Solomon Browne

Stoneroad
20th December 2009, 00:38
Hi All,

Please pause for a few moments today to honour the bravery of the crew in the RNLB "Solomon Browne" lost on service, and those on the "Union Star" that they had sought to save. Twenty-eight years ago, on the 19th December at 2121 radio contact was lost with the lifeboat.

We will remember them.

Thank you.

GWB
20th December 2009, 00:49
Well they they rest in peace along with the crew off the Brought Ferry boat lost few years before, The boat was recovered along with the crew all dead in the cabin only one was never found. The boat was taken to Fife and burnt.
My Grandfather had to bury most off them.

boatnutter
15th February 2010, 22:35
these where all brave men and will all be missed...my granddad and my dad new all of the crew.....


my thoughts go out to all of the families of the brave crew that where sadly lost their lives on that dreadful night..

Stoneroad
19th December 2013, 08:56
I shall raise a glass tonight, in an annual moment of reflection and remembrance, especially since the recent weather has been rather stormy.
Please join me..................
Stoneroad

nhp651
23rd December 2013, 00:41
can I just say as time marches on it is now 32 years ago, on the night of the 19/12/1981...and the memories are still raw

God bless them all. Any man/woman who goes out in such awful weather to rescue those that he knows not, is the bravest of the brave and has my full admiration and respect.

ex-RNLI
22nd November 2014, 12:16
"They shall not grow old -as we that are left grow old.
Age shall weary them not, nor the years condemn;
At the going down of the sun, and in the morning,
We will remember them".

Lest we forget.

"The Ode" was actually written by a schoolteacher (whose name escapes me right now), during World War 1 - the "war to end all wars"

I have used it in on Anzac Day commemorations - yes I'm an ozzie now :)

So "Good Day" from down under!

But I served with the RNLB "North Foreland" (Civil Service No.11) at Margate for about 4 years after the RAF taught me to fly in the mid 1950's, and in the end had to leave the area to find a job.

I have a few pages, not completely finished, about the life-boat service in the 50s-60s and talk to groups about The "Solomon Browne". as this happened maybe 30 years after I left our Watson Class boat which is fortunate that she was kept intact for posterity at Chatham museum, notwithstanding the 48 hours of mayhem that winds and seas did when they destroyed Margate's iron jetty that the boathouse was two-thirds of the way up to where the "Royal Sovereign" used to berth.

A "Sea King" similar to "Rescue-80" winched the crew onto the boat to launch her and take her into harbour so they could blow up the

my (unfinished) site www.rnli.southaust.net has some photos, there is a huge number if you go looking.

And my after-dinner chats to mostly older people include three pieces out of the epic documentary video that the BBC made called "Cruel Sea" in honour of the bravery of the crew of the Solomon Browne.

Broughty Ferry happened shortly before my family and I left the UK for Australia

Thank you guys,

Lest we forget
(from Richard in Australia)

Neil Mant
22nd November 2014, 12:24
Joined the Port Chalmers in 1977 and one of th AB's was Kevin Smith what a nice lad sailed again with him he went on leave and was supposed to come back but never did what a sad loss

ex-RNLI
23rd November 2014, 06:14
Yes Neil, I agree.
I never knew him or the others.
His sister describes his character well, and the interview the BBC did for a previous service shows his character.

In many ways it was fortuitous that they went out to the "Lovatt" disaster and the BBC built a programme around that service.because they were able to build a more poignant story including the considerable stock footage they had already recorded.

I for one realised the character those lads had from sensitive editing.

The narrator even admitted he asked a stupid question during (I think) his chat with Kevin.

Sorry you lost a good mate there.

Oh FYI I was involved for several years in the 70's in TV studio operations, and a little of what was called ENG - Electronic News Gathering in those days. There are good producers and directors, and also bad ones. BBC Bristol had a great team there.

Richard in Ozzie