Doxford Re-Born?

Russken40
21st December 2009, 10:27
All you Doxford lovers out there, have a look at www.doxford-power.com. Is it a wind up or is it for real? I for one would love to think that it is for real!! Dream on????
Russ K (ex Doxford apprentice) (Thumb)

Duncan112
21st December 2009, 10:51
Site appears genuine enough, the renewable spiel is correct and the company is listed at Companies House, although one of the parents is overdue with account filing. Companies appear about 18 months old.

Googling the address reveals a raft of companies at that address so suspect it's a "brass plate" office (nice neighbours though!!)

Hope it flies.

Duncan

Steve Hodges
29th December 2009, 23:15
Methinks they are about to get inundated with c.v.s from mid-fifties ex-marine engineers.............

Doxfordman
30th December 2009, 01:45
Steve,

I reckon you might be right - if they are using the J type which it appears they are, I'll put my name down, nice little job on a stable platform, be a sowing machine, as long there are plenty of spares available and presumably if this is kosher they have bought or got hold off the original Doxford dies and drawings etc. I still have my old 10" Bacho and Brightstar torch - lol.

Mike S
30th December 2009, 14:29
My old Dad will be watching this with interest up there some where! NEM churned out a fair few of those under his stewardship.
R&W did too when he was there for that matter. He was part of the RW Group for a total of 29 years.
I hope they succeed.

THEDOC
6th January 2010, 16:59
All you Doxford lovers out there, have a look at www.doxford-power.com. Is it a wind up or is it for real? I for one would love to think that it is for real!! Dream on????
Russ K (ex Doxford apprentice) (Thumb)

Think of the potential, on a large tanker there could be grow bags on all open deck space growing sunflowers, with a ball mill ion the pump room and a run off into bunkers........(Jester)

john g
11th January 2010, 14:34
An excellent example of marketing styles today. Someone with a dream.. say no more.

chadburn
11th January 2010, 15:47
I think somebody has being doing a bit of this(Smoke) instead of playing on it.(Jester)

Andrew Craig-Bennett
26th February 2010, 16:21
I thought B&W held the rights?

Duncan112
27th February 2010, 10:55
I think B&W have the rights to the Harland and Woolf opposed piston engine, Doxford rights were held by the rump of British Shipbuilders, a check at companies house shows the Sunderland arm of BS (renamed several times, eventually becoming "British Shipbuilders Enterprise" finally being dissolved on 16 Feb this year.

I heard a story in the mid 90's that Sulzer had purchased some of the patents to the fuel system but Sulzer engineers couldn't confirm or deny this.

Satanic Mechanic
7th March 2010, 02:30
Has to be asked though, there has been the world of technological improvements since Doxford went up the beach - why on earth choose Doxford?

paullad1984
7th March 2010, 13:05
reliability?

Satanic Mechanic
7th March 2010, 13:50
reliability?

(EEK)

Wouldn't have been my first answer I must admit. I have taken a MAN B&W 6S70 engine to 20,000 hours without changing anything, and it was giving 30,000 ponies at the shaft. Try that on a Doxford

Billieboy
7th March 2010, 15:06
Reliability?

A (the only) doxford I sailed with, reliably stopped; every day!

paullad1984
7th March 2010, 15:51
Really? general impression id gathered off here and from one or two engineers ive met over the years is one of adoration.

Basil
7th March 2010, 16:11
Hmm, can't help feeling it's a bit suspect.

Winebuff
7th March 2010, 22:35
With one or two (admittedly spectacular on one occasion) failures my experience of the Doxford 6 cylinder J type 67 & 76 cm was that it was very reliable, relatively easy to work on.

Peter Smith
Bank Line 74-84

chadburn
8th March 2010, 11:10
I am trying to trace a list of Doxford's "customers" mainly late 1940's early 50's, does such a list exist?. My reason for the search is in regards to the possible use of previous Doxford's for power generation on the ROTOR system which apparently used "ships engines", because of their height they had to be put in a remote "church like" building (with a high roof) to disguise their true purpose.

Billieboy
10th March 2010, 15:56
Trelissick was 1949 built Hawthorn Leslie Engine #147 I think.

hamishb
15th March 2010, 13:52
I am trying to trace a list of Doxford's "customers" mainly late 1940's early 50's, does such a list exist?. My reason for the search is in regards to the possible use of previous Doxford's for power generation on the ROTOR system which apparently used "ships engines", because of their height they had to be put in a remote "church like" building (with a high roof) to disguise their true purpose.

Hi, if you send a PM to 760J9 he will be happy to to provide information on Doxford customers, just let him know what you would like.
Regards
Hamish.

chadburn
15th March 2010, 13:56
Hi, if you send a PM to 760J9 he will be happy to to provide information on Doxford customers, just let him know what you would like.
Regards
Hamish.

Thank You Hamish.(Thumb)

manolito_1
3rd March 2011, 12:06
I sailed with Ellerman Lines in the 70's as a 'leccy' and used to help the engineers with the maintenance.Ellermans had six ships with doxford engines 6cyl the old type,used to have to knock the bottom end nut off with a 28lb sledge hammer!!standing on a plank in the crankcase,the pistons were water cooled and the elbows in the crankcase were forever leaking.all work on these engines was heavy(not for me I ws only working the crane)hence the name humping thumping Doxford from Sunderland.No doubt ex doxford engineers remember the song sung to Puff the magic dragon.I doubt if Sulzer would be interested as all their nuts etc could be removed hydraulically.The newer J? type doxfords were a lot better.

Billieboy
3rd March 2011, 15:00
Ellermans had six ships with doxford engines 6cyl the old type,used to have to knock the bottom end nut off with a 28lb sledge hammer!!standing on a plank in the crankcase,the pistons were water cooled and the elbows in the crankcase were forever leaking.

Couldn't agree more, one trip, on a four legged Hains job, put me off diesel engines for life!

Derek Roger
3rd March 2011, 15:26
Any diesel engine will burn "rubbish fuel " a better option would be a lightweight 4 stroke with good specific consumption combined with an exhaust gas boiler and steam turbine alternator set . Waste heat from the jacket cooing could be used to produce drinking water with an evaporator if there is a nearby supply of salt or brackish water .
Hardly new technology . The fact that any such system would need a lot of cooling water would require any such system to be on the coast or on a river or have expensive cooling towers . They don't seem to have really thought the idea through .

Doxford76J6
26th March 2011, 17:47
So where are these engines? Nice idea but did they actually build any yet?

Russken40
22nd April 2011, 15:56
So where are these engines? Nice idea but did they actually build any yet?

None that I am aware of. If you have a look at the MAN website, see the engine types and applications they cater for, and also note that they currently employ approx 45,000 workers spread through 3- 4 different countries, I would reckon Doxfords have no chance.............but I could be wrong!!
Russ K (Thumb)

Duncan112
25th April 2011, 00:21
I sent them an e-mail when the thread first appeared as I was, at the time, involved in anaerobic digestion projects - no reply so you can draw your own conclusions on that one -

Duncan

Tim-Lad
16th May 2012, 12:28
Any diesel engine will burn "rubbish fuel " a better option would be a lightweight 4 stroke with good specific consumption combined with an exhaust gas boiler and steam turbine alternator set . Waste heat from the jacket cooing could be used to produce drinking water with an evaporator if there is a nearby supply of salt or brackish water .
Hardly new technology . The fact that any such system would need a lot of cooling water would require any such system to be on the coast or on a river or have expensive cooling towers . They don't seem to have really thought the idea through .

Hi Derek.

I heard about this company last year and have wondered ever since, whether slow peed long stroke diesel engines without any valves wouldn't be just about ideal for "dirty" gaseous fuels from pyrolysis or gasification? Maybe a tiny squirt of diesel at or around 3 degrees before TDC, and a bit of exhaust re-circ to cut down on Nox and dioxins..

Tim

Tim-Lad
16th May 2012, 12:32
I sent them an e-mail when the thread first appeared as I was, at the time, involved in anaerobic digestion projects - no reply so you can draw your own conclusions on that one -

Duncan

I thought that too..

Did find someone who routinely compresses the gas instead and produces a lquid bio-methane that is clean, biogenic and ideal for long stroke engines. (Like Rolls Royce cars)

Christopher Maltin - quite a character!