Forresbank memories

simomatra
11th January 2010, 22:17
Forresbank a day trip in the lifeboat, shot taken in New Guinea in 66-67

From the left Gerry Winter 3rd Engineer, Apprentice, one of the mates if not the mate himself, Dale Alderdice 4th Engineer, the other three I am not sure of.

Second picture is of Dale doing bit of watchkeeping at the Grapes Hotel in Falmouth

Third your truly

Cheers Sam

The picture might help Charlie, Dale should have sailed with you as well.

K urgess
11th January 2010, 22:42
If you need any help with posting the actual photographs either here or in the gallery, a much better option than posting PDFs, then please don't hesitate to ask.
I've also edited the thread title for you.
Regards

simomatra
12th January 2010, 01:24
If you need any help with posting the actual photographs either here or in the gallery, a much better option than posting PDFs, then please don't hesitate to ask.
I've also edited the thread title for you.
Regards
Thanks I tried to do it myself but no go it did not save will try to post the pictures again

Sam

OK all done

Charlie Stitt
12th January 2010, 11:39
No Sam, I don't recognise any of these guys at all. The 3rd/E while I was there was Gordon Harvey from Belfast. Perhaps these photos were taken the trip after I left.:confused: The year I was there, Oct 65 to Oct66 we headed from Hull to US Gulf Ports, Australia, India, Canada, Cuba, US Gulf Ports,Australia then loaded Hobart (zinc) PNG usual copra etc for Liverpool. The Forresbank, that trip was a very happy ship under the Command of Capt Jim McCoy, a good time was had by all. (Thumb)

McMorine
12th January 2010, 11:57
Was the apprentice Steve Mallett from Guernsey C.I?
Regards Mac.

jimthehat
12th January 2010, 11:57
Forresbank ,a good ship brought her out from Sunderland new in may 62(second mate) left in dec 63 master capt Angle,must have come back with copra cos payed off in Birkenhead.

jim

Alistair Macnab
12th January 2010, 21:14
The "Forresbank" along with her sister "Trentbank" were special little ships in that they had a raised poop and were more 'traditional' copra boats than the "Willowbank" four, also from Doxford's. I always had a soft spot for them as they had a more balanced profile.

Several times I have queried the fact that raised poops appeared and disappeared from time to time and no one has told me why. Poops were certainly not required for trim purposes and I have suggested that they may have been an admiralty feature associated with gun mountings in time of need and that shipowners who built in series were expected to fit out a certain percentage of their ships with additional defense features. I wish I had paid more attention to the 'secret' documents when I was master!

simomatra
13th January 2010, 02:20
A picture of the Forresbank the same day as the boat trip, from memory the port was Samari in PNG.

Charlie yes it was the trip after you paid off.

simomatra
13th January 2010, 02:22
Was the apprentice Steve Mallett from Guernsey C.I?
Regards Mac.

I am sorry Mac memory is not that long

Johnnietwocoats
13th January 2010, 04:33
The "Forresbank" along with her sister "Trentbank" were special little ships in that they had a raised poop and were more 'traditional' copra boats than the "Willowbank" four, also from Doxford's. I always had a soft spot for them as they had a more balanced profile.

Several times I have queried the fact that raised poops appeared and disappeared from time to time and no one has told me why. Poops were certainly not required for trim purposes and I have suggested that they may have been an admiralty feature associated with gun mountings in time of need and that shipowners who built in series were expected to fit out a certain percentage of their ships with additional defense features. I wish I had paid more attention to the 'secret' documents when I was master!

I was on the following ships that had Raised Poops....

Eastbank, Fleetbank, Foylebank, Cedarbank. I spent 18 months on the Streambank and she did not have a raised poop as I recall..

TC(Smoke) (Smoke)

Charlie Stitt
13th January 2010, 11:40
Alistair, I was always lead to believe,ships built for the US Gulf Australia/NZ (copra run) had a poop hatch for the carbon black we carried, it was the right size for the amount carried each trip, and it was easier to contain this filthy cargo in the poop hatch, well away from other cargo.I always remember carbon black stowed in poop hatch, and on Forresbank, where I was Mate, we carried it there twice. Every Apprentice who sailed on a poop decker on the copra run will I'm sure, remember the poop hatch. (Cloud)

Alistair Macnab
13th January 2010, 16:03
Charlie.....
Using the poop hatch exclusively for carbon black may have been useful at one time but it was not the reason for ships having them! As a matter of fact, I stopped using the poop hatch for any cargo outbound from the Gulf as it cost extra stevedoring expenses owing to its 'small access". Thereafter it was only used when we were stuck for any extra space for any cargo.

The same becames the fate of the reefer chambers in No.2 and 2A lower tweendecks - these spaces were not used for cargo stowage owing to the extra cost involved. (Compass and Beaverbank classes). But I liked No.1 and 2A lower tween deck for carbon black!

You are correct that carbon black was filthy and difficult to clean up afterwards. It was largely superceded when we took to carrying bulk petroleum coke in No.3 Hold in ships that had forward deep tanks.

It wasn't that we were creatures of habit; we made rational decisions to steer certain cargoes into designated ship classes and/or cargo spaces. So your idea of carbon black in the poop hatch was not wrong but was not the whole answer.

lakercapt
13th January 2010, 16:46
Was not these poop deck hatches part of the tonnage measurement fiddle.
Open and closed shelter deck was what I was thinking about as that was sometimes referred to as the tonnage hatch?

simomatra
13th January 2010, 17:49
remember the carbon black well(MAD)

Johnnietwocoats
13th January 2010, 18:46
Alistair, I was always lead to believe,ships built for the US Gulf Australia/NZ (copra run) had a poop hatch for the carbon black we carried, it was the right size for the amount carried each trip, and it was easier to contain this filthy cargo in the poop hatch, well away from other cargo.I always remember carbon black stowed in poop hatch, and on Forresbank, where I was Mate, we carried it there twice. Every Apprentice who sailed on a poop decker on the copra run will I'm sure, remember the poop hatch. (Cloud)

Hi Charlie:

Carried Carbon Black quite a few times. Don't recollect it in the Poop.

Seems it was stored in or around the after deep tanks.....

See attached photo of Myself, Lefty Wright and Paddy Ramsey after cleaning the cargo spaces.......Terrible stuff.

TC(Smoke)

Charlie Stitt
13th January 2010, 18:57
Lakercapt, if my memory serves me right, we had a Tonnage Hatch as well as a Poop Hatch. All mooring ropes, rat guards etc etc were stowed in the Tonnage Hatch Also, I am ALMOST sure we had openings with weather boards between Poop and Tonnage Hatch ?

Johnnietwocoats
13th January 2010, 20:03
Lakercapt, if my memory serves me right, we had a Tonnage Hatch as well as a Poop Hatch. All mooring ropes, rat guards etc etc were stowed in the Tonnage Hatch Also, I am ALMOST sure we had openings with weather boards between Poop and Tonnage Hatch ?

Hi Charlie. Here are a couple of photos of the Eastbank showing Samson posts and Derricks on the Poop deck....Was that the Tonnage Hatch? I seem to recall that.
If so where would the Poop hatch be....?

TC

Charlie Stitt
13th January 2010, 20:40
John, the tonnage hatch was on the main deck abaft No5 hatch, same width as main hatches but only about six foot wide and depth of tween deck .No derricks served the tonnage hatch and I don't remember it being used for anything other than storage of mooring ropes, fenders etc.(and home for a few rats) The derricks right aft were to serve the poop hatch, the runners I think had to be led to winches at No 5 as the docking winch only had drum ends, is that correct, help!, much water been under bridge Sahib since I be there. When you think about it, that poop hatch was a waste of space, could have been used for crew and so do away with the shower rooms up top. I wonder if its too late for me to apply for a job in the yards drawing office ? Cheers John, Good photos.

IBlenkinsopp
13th January 2010, 20:42
Two coastal trips on Forresbank, most of my time spent down deeptanks with caustic soda and drums of Peroline (Spelling?), Captains Leslie and Howell.
Never saw the sun, engineers wouldn't have us in the duty mess, nearly starved, ran out of socks, paid off bare foot, o happy day

Eddie Bl.

Johnnietwocoats
13th January 2010, 20:56
John, the tonnage hatch was on the main deck abaft No5 hatch, same width as main hatches but only about six foot wide and depth of tween deck .No derricks served the tonnage hatch and I don't remember it being used for anything other than storage of mooring ropes, fenders etc.(and home for a few rats) The derricks right aft were to serve the poop hatch, the runners I think had to be led to winches at No 5 as the docking winch only had drum ends, is that correct, help!, much water been under bridge Sahib since I be there. When you think about it, that poop hatch was a waste of space, could have been used for crew and so do away with the shower rooms up top. I wonder if its too late for me to apply for a job in the yards drawing office ? Cheers John, Good photos.

Thanks Charlie. Now I remember....

Crawled in every inch of the Eastbank as did all apprentices in their respective ships.....

Take care from Vancouver....TC(Smoke)

Charlie Stitt
13th January 2010, 20:59
John the photo of you three taken after cleaning up after carbon black brought back a few memories, I think I may still have traces of it in my pores. It would not surprise me at all if someone was to prove I saw carbon black being stowed in the poop hatch only the ONCE. The more time I take to cast back my memory, the more confused I get, so everybody, dont take what I say too seriously, but to be sure, thats what this forum is all about, that's my excuse, and I'm sticking to it. The only thing I can be 100% sure of, we carried the bulk oil in the deep tanks, now how is that for memory ?(Thumb)

Johnnietwocoats
13th January 2010, 22:16
John the photo of you three taken after cleaning up after carbon black brought back a few memories, I think I may still have traces of it in my pores. It would not surprise me at all if someone was to prove I saw carbon black being stowed in the poop hatch only the ONCE. The more time I take to cast back my memory, the more confused I get, so everybody, dont take what I say too seriously, but to be sure, thats what this forum is all about, that's my excuse, and I'm sticking to it. The only thing I can be 100% sure of, we carried the bulk oil in the deep tanks, now how is that for memory ?(Thumb)

And I remember the steam cleaning with buckets of caust hangin from the Beams....Stil have scars on my shoulders from caustic burns......

Lungs never did get over the carbon black...

Here's a wee story about Carbon Black that I have written in my book.....The Third Mate was Willie McLennan from Larne....

Our next port of call was Wellington which is still in the north island. We didn't stay there too long and then moved on to Lyttleton on the south island. We discharged regular cargo along with our cargo of Carbon Black. The Carbon Black was still in the heavy paper sacks and when they were discharging it lots of the bags burst and the Carbon Black, which as I said before was a very fine black powder, was all over the place. We got it up our noses, in our throats and in our eyes, ears and any other orifice that we had in our body. It was very difficult to wash away. One night while the Third Mate and myself were on board he asked me to go up to the local fish and chip shop to buy a couple of fish suppers.
As he was buying I was very happy to go. I pulled on a shirt, put on my shoes and headed up the dock. As I was in the lineup at the fish and chip shop I could feel these men staring at me. I looked around at them and it was obvious to me that they were a couple of gay stewards off one of the Shaw Savill ships berthed in the harbor. At first I wondered why they were looking at me as I had been in the company of gay people before and had never been approached by one of them. But it wasn't until I got to the counter and looked into the mirror behind the owner then I realized that I had Carbon Black all round my eyes making it look like I had mascara on. I looked back at the two gay guys, smiled, picked up my order and left the chip shot giving a little wigglel of my hips as I walked through the door. But I kept looking back over my shoulder until I got back and board the ship. When I told the Third Mate what happened, he laughed and told me I should be careful.


John(Smoke) (Smoke) (Smoke)

jimthehat
13th January 2010, 22:42
And I remember the steam cleaning with buckets of caust hangin from the Beams....Stil have scars on my shoulders from caustic burns......

Lungs never did get over the carbon black...

Here's a wee story about Carbon Black that I have written in my book.....The Third Mate was Willie McLennan from Larne....

Our next port of call was Wellington which is still in the north island. We didn't stay there too long and then moved on to Lyttleton on the south island. We discharged regular cargo along with our cargo of Carbon Black. The Carbon Black was still in the heavy paper sacks and when they were discharging it lots of the bags burst and the Carbon Black, which as I said before was a very fine black powder, was all over the place. We got it up our noses, in our throats and in our eyes, ears and any other orifice that we had in our body. It was very difficult to wash away. One night while the Third Mate and myself were on board he asked me to go up to the local fish and chip shop to buy a couple of fish suppers.
As he was buying I was very happy to go. I pulled on a shirt, put on my shoes and headed up the dock. As I was in the lineup at the fish and chip shop I could feel these men staring at me. I looked around at them and it was obvious to me that they were a couple of gay stewards off one of the Shaw Savill ships berthed in the harbor. At first I wondered why they were looking at me as I had been in the company of gay people before and had never been approached by one of them. But it wasn't until I got to the counter and looked into the mirror behind the owner then I realized that I had Carbon Black all round my eyes making it look like I had mascara on. I looked back at the two gay guys, smiled, picked up my order and left the chip shot giving a little wigglel of my hips as I walked through the door. But I kept looking back over my shoulder until I got back and board the ship. When I told the Third Mate what happened, he laughed and told me I should be careful.


John(Smoke) (Smoke) (Smoke)
cant remember what ship ,but it was on the far east run(possibly Clydebank) and we apps could enter the tonnage hatch and work our way fwd in the T/ds to where copper ingots were stowed and a few could be hidden away for pocket money in japan.
Sailed with Willie Mclellan on the northern service of ASN in later years,got a photo of him on the bridge of the europic ferry.

jim

Johnnietwocoats
14th January 2010, 04:57
cant remember what ship ,but it was on the far east run(possibly Clydebank) and we apps could enter the tonnage hatch and work our way fwd in the T/ds to where copper ingots were stowed and a few could be hidden away for pocket money in japan.
Sailed with Willie Mclellan on the northern service of ASN in later years,got a photo of him on the bridge of the europic ferry.

jim

Hi Jim....I would be interested in the photo.....

ASN...Can you tell me?

TC

jimthehat
14th January 2010, 10:40
Hi Jim....I would be interested in the photo.....

ASN...Can you tell me?


TC

Hi TC ,will try and get the photo transferred later today,always hit and miss when i try and download photos on SN.
jim

jimthehat
14th January 2010, 11:01
Hi TC now trying to download photo think its there,but no way to check before submitting??

jim

Charlie Stitt
14th January 2010, 11:11
John, ASN was Atlantic Steam Navigation,was first known as Transport Ferry Service and later as Townsend Thoresