Best before & sell by date

ray bloomfield
7th December 2009, 22:59
This has probably been raised before but how are these dates obtained.
Foe example I have just opened a pack of mature stilton with a best before date of 10th August '09. Well matured but delicious!
Like cheese wine matures with age, unlike my wife who ages like Milk!!
(honest love, only joking)

Thats another Story
7th December 2009, 23:08
Spring Water Takes Hudreds Of Years To Filter Down Through Lime Stone Sand And All Other Filtering Agents ?!!! Then They Put A Sell By Date On It? Daft Or What!!!!!!!!!![=P]

Thats another Story
7th December 2009, 23:10
Pity They Did Not Put Them On Wifes(Jester)

John Dryden
7th December 2009, 23:15
My old man used to get this really dodgy cheese from his mate who worked in Poland,god knows how old it was by the time he got it,I couldn,t stomach it and I love Stilton and Gorganzola but he ate it without any ill effects.

spongebob
8th December 2009, 00:36
In Australia most bottled beers are marked with a "use by" date but a hand crafted natural brew called "Coopers" carries the label "Best after" such and such a date. What does that tell you?
I have a four pack of Guinness cans that are marked "Best Before 7/7/08" Dare I drink them!

Bob

ray bloomfield
8th December 2009, 00:49
I once found a small Goblin steak pudding in a tin which could be truthfully dated as over eleven years old, after a bit of thought I steamed it as instructed and it was lovely same as the bag of sugared almonds I found outside in the shed after three years, super (not steamed though) and the 48 pints of home made lager abandoned in the coal shed for 18mths, alcohol content on testing and before drinking 13.8%. But carefully opened.

CLIVE R786860
8th December 2009, 02:38
Istill have abottle of lifeboat sweets that i got of a ship in 1974,Ihad one last year ,bit soft but still ok,has anyone got anything of this ilk?

Keltic Star
8th December 2009, 05:23
Pity They Did Not Put Them On Wifes(Jester)

Careful John, for safety's sake, shouldn't that be ex-wives? I've got a couple and I think they were out of date before I married them.

Billieboy
8th December 2009, 06:49
The missus hit a super bargain at one of our supermarkets about ten years ago, it seems that all the wine and champers was past sell by date, She came home with forty bottles of champagne, (real, not contraband copies) at five guilders a throw, reduced from thirty guilders. The last three went last Christmas. She also collected six cases of a beautiful Sancere for two chips a bottle, we still have a few bottles; last birthday at a nearby restaurant we saw the same sancere priced at €39,50 a bottle!

Isn't life great when one can live on the Past sell by Date gear!

tsell
8th December 2009, 07:25
In Australia most bottled beers are marked with a "use by" date but a hand crafted natural brew called "Coopers" carries the label "Best after" such and such a date. What does that tell you?
I have a four pack of Guinness cans that are marked "Best Before 7/7/08" Dare I drink them!

Bob

Bob

Under no circumstances should you attempt to drink Guinness which is 'out of date' as it could have serious consequences for your health.
I recently saved a mate's life by disposing of his old Guinness, so I am happy to do the same for you in the same manner.
If you send me a PM I'll give you my address so that you can rush it to me for disposal before temptation gets the better of you!!

Good Health

Taff

spongebob
8th December 2009, 08:13
Billiboy, isn't that where most of us older gentlemen live. In the past and well and truly beyond the used by date.
We are designed for the more matured fruits of living and I am sure that that "best before" date on my Guinness is a ploy to make me drink it early and buy more.
Taff knows this hence his offer.

Bob

tsell
8th December 2009, 08:43
Bob,hope you don't think I was being devious!!

Taff

Billieboy
8th December 2009, 10:57
Go on Taff I would have thought that you would be more of a Ffellinfoyles, Hancocks or Brains man! I can't stand Guinness outside Ireland, and I haven't been there since '66!

billyboy
8th December 2009, 11:30
I may have reached my "Sell by date" Bob. But, I have not reached my "use by" date yet thank goodness i still get used.......LOL

tsell
8th December 2009, 21:17
Billieboy, my dad was a Brains drinker - wouldn't touch anything else - but as a lad I was introduced to Irish beers by an Irish shipmate and somehow they suited my palette.
These days, I can toddle along the road to the D'Arcy Arms and get my pints of Guinness straight from the barrel.
Mind you I don't drink much these days - I spill most of it!!

