. I suspect it is done mainly in the presence of loopys or tourists in a kind of underhand way to either confuse or impress them with their culture.. The only phrase that comes to mind at the moment is,'what a way y'orly,' or how are you today. I have to say that living there for nearly two years they are either SDA's or alchies. There was a murder there a few years ago , a waitress from OZ and everyone, knew who had actually done it, the island 5x3 miles but no one spoke up. The chef guy who got the blame has recently been released but no one else is implicated. It is a drop dead, gorgeous, beautiful island but the locals are a product of their environment. I was not aware of any connection to IoM

jg grant
5th October 2012, 09:37
Hell's teeth! there's a place in England called Cockermouth!!

trotterdotpom
5th October 2012, 12:25
Err - excuse me.
"Donald Duck" - would you be referring to Captain CAN DO by any chance ?
(egg)

Yep, you got that right ... quack quack.

John T

Malky Glaister
5th October 2012, 12:42
Cockermouth, sure is a town. Floods a bit.

What about Charlie Stephens. A member here and truly one of the best, bagpipes and all!

regards

Malky

trotterdotpom
5th October 2012, 12:43
Hell's teeth! there's a place in England called Cockermouth!!

Yep, blow me down, it be there, me hearty!

I knew about the Tahitian birds going to Pitcairn, some of them not willingly, but, as I said, I don't know if any of the originals ever ended up on Norfolk - they would have been pretty ancient if they did.

Your comments about the murder are interesting - I didn't know that bloke had been released.

It must be quite distressing for Varley to hear that the local yokels on Norfolk don't talk like the Beegees (blown away Scousers from the IoM via Redcliffe, Queensland).

When I visited Norfolk, yonks ago, I had an "in" with the local cop who was from Canberra and had some good yarns to tell, but it is, as you say, a breathtakingly beautiful island. What's an SDA?

Apart from all that, some of my best friends were Chief Stewards.

John T

alan ward
5th October 2012, 15:10
#100 There sure is and it causes lots of amusement when tourists ask the `bus drivers`Are you going to Cockermouth?`local people are always amused when they hear that,try it and see for yourself.

muldonaich
5th October 2012, 17:06
Cockermouth, sure is a town. Floods a bit.

What about Charlie Stephens. A member here and truly one of the best, bagpipes and all!

regards

Malkycharlie was a great chief steward and a gentleman malky a good man to sail with.

jg grant
5th October 2012, 20:50
Hi TDP #103. Yes the cops all came from ACT, for some obscure reason. Don't know if any of the originals reached Norfolk from Pitcairn but the island is still home to lots of Quintals, Adams, Buffets and Christians, all looking pretty much like one another. I believe it is the only place in the world where the telephone book prints nicknames in place of given names. S.D.A.'s are seventh day adventists. The graveyard is a spooky place, lots of murders, hangings and drownings.

Nigel Wing
8th January 2013, 16:21
Going back to Ch Stewards, good and bad, John Jones (Welshman) has my vote as the top Ch Steward I have sailed with, the rest of the catering staff on this vessel were Indonesian, but John would be in the galley everyday, organising, and the food was superb.

When the feeding rate per man had to be adhered to, (Captains orders), John set up the lunchtime self choice menu's, hence no waste and very popular, he also managed to stock up so the occasional barbeque could be enjoyed when deep sea.

Others who were less imaginative just cut down on the food, one was nicknamed Eggy ------ as his first move was to restrict everyone to one egg only for breakfast etc.

Most of my time at sea was with Asian catering staff, who on the whole did quite well, all the same I enjoyed sailing with the British characters with the latter company.

Nigel.

slick
8th January 2013, 17:46
All,
Many a Chief Steward's reputation has been saved by putting Treacle Duff on twice in the last week before pay-off UK.

