Inamn/Anchor line SS City of Rome

fishjay
18th December 2009, 15:44
I would like to build a simple model of the above mentioned liner. Does anyone have simple drawings of the liner that can be posted here? I have one small profile drawing from Duncan Haws Anchor Line (Merchant Fleets), so I have no idea what the lower hull looks like.

Thanks,

fishjay

jerome morris
22nd December 2009, 18:01
Fishjay, can you post an image of what you have, perhaps then we could give you a good idea.

fishjay
27th December 2009, 02:20
Attached is a scan of the City of Rome that is in Duncan Haw's book Merchant Fleets (Anchor Line). This is the only drawing that I have been able to locate. It is a waterline drawing, so I have no idea what the lower hull looks like. I have not been able to locate a plan drawing of said vessel.

I have looked on line for photos of a museum model of this vessel and again I have come up empty.

All help is greatly appreciated.

fishjay

jerome morris
30th December 2009, 19:10
fishjay,

I'll look around at home. I have a book on the Atlantic lines history, maybe this would have something. The book "The engine powered ship" may have something too.
I also have a large model of Cunards SS Servia circa 1890's which may help you.

jerome morris
31st December 2009, 16:16
fishjay, I looked last night and found a few things.
One thing I'm still looking for is finding out if she was twin screw or single screw.
This obviously would change the underbody, so. I will try to get this stuff to you this weekend, with a little more study.
One thing I have found was the other "sisters" seem to be twin screws.
Do you know if she was single or twin?

fishjay
1st January 2010, 02:39
Jerome,

According to the info in Duncan Haw's book she had a single screw.

Lester (fishjay)

NoR
1st January 2010, 09:19
The Ocean Railway by Stephen Fox (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Ocean-Railway-Isambard-Revolutionary-Steamships/dp/0006532160/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1262337190&sr=1-1) is a good readable history of Atlantic steamships and shipping companies. Quite a few cheap copies on Amazon.

jerome morris
1st January 2010, 21:19
Fishjay, here are some pictures of the Servia that I have in for restoration.
She is similar time peroid and single screw.

fishjay
2nd January 2010, 16:13
Jerome,

Do you know of, or have you ever seen a full hull model of the Rome? An online search mentioned photos of a museum model in SEA BREZZE (magazine?).

Fishjay

P.S. Are you a professional model builder?

jerome morris
5th January 2010, 15:45
Fishjay, No I have not seen a model of the Rome. From what I've read recently she , being built in iron instead of steel was much slower then intended, so was not a popular ship and was sold within a few years. So suspect a model of her would be a rare thing.
And yes, I am a professional model builder. I work out of my home shop (where the Servia is) and I work at a Marine Art Gallery called Art of the Sea, in South Thomaston, Maine, doing mostly restorations of sailing ships.

fishjay
5th January 2010, 23:02
Thanks Jerome,

I got the impression from your photos of the ship in your shop that you are a professional. I have never built ship models professionally, however I have built some industrial models ( gas/oil refineries and offshore platforms) and some aircraft models on a professional basis. My ship models are for my own pleasure and relaxation.

Once again, thanks for your information and input.

fishjay (Lester)

P.S. Several days ago I posted photos (model gallery) of a paper model of the CSS Missouri that I built recently.

jerome morris
7th January 2010, 17:38
I build for pleasure as well fishjay, mostly plastic merchant ships when I can find them. It is so nice to build a kit and not have to scratch build everything.
Though scratch building does have a big advantage.
Good luck with the City of Rome.

Scousegit
8th January 2010, 20:43
There are no drawings for the City of Rome - so I'm told. All the Barrow drawings went to the NMM at Greenwich. They or the Science Museum have a number photographs two of which show the ship on the slip prior to launch.

Barrow Bock Museum has a half hull fully rigged model of the ship @1/48=1ft scale; the Science Museum has a smaller model probably @1/16=1" which has been illustrated in some publications. Both where at Barrow some years ago when I photographed them however, the smaller one was due to be returned to London soon afterwards.

The Science Museum also has a fine model of the Servia My Great Grandfather was also an engineer in the ship as well as many other Cunard vessels of that period.

Scouse.

jerome morris
13th January 2010, 14:38
Scouse, You wouldn't perchance have a picture of the stern decoration of the Servia would you?
This is one detail I would like to add, but have found no reference for.