Taff

Ian6
8th December 2009, 22:17
Many years ago our daughter (then teen-aged) got a weekend job in the village shop. This establishment was run by a stalwart of the village who happened to be standing there when the shop was built (the shop was thatched and Grade 2 listed by English Heritage). This fine lady, was well read (mainly The Sporting Post) and due to a specialised diet that came in bottles was not as nimble as she had been in the 1890's so used a walking stick. Our daughter was impressed by the owner's ability to fish items off shelves using the crook of her walking stick. Many of the items for sale were unknown to our daughter - the manufacturers having either gone bust or been taken over years ago -. Almost nothing was past its sell by date, hardly anything had one. It would probably have been in Roman numerals any way.
No one seemed any the worse for consuming so much that should really have been in the Victoria & Albert Museum.
Ian

AncientBrit
8th December 2009, 22:26
In 1965, a group of us took out an MFV, from Sembawang Dockyard, complete with a live aboard motor whalla, For a trip up the Jahore River to Kotta Tingi, on the way back we stopped overnight at the jetty of a kampong across the river from Changi. In the evening, we went to the local store run by a Sikh gentleman to see if we could purchase some beverages. While everyone was bargaining for the stuff I noticed some large bottles up on the top of the shelves, completely covered with a thick layer of dust. They had been up there since his father died and he wasnt sure what was in them. Wiped the dust off and they were pint sized screw tops of Guinness that he figured had been there since just after the war. I guess because he figured he was never going to get another group of dummies gullible enough to buy the stuff, he mentioned an untouched case that had sat in the storeroom at back and we could have them for S$1.00 apiece. OMG! The hang-over the following morning was one I wouldnt wish on my worse enemy. But there was no due, or best before date on the bottles and it was like nothing I have ever tasted before or since, Best described as a cross between single malt and cream sherry. Of course, because we wouldnt be able to take it back to the ship, we had to finish it off there and then. Talk about aged. 20 odd undisturbed years of 80's type temperature definately did something good to it.

Billieboy
9th December 2009, 06:30
Mind you I don't drink much these days - I spill most of it!!

I know the feeling Taff, I get it on Match days, both before and after, never during!

tsell
9th December 2009, 09:57
Aboput 40 years ago, while diving off a remote island in the north of New Zealand, my mate and I came across what turned out to be a barnacle encrusted bottle about 40 feet down. It was the only one we found after a long search.

We kept it in my shed amongst other trophies. I had cleaned it up and it was full of liquid and the top was covered in wax.

One evening, knocking off some home brew one of the lads took it down off the shelf and said, "You know we should check this out, it could be drinkable."

Well, being more than a bit 'under the weather' we said, "What the hell" and got a drill and bored out the neck a little way then punched a nail down the rest.

Gradually we dripped some into a glass and it was a beautiful amber liquid. I was elected to be the guinea pig.

So gingerly, I tasted it and announced, "It's bloody whisky!"

Well soon we were all at it and we agreed that not only was it whisky, but it was the best we had ever tasted!

We finished the bottle, no hangovers, but the next day we realised that unopened it could have been worth a mint!

I have always wondered how old it really was and how it came to be there all on it's own as we dived the site many times an found nothing to give us a clue.

PS there was no 'use by' date!!

Taff

NoMoss
9th December 2009, 11:08
Careful John, for safety's sake, shouldn't that be ex-wives? I've got a couple and I think they were out of date before I married them.

That's why they were two for one.

ray bloomfield
9th December 2009, 11:40
Tsell
Just read somewhere that a bottle of Nuns Irish whiskEy has gone up for sale with a price tag of 100,000.
Your bottle must have been very old to have a wax stopper been trying to find out when cork stoppers were first used but no luck so far.
That wee dram you had was probably the most expensive drink you are ever likely to have.