Yours aye,

slick

jmbrent
8th January 2013, 19:55
Mobil in the sixties had Indian butlers in charge of catering, they were Goanese and when the food started to go down hill the Company would send 1 of the 2 Chief Stewards that they had to sort it out, and all they did was have a good jolly and NO improvement in the quality of the food.

garry Norton
9th January 2013, 00:40
World Cliff, $3 a day ,$1 for food, #2 for Ch Stwds pocket.
Strath Angus Ch Stwd feed everyone well as each crew member could choose the menu on rotation and the feeding rate meet company's allowance.
Did the company's auditors do their job.

Ben Boat Jim
10th March 2013, 09:40
I came off a Ben boat in late '57 and after being well fed for over a year I had the misfortune to join the British Bulldog a B.T C. tanker
Talk about a culinary shock. She was on The "Board of Trade whack" which upheld the Board of Trade Articles dated 1893 ( date may be out a little ).
Each man got issued with a knife fork spoon and mug, a tin of condensed milk,
Dry tea and sugar were scrupulously measured out on scales, the Chief Steward adding or deleting every grain , What a hungry b@%@#d, no wonder they got the name....."belly Robbing b------s
but in all fairness I did sail with some good ones

Binnacle
19th March 2013, 12:22
Talk about a culinary shock. She was on The "Board of Trade whack" which upheld the Board of Trade Articles dated 1893 ( date may be out a little ).
Each man got issued with a knife fork spoon and mug, a tin of condensed milk,
Dry tea and sugar were scrupulously measured out on scales, the Chief Steward adding or deleting every grain , What a hungry b@%@#d, no wonder they got the name....."belly Robbing b------s
but in all fairness I did sail with some good ones

Snap

I had the misfortune to sail on the British Dragoon 1946/47, similar conditions. Tin mug and tin plates. Two pot ship (Eat). Ten months misery.(BTC = better times coming) I don't think the steward or OM (Capt Bumstead*) were dishonest, just a case of all things bright and beautiful.
"The rich man in his castle
the poor man at his gate.
The Lord above has so decreed
each to his own estate."

* the elephant never forgets

Happy times

john palmer
19th March 2013, 12:54
Speaking of Treacle Duff, (as Slick was), I recall being 2nd Steward on the NZSCo. HINAKURA where, for some unknown reason the galley boy had left a very large - and still sealed - tin of Tate and Lyle Golden Syrup on the galley stove , which was still turned on. I still remember the sound of the explosion, and how fortunate it was that not a single crew member was in the galley, or close proximity, when the can exploded and that no-one was injured. The Galley Boy, however, was later awoken from his afternoon kip , and started what was probably the biggest sugi job of his life ! It was hours before he finished but in the meantime it really was quite nice to amble through the Galley and surrounding areas, and actually be able to run a finger up or down any bulkhead and get a lovely taste of treacle. AAAAaaaa such memories. And I bet that Galley Boy is still scoring pints in the pub on that story !

Fred Field
29th March 2013, 20:19
If I remember rightly in the 50's60's the victualing rate was seven shillings per man per day.If the Chief Steward kept that rate down he was classed as a "Good" Chief Steward by the Company,a good "Belly Robber!!"
Do we have any "Bowaters" men who can confirm that the food on the "Bowaters" ships was second to none.A selection of Fruit Juice and cereals for breakfast,not just for the Saloon but for the crew mess.
I was told by a few guys I sailed with that the rate in "Bowaters" was a couple of shillings per day more than the average shipping companys.
One guy told me a Chief Steward doing his first trip with "Bowaters" could'nt wait to tell the Catering Super how he had brought the rate down.
The Catering Super said "The stores are put on the ship to feed the crew well your fired!!!"
Regards,
Jim B.

I do not know about when Bowaters was run by Bowaters but I was on the Nina and Phyllis '71-'72 (2/E) when it was under B&C management and there were several little differences between those ships and the rest of the B&C fleet.
When I was on the Phyllis the PCO was a Dominic Fletcher-Croucher (forgive the spelling), a great guy, he had, I understand been with 'Bowaters' before B&C took over the management. His 'feeding' was excellent! Once we left port lunch used to be 'a la carte' you just had to order it before the end of the previous workday, or you would get an omlette with a few veggies, and that was for everyone. As Dominic used to say, 'virtually no waste, I save a small fortune'. Want tab-nabs for a party no problem just ask.

Fred Field
29th March 2013, 20:38
This is madness ,how did we get from chief stewards to nuns knickers?,only on a seamans web could this happen.

Dare I say it, my dearly beloved spent 13 years in a Religious Order (Nun) and introduced me to an expression that I had not heard before 'As much use as the t*t* on a nun'. Previously I had used 'bull' instead of 'nun'.

Our son claims to have won (bets) many beers whilst 'working out West' in the Canadian oilfields by stating that his mother was a Nun, and then getting even more when he adds 'and Dad was a sailor'. How the hell he proves it I have no idea.

Fred Field
29th March 2013, 20:45
Hell's teeth! there's a place in England called Cockermouth!!

There is a place In Newfoundland called Dildo.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XIWoiUALFwU

alex page
30th March 2013, 03:45
My vote for best ch/Std goes to George Ford of the NZSCo latest films and great food
Alex

alan ward
30th March 2013, 12:40
Bowaters rate would have been good,spending the time they did up on the Lakes.US Ag and Fish used to seal our fridges and apart for stuff required to make the immediate meals we had to buy locally and what good quality it was,the fruit and veg was fresher than any we ever saw in the UK and,of course,there was an allowance for the difference in the prices as the USA was generally more expensive than the tired old s**te that some of the companies,you know who you are Sugar Line with your .60 per day rate in 1972,palmed off on us.
Bowaters reputation was rightfully good and anyone worth their salt would do their very best to keep things varied and interesting,if so many Chief Stewards were as poor as some of the `experts`of here would have you believe how did they keep their jobs and their lives?Those of you who served during the war and immediate postwar periods were better fed than most ashore.My father served from 42-47 and I trust his opinions a damn sight more than a lot on here and apart from disliking the chinese cookery on a Booth boat he spoke highly of the food he was presented with and as a Port Health officer on the Thames during the 50`s made sure that whenever possible he got fed on board whichever vessel he was inspecting.

Fred Field
30th March 2013, 13:30
US Ag and Fish used to seal our fridges and apart for stuff required to make the immediate meals we had to buy locally and what good quality it was,the fruit and veg was fresher than any we ever saw in the UK and,of course,there was an allowance for the difference in the prices as the USA was generally more expensive than the tired old s**te that some of the companies,you know who you are Sugar Line with your .60 per day rate in 1972,palmed off on us.


I had forgotten that bit until you reminded me.
Thanks

oldseamerchant
30th March 2013, 14:42
Sailed for several Hong Kong/PRC owners in the late 70s early 80s whose feeding allowance did not include the Catering staff who had to exist on the inevitable lesser portions served to the rest of the crew. Seemed to work OK unless you asked for extra which new Masters/Chengs were prone to do.The Stwds had a very subtle way of dealing with that request. The Chinese Officers/ratings were well versed in the system and knew better than to even ask.

alan ward
30th March 2013, 16:48
I think we ought to start a new thread Engineers/Deck Officers Good or Bad and see what transpires.Always bear this in mind chaps,those of us in the catering Department were at sea earning our living away from friends and family whilst most of you were making tea in a shipyard on the Clyde or picking your spots in Warsash.I met some very strange Chief Stewards/Pursers/Catering officers but far more odd were the professional 3rd`s,dispensation 2nd`s who were never going to get a ticket or a Rentamate sailing 3rd.Officer at 64 with a WW2 2nd.Mates ticket and a crippling,aggressive, anti-social drink habit.Every department had its oddballs and hopeless drunks one Senior Electrician couldn`t wait to get his mail because his mum used to end him a synopsis of every episode of Coronation Street,the t****r! I believe you were better fed and looked after at sea than at any other time of your life,as a matter of interest how many of you get three cooked meals a day now?

trotterdotpom
30th March 2013, 21:40
Sailed for several Hong Kong/PRC owners in the late 70s early 80s whose feeding allowance did not include the Catering staff who had to exist on the inevitable lesser portions served to the rest of the crew. Seemed to work OK unless you asked for extra which new Masters/Chengs were prone to do.The Stwds had a very subtle way of dealing with that request. The Chinese Officers/ratings were well versed in the system and knew better than to even ask.

