Ships tracked with smart software (BBC News)

SN NewsCaster
15th December 2009, 12:40
Monitoring of global shipping movements could help container vessels burn less fuel and speed up turnaround in port.

More from BBC News... (http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/rss/news/int/search/news%2Bsport/ship/-/2/hi/technology/8413566.stm)

Bobbert
16th December 2009, 08:55
Just read this report on new ways of tracking ships and speeding up movements around ports.

Is this really new? Trying to understand whats new about it?

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/technology/8413566.stm

smithax
17th December 2009, 12:58
I think the only newish thing is the world wide/ deep sea AIS tracking, instead of just coastal. Oh and perhaps the software as well.

Can't see all ships slowing down for an empty berth though as most would have to tender NOR on arrival as per the Charter Party.

Klaatu83
17th December 2009, 19:51
The AIS system came online just before I retired. On my ship we thought it was the stupidest thing we'd ever heard of, for reasons that we thought should have been obvious, but apparently weren't to the many proponents of the system. Surely terrorists and pirates aren't going to waste any time tracking potential targets using AIS; which identifies every ship's position, course, speed, port of origin, port of destination, nationality, and cargo. Every ship the Somali pirates have captured has been equipped with an AIS receiver, which they can remove and put to their own use to locate potential victims. As if that weren't enough, they don't even need an AIS receiver at all, they can simply locate potential targets by accessing AIS transponder data off the internet. These people may be from third-world countries but they're not stupid.