Rgds from Speyside (home of Scotch Whisky)

Thats another Story
9th December 2009, 12:03
i have a bottle of glenfiddich pure single malt at least 32 years old{AND I DON'T DRINK}special reserve is it out of date{ DO I THROW IT OUT}(Jester)

billyboy
9th December 2009, 12:09
Dont worry about it John. Just chuck it in my glass mate...LOL

NoMoss
9th December 2009, 12:21
i have a bottle of glenfiddich pure single malt at least 32 years old{AND I DON'T DRINK}special reserve is it out of date{ DO I THROW IT OUT}(Jester)

I had a flask shaped bottle of Red Label that my dad had been given before the war. It had a little ribbon with a lead seal on it. The price on the label was 6/9, in pencil. My dad didn't drink so it was kept.
I offered it to the Whisky Exchange in London and they are giving 85 for it.
As Whisky doesn't mature after it has been bottled I thought it was worth more to me unopened so I think I was right.

spongebob
9th December 2009, 12:45
Taff, that bottle found off a remote island was probably Hokunui moonshine from the South Island's illicit stills. It's a wonder the glass was able to resist the corrosive effects that long!

Bob

tsell
9th December 2009, 23:02
Bob

The old Hokunui wasn't all that bad a drop - if there was nothing else within 50 miles!
Incidentally, the island was Burgess, in the Mokohinau group. You probably know it well.

Ray

I feel sick!!!

Taff

spongebob
9th December 2009, 23:32
Taff,
I have only sampled whisky that was reputed to be a drop of Hokunui and it was not that bad but who knows what some of these old Dunedin Scots tell you. It was certainly better than Wilsons and 45 South Whisky distilled by Wilsons Malt Extract Co in Dunedin.

Yes I have been around the Mokohinau Group, once on a Navy Frigate that was in the area on trials and received a call from the Island to take of the lighthouse keeper's wife who had an appenticitis.
Quite a day when they had to row the ship's cutter in heavy weather to pick her up in the days before outboard motors, rubber duckies and helicopters.

By the way I have put that Guinness on chill in this 30 plus weather and will sample it in a day or so.
If you don't see any more postings from me, only an obituary, you will know what has happened!

Bob ee

tsell
10th December 2009, 08:43
Bob

I am positive that you will enjoy it. I have found the way to ensure the best flavour is to make sure when the can is opened it's poured at once into a glass which will hold the full contents. Pour down the side smoothly - don't let it bubble as this lets air into it and alters the flavour.
Not trying to tell you how to suck eggs - just Guinness!!
Do not put into Christmas pudding as it's a waste.

Taff

tsell
10th December 2009, 09:14
Ray

You may be able to answer this one for me.

Christmas 1981 I bought a quantity of booze for the crew who were building a house for me. The missus asked me to pick up a bottle of brandy for ourselves.
I saw a bottle of Courvoisier which we enjoy and added it to the rest. The bill came to around $300.

When I got home I checked the bill as I thought it was high. I found I had been charged $90 for the cognac. I rang the manager whom I knew and said I had been overcharged. He said it was right as I had selected the best bottle they had and it was very old and a limited edition. He offered to take it back but said it would appreciate in value if I kept it. So I did.

I still have it, unopened. Since reading this thread I checked the web and can't find it anywhere.

It is a 700ml gold bottle Napoleon Cognac Pour Imperiale Limited Edition (L8554) and a large 'E' in the bottom dimple.

I have always felt that I was ripped off at $90 in 1981 and if so have vowed to open it at my wake and come back to haunt the b*stard that sold it to me!!

Was I conned??

Taff

GWB
10th December 2009, 10:02
Have a bottle of Haig and Haig bottled in Scotland in 1930s given to me pre 2000 by a friend in the states it has gold wire with lead seal and is same shaped bottle as dimple. I was over there recently and tried an other one he had it was just perfect. Might try mine one day.

GWB

ray bloomfield
10th December 2009, 15:21
Tsell
Dont know much about Cognac so cant realy comment, what was the $ worth in relation to in the early 80's. I should thinks its worth more than that now to a collector, try to sell it before drinking though as you could always do that later if not sold while having a good cry over finding out you paid too much for it. Pref before your wake though.
If its any consolation to you (doubt it) in 1981 I bought two 70cl botts. of Royal Salute for 31 each (duty free) from a ship chandler. During one of our many onboard parties (MV Andrea HO2323 482t dwt) someone obviously opened them because all I can remember is seeing the MT bottles later, cant recollect tasting them though
(MAD) :mad:

hughesy
10th December 2009, 15:43
My sister has a docking bottle of brandy I brought my Mum home from 1969, which makes it 40 years old, I told her to crack open when I peg out and give everybody a dram, lets hope thats a few years off, what happens to stuff in a bottle does it get better with age, anyone know????

all the best(Thumb)
Hughesy

ray bloomfield
10th December 2009, 16:20
Its supposed to stay the same because the maturing process is completed in the barrel. As has been stated on a previous thread. I have my doubts, personally I think it improves but cant prove it cos never been able to keep a bottle long enough.

Sabastapol
10th December 2009, 16:35
Sometime in the 70's I was able, through my job at that time, to obtain 4 cases of a very good 1968 St Emilion. The last bottle of the batch I opened for our Xmas dinner 1987 before we moved house. All my friends had told me that it would be no good. That's 'much too old' they said 'it will be bad'etc etc In fact it was delicious. Wish I had some now!

K urgess
10th December 2009, 17:17
Isn't wine different to spirits when in the bottle?
Wine is fermented and carries on improving whereas spirits are distilled and the process is finished when bottled.
Although I suppose sunlight may have an effect. (?HUH)
I've just been through the larder and found a tin of strawberries in syrup dated 1997. Opened for curiosity before dumping.
They were definitely past their best. [=P]

NoMoss
10th December 2009, 17:23
Isn't wine different to spirits when in the bottle?
Wine is fermented and carries on improving whereas spirits are distilled and the process is finished when bottled.
Although I suppose sunlight may have an effect. (?HUH)
I've just been through the larder and found a tin of strawberries in syrup dated 1997. Opened for curiosity before dumping.
They were definitely past their best. [=P]

I think that is correct - spirits don't change once they are bottled, although they do evaporate slightly and fade in colour if exposed to too much light.

The bottle of whisky I recently sold had evaporated down to the shoulder of the bottle.

When Cognac is being made the loss due to evaporation is called 'The Angels' Share'.

K urgess
10th December 2009, 17:30
It'll be the concentration due to evaporation and the fact that it was made with better quality water that makes an old bottle of spirits more valuable then. (Thumb)

My wine had a tendency to get too strong to be safe when I went through my home-made wine, pipe-smoking, olde English sheepdog phase. [=P]

ray bloomfield
10th December 2009, 17:35
In a scotch distillery the '''evaporation'' is called distillers perks!!, quite nice too (so I've heard) before being barreled.
''''The bottle of whisky I recently sold had evaporated down to the shoulder of the bottle''''


Are you sure the evaporation didn't occur thru' the cork with a hypodermic needle?

Sabastapol
10th December 2009, 19:07
Isn't wine different to spirits when in the bottle?
Wine is fermented and carries on improving whereas spirits are distilled and the process is finished when bottled.
Although I suppose sunlight may have an effect. (?HUH)
I've just been through the larder and found a tin of strawberries in syrup dated 1997. Opened for curiosity before dumping.
They were definitely past their best. [=P]

Hi Kris
You are right about spirits. But wine is a different kettle of fish. To keep wine properly it must be laid on its side,hence racks. This is to keep the 'cork' wet to maintain the seal. If the seal is broken, wine finito. It should be kept in a cool place and idealy out of the light. It does not improve. I watched a group of Wine masters once doing a tasting. Swilling the glass, smelling, tasting, and then spitting out the sample and saying things like 'That will be good in three months' or 'that is ready for bottling now'. There would not be much point in all that if in 12 months time the wine had changed to something different. Some wines have floaters in them left from the lees that has inadvertantly got into the wine when it its bottled. I believe some drinkers think this improves a wine. I doubt it. (bit different when talking about Port though.
Garth

Huytonbrian
11th December 2009, 23:33
Sell by dates stamped on eggs make me smile, how long did we have them on board, as long as they were kept cool and the galley boy turned the boxes weekly to stop the yolks sticking to the shell, they were fine.