Can you enlighten us?

John T

Binnacle
30th March 2013, 22:50
[QUOTE=alan ward;667015]I think we ought to start a new thread Engineers/Deck Officers Good or Bad and see what transpires.

but far more odd were the professional 3rd`s,dispensation 2nd`s who were never going to get a ticket or a Rentamate sailing 3rd.Officer at 64 with a WW2 2nd.Mate's ticket and a crippling,aggressive, anti-social drink habit.


It appears that you are of the opinion that a seaman who sat for and obtained a second mate's ticket during the war is a lesser mortal ?

jmcg
30th March 2013, 23:23
Sailed for several Hong Kong/PRC owners in the late 70s early 80s whose feeding allowance did not include the Catering staff who had to exist on the inevitable lesser portions served to the rest of the crew. Seemed to work OK unless you asked for extra which new Masters/Chengs were prone to do.The Stwds had a very subtle way of dealing with that request. The Chinese Officers/ratings were well versed in the system and knew better than to even ask.

Help us out Bill by allowing us details of these "owners" and how the stewards dealt with the request for the "extras" you referred to.


.J

alan ward
31st March 2013, 10:07
#123
Far from it Binnacle,I am well aware of the circumstances under which a war time certifcate was won,I was remarking on the fact that having passed 2nd.Mates in 1944/45 he had made no moves to further his qualifications and he may be a little unused in 1975 to a brand new modern refrigerated cargo vessel after some 25 years ashore.Maybe that`s why he drank so much.

jg grant
31st March 2013, 10:28
Well said Alan Ward #121. I have always found that many ,once at sea becomes a gourmet after coming from nothing in a shipyard or carrying lunch ,(except it was never called lunch), in a tin or satchel. Nobody would look past the fact that the C/S had financial constraints imposed by the company and maybe a skipper intent on lining his own pockets. Think on lads before you pick on the catering staff,

alan ward
31st March 2013, 11:15
#126
That`s something I hadn`t thought of for years skippers who thought they were Captain Bligh,one who shall remain nameless used to view a weeks menus in advance and go through them with a pen altering as he saw fit.This is the man who decreed that despite the companies menu book recommendations the complement could only have salad as an option for one meal a day and the same for cheese the abuse I got for that.The fridges were working at higher than usual temperatures this caused mould to appear on the butter,when I reported this to himhe told me to trim it off!I pointed that the taste would linger he asked if we should dump it or could I use it for anything else.I said I could use some for frying and a bit more for baking but overall it was scrap.We replenished in Canada,same for the long life milk incidentally,at the end of the voyage he put a redline through my Victualling Book claim for this wastage and said`You used it for other purposes`so it stands.That man scuppered me at every turn and I left that ship no job to go to,no money because they paid so little and a great sense of relief.That was 40 years ago and for years I dreamed of meeting that OM somewhere dark and alone.

jg grant
1st April 2013, 08:43
Hi Al, that reminds me, you shall have three eggs per man per week, perhaps. Twisted BOT rules. Regards Ronnie

alan ward
1st April 2013, 10:10
I`d have given you as many eggs as you wanted Ronnie,even if I had to lay them myself.

ben27
2nd April 2013, 01:45
good morning alan ward,31,march.2013,01:48.re: chief steward good and bad.i think you covered the subject very well.i also agree with jg grant.march31th.19:28.(126)quote.once they go to sea they become a gourmet.they never got three meals a day before they went to sea,and I doubt if they got them when they went back ashore.as for chief stewards.they were like anybody else,they differed as chalk and cheese.as with anybody else.you can pick your friends.but not your chief steward,he is your shipmate,like it or not,one day you may need him in an emergency,i hope not.have a good day.ask your chief how hes feeling.you may get the xtra egg, have a good one ben27

alan ward
3rd April 2013, 10:02
Something about our role in the running of a vessel seems to have been overlooked the food,although extremely important,was only one of many tasks we undertook as part of our duties.Apart from all aspects of port entry from dealing with Customs(bond,bunker and personal declarations),Port Health,Immigration and cash advances we also treated you for the multitude of personal health issues you presented us with.I have seen more diseased penis` than a Port Said hooker!usually just after we`ve sailed and a long sea passage ahead before the next port,NSU`s treated with daily injections of penicillin sometimes with a queue of crew members awaiting their turn try doing that with a hangover!A Junior Engineer arrived one morning luckily as we arrived off the Thames with a knob that looked like a sausage someone had stamped on a result of a night of passion in Nagoya that lad had worried about that for weeks,he was sent ashore treatment and didn`t come back!He had to treat you with compassion,care and sympathy never letting on that we didn`t truly understand what you really had picked up.I was taught suturing by watching a PCO called Alan Moreton as he fixed the wounds of a Bangali called Jan E Alam,there is only way to learn how to do it and that`s do it.I was s***ing myself the first time I stitched someone but couldn`t let him see that he was already frightened and in pain.I had to pretend I knew what I was doing and had done it loads of times.Later I could do it my sleep, I still wasn`t any good but thought I was.

notnila
3rd April 2013, 20:40
Alan,I was helping to clean out Fridges ,I reached into a corner to pick up a Corned Beef tin,not noticing that it was already opened and cut my hand fairly deep.Wrapped a T-shirt round it and went to the C/S for first aid.
After removing the T-shirt I was still bleeding like a stuck pig,he shouted for the Pantry boy to bring a chair and the A/S to fetch a glass of water,when they arrived he sat on the chair,drunk the water,then put his head between his knees so that he wouldn't be sick! 2nd Mate done the business! I still have the scar!!!

alan ward
4th April 2013, 10:58
Notnila#132
Once during storing an A/S slid a carton of HP sauce bottles down his leg not noticing that a broken bottle was sticking out and it sliced his knee very neatly.
I got him into my office and prepared the sutures and drsssings as i started to work on it,he needed about 5,the C/O Paul Rugg entered and watching me for a while asked`Can I have a go?`the poor young A/S shouted`Don`t let him Chief,please don`t let him`
Perhaps my most worrying story about first aid came from the Sugar Crystal,we had Yemeni arabs in the engine room and one came to me with a crushed thumb;now this digit was the size of cucumber and looked as he`d caught in acutally in something it wasn`t broken but crushed and spilt the cut was dirty and ragged I cleaned of the grease,oil and sh**e that was on on and bandaged it tightly,changed it once or twice and then we paid off.I often worried about him because it was such a mess and I didn`t think I`d done that good a job on it.About a year or so later I joined the Labrador Clipper in Panama and on doing my first walk round,I went down to the crew mess and heard someone shout looking up I saw my damaged Arab luckily with a big grin on his face holding a large,scarred but still intact thumb.Thank God,Inshallah or whatever.We had little or no training at all and at times it was quite disturbing.

WilliamH
4th April 2013, 11:51
On a lighter note, why do Chief Stewards go to church? - To pray that the engineers will go on hunger strike.

alan ward
4th April 2013, 12:03
I knew on which side my bread was buttered always make sure the engineers have enough tea,coffee,marmite/bovril,sugar and milk for control room drinks.Also ensure that the pantry fridges had adequate supplies for the evenings as often when drinking I would be sent to make curries with the cold meat or if on the meat runs,steak sandwiches in the duty mess.That way you would ensure that an engineer would help you immediately if your fridges had a problem or you needed help with something mechanical in the galley,quid pro quo as we say in Liverpool.

jg grant
7th April 2013, 11:05
William H #134
and also pray that they would take their effin boots off that side of the engine room door and not touch the bulkheads with hands or overalls!

alan ward
9th April 2013, 10:56
In 10 years only had problems with one Jnr.Engineer who on a maiden voyage used to go to his cabin in working gear including boots and wrote his carpet off in 5 months and an ERS who went nuts with drink and kept his p**s in buckets tastefully arranged round his cabin.Apart from those two I found Engineers universally clean!

makko
9th April 2013, 15:03
In 10 years only had problems with one Jnr.Engineer who on a maiden voyage used to go to his cabin in working gear including boots and wrote his carpet off in 5 months

I took over on Barber Priam from a filthy basket - The cabin was disgusting and he even left me some boiler suits, THANKS a LOT!. Luckily, old Motorbike Griffiths had a carpet shampooer onboard. I spent the first week cleaning every inch of my cabin and carpet. We always took our boots off before exiting the ER and had a mat to leave them on outside the bar - We were only allowed to grab a beer out of the fridge, not enter in our boiler suits.

Rgds.
Dave

Burned Toast
9th April 2013, 15:28
I took over on Barber Priam from a filthy basket - The cabin was disgusting and he even left me some boiler suits, THANKS a LOT!. Luckily, old Motorbike Griffiths had a carpet shampooer onboard. I spent the first week cleaning every inch of my cabin and carpet. We always took our boots off before exiting the ER and had a mat to leave them on outside the bar - We were only allowed to grab a beer out of the fridge, not enter in our boiler suits.

Rgds.
Dave

Cannot recall the engineers being any more messy than other depts(Bounce)

Ray(Pint)

Riptide
13th April 2013, 16:25
Cannot recall the engineers being any more messy than other depts(Bounce)

Ray(Pint)

Thank you Ray for that vote it is much appreciated.I can say that we all ate well when I Sailed with you & Ray the 2nd cooks Bread was 2nd to none.Kenny.P.S.hope to see you & Pat at the next meet up.(Applause)

Pat Kennedy
13th April 2013, 19:57
I took over on Barber Priam from a filthy basket - The cabin was disgusting and he even left me some boiler suits, THANKS a LOT!. Luckily, old Motorbike Griffiths had a carpet shampooer onboard. I spent the first week cleaning every inch of my cabin and carpet. We always took our boots off before exiting the ER and had a mat to leave them on outside the bar - We were only allowed to grab a beer out of the fridge, not enter in our boiler suits.

Rgds.
Dave

Motorbike Griffiths attended to me when I had a bad fall on the focsle on a Bluey leaving drydock in Hamburg.
He was very professional and tended to me very well until the ship was alongside and the ambulance came. He accompanied me to Das Hafenkrankenhaus and ensured I was OK before returning to the ship. He even sent one of his stewards the next day with a bag containing some oranges and three cans of Tennants. He was a good 'grocer' was Motorbike.
Pat(Thumb)

Alex Salmond
13th April 2013, 21:01
Blue Star had some shockers in the 70s & 80s when i was with them ,big fat Lottie, the Plummer brothers and a few more that were as bad all gay as it happens (not that that matters,just an observation) But Alfie Plummer was involved in one of the funniest things i ever saw at sea ,the engine room mechanic Claude from Trinidad ,nice guy, rejoined the Southland Star in LA and was unwell turns out he caught mumps from one of his 4 kids when on leave after a few days his nuts were swollen to the size of two black oranges ,an awesome sight !, and as the skin was splitting badly gay old Alfie who was also the medical officer had to come down to his cabin twice a day to bathe the offending globes with a special solution,it was hilarious to see him tripping down the alleyway with his wee tight shorts ,towel over one arm ,bowl of solution in the other hand humming a merry tune ,poor old Claude was mortified and wanted to do it himself but Alfie was having none of that ,this went on for weeks and poor old Claude ended up sterile but after 4 kids he didnt mind ,he was just happy when the batheing ordeal was over

