Pound and point(pint)

jim garnett
12th December 2009, 01:35
Back in the early fifties the crew not being happy with the food decided to demand their pound and
point.It never happened and I've now forgotten whay it meant.Can any old timer please refrsh my memory.Our victualling at the time was 8shillings a day.apparently quite good at the time.
Jim Garnett

dom
12th December 2009, 03:16
being short of the board of trade rations,as a peggy on the castle boats,can remember getting to cobs of bread a day,one in the morning one afternoon,tea sugar was measured with the big [pint] mug,8 in the messroom8 pints

Burned Toast
13th December 2009, 13:07
BoT rations(Thumb) issued each week.(MAD)

tell
15th December 2009, 01:02
pound and pint ! if you thought you were being short changed on your stores you could demand them all being weighed out in front of you,there was a board of trade allowance chart always available

K urgess
15th December 2009, 12:04
Here's the rate for 1943

non descript
15th December 2009, 12:11
Here's the rate for 1943

Did you take this from the Articles you signed on The World's Favourite Tanker ? (Jester)

K urgess
15th December 2009, 12:49
Even earlier, Sir. (==D)

IT IS an ancient Mariner,
And he stoppeth one of three.
'By thy long grey beard and glittering eye,
Now wherefore stopp'st thou me?

The Bridegroom's doors are opened wide,
And I am next of kin;
The guests are met, the feast is set:
May'st hear the merry din.'

He holds him with his skinny hand,
'There was a ship,' quoth he.
'Hold off! unhand me, grey-beard loon!'
Eftsoons his hand dropt he.

He holds him with his glittering eye--
The Wedding-Guest stood still,
And listens like a three years' child:
The Mariner hath his will.

The Wedding-Guest sat on a stone:
He cannot choose but hear;
And thus spake on that ancient man,
The bright-eyed Mariner.

'The ship was cheered, the harbour cleared,
Merrily did we drop
Below the kirk, below the hill,
Below the lighthouse top.

The Sun came up upon the left,
Out of the sea came he!
And he shone bright, and on the right
Went down into the sea.

The rime of the Ancient Mariner
Samuel Taylor Coleridge
1798

R396040
16th December 2009, 14:44
Back in the early fifties the crew not being happy with the food decided to demand their pound and
point.It never happened and I've now forgotten whay it meant.Can any old timer please refrsh my memory.Our victualling at the time was 8shillings a day.apparently quite good at the time.
Jim Garnett

Hi Jim,
Yes they called it getting your wack. I was on British Tanker in 1948 and she was a poor feeder though having been brought up on wartim e rationing didnt find it so bad in retrospect. Cant believe some of the wimpish comments on some of the other catering posts about food etc. Think the worse thing for me was being issued once weekly with tin of condensed milk, if it run out, tough ! No other milk powdered or fresh (whats that ! ) We made two holes with beer opener and covered holes with toilet paper to keep out the cockroaches which abounded. I think I still have somewhere a copy of ships articles which listed your food entitlement. Some companies worse than others of course, that company in those days was known as B etter T imes C oming, BTC......
Stuart

Cisco
17th December 2009, 05:24
Hi Jim,
I was on British Tanker in 1948 and she was a poor feeder
Stuart
Some things never change... only time I have ever heard of the crew going on their wack was when my father was on British Earl in the late 20s'/early 30s.

Trampshipman
13th August 2010, 20:56
Hi Jim,
Yes they called it getting your wack. I was on British Tanker in 1948 and she was a poor feeder though having been brought up on wartim e rationing didnt find it so bad in retrospect. Cant believe some of the wimpish comments on some of the other catering posts about food etc. Think the worse thing for me was being issued once weekly with tin of condensed milk, if it run out, tough ! No other milk powdered or fresh (whats that ! ) We made two holes with beer opener and covered holes with toilet paper to keep out the cockroaches which abounded. I think I still have somewhere a copy of ships articles which listed your food entitlement. Some companies worse than others of course, that company in those days was known as B etter T imes C oming, BTC......
Stuart

If I remember rightly, when with Hungry Hogarths [Baron Line] in 1949, our tin of condensed milk had to last us 10 days. Your other dry stores like tea, cocoa, sugar, etc were weighed out weekly, but for some strange reason our tin of `conny onny`had to last 10 days.
Apart from that the bulk of your grub was always full of weevils. Bread looked like currant bread, and when you had pea wack [lentil soup] it would contain more weevils than lentils. You ate everything anyway as the only alternative was to do without. After all these years something has only just occurred to me. WE WERE GETTING RIPPED OFF ! When weighing out our pound and pint to the galley no allowance was made for the weevils !

Ken.

donald duck
11th December 2010, 15:07
Being an apprentice in a tramp company 1942, and survived, I agree that the main complaint was condensed milk - we (two of us) had one tin per week to share. The worst thing was to see a cockroach emerging from the hole if one of us forgot to bung a hole up. Tomato(?) soup, stewed seagull, BOT duff with Jessie's dream for Sundays - and where did the Cook find all those devilled kidneys\?

keithsparks
15th April 2011, 12:13
i remember once on the tug statesman we had this apprentice called Clive he was from York anyhow we were in the sallon being served lunch or dinner if you preferred when up spouted the young sailor boy steward are the peas garden or processed .How the f...k should I know theyre green arent they.....no more questions.