kevjacko
20th April 2013, 13:28
#126
That`s something I hadn`t thought of for years skippers who thought they were Captain Bligh,one who shall remain nameless used to view a weeks menus in advance and go through them with a pen altering as he saw fit.This is the man who decreed that despite the companies menu book recommendations the complement could only have salad as an option for one meal a day and the same for cheese the abuse I got for that.The fridges were working at higher than usual temperatures this caused mould to appear on the butter,when I reported this to himhe told me to trim it off!I pointed that the taste would linger he asked if we should dump it or could I use it for anything else.I said I could use some for frying and a bit more for baking but overall it was scrap.We replenished in Canada,same for the long life milk incidentally,at the end of the voyage he put a redline through my Victualling Book claim for this wastage and said`You used it for other purposes`so it stands.That man scuppered me at every turn and I left that ship no job to go to,no money because they paid so little and a great sense of relief.That was 40 years ago and for years I dreamed of meeting that OM somewhere dark and alone.


I sailed with a similar skipper on a Rowbothams ship. They had recently been taken under IOM agency and I was the first non Rowbotham staff they'd clapped eyes on, talk mabout being treat like a bad smell.
First skipper from Jarrow (name escapes me) was spot on, then the permanent skipper arrived. He like to go ashore to the cash and carry himself. He came back with arms full of crap. Including the bright idea of individual cartons of milk those little plastic pots which he said would reduce waste. Yes they would have had they been in date and he'd bought about 5000 of the stupid things. That was just for starters.......

trotterdotpom
20th April 2013, 14:12
I sailed with a similar skipper on a Rowbothams ship. They had recently been taken under IOM agency and I was the first non Rowbotham staff they'd clapped eyes on, talk mabout being treat like a bad smell.
First skipper from Jarrow (name escapes me) was spot on, then the permanent skipper arrived. He like to go ashore to the cash and carry himself. He came back with arms full of crap. Including the bright idea of individual cartons of milk those little plastic pots which he said would reduce waste. Yes they would have had they been in date and he'd bought about 5000 of the stupid things. That was just for starters.......

That may have been the milk left over from Maggie's ban on school milk.

John T

John Briggs
20th April 2013, 18:59
Was Master on a ship with all Indonesian crew when the Chief Steward asked me if I would like to try buffalo steaks.
I said sure so the next day for lunch, buffalo steak was on the menu.
It was delicious and all the non Indonesian officers liked it also.
I told one very happy Chief Steward that it could become a regular on the menu.

Gordon Turnbull
29th April 2013, 16:58
Well I was everything in Catering from Bell Boy on Union Castle to Superintendent. Obviously spent a fair while as Chief Steward. Reference the BP posts, you are absolutely correct BP had a horrific name up until early to mid 70s when a new Superintendent was appointed and I can honestly say the menus on BP tankers became as good as any I have ever seen anywhere. Bad Chief Stewards? Sailed with a few. Fell out with a few over many things, settled the differences, moved on. Personally think I was the best ever. :-) At least I never heard anyone complain.

ben27
30th April 2013, 02:22
good day Gordon turnbull,today,01:58.re:chief stewards good and bad,i have posted on this thread before,but reading the post"s today I read your post(146) in which you say.quote. personally think I was the best ever,i admire your self confidence,after reading some of the post"s it was refreshing to know there are some chief's who care about there self esteem.have a good day.best ever.ben27

Gordon Turnbull
30th April 2013, 06:38
good day Gordon turnbull,today,01:58.re:chief stewards good and bad,i have posted on this thread before,but reading the post"s today I read your post(146) in which you say.quote. personally think I was the best ever,i admire your self confidence,after reading some of the post"s it was refreshing to know there are some chief's who care about there self esteem.have a good day.best ever.ben27

You do realise it was tongue in cheek? (Hippy)

guinnessmick
30th April 2013, 08:54
seaman never complained to those that mattered just among themselves and it was always the galley staff that got it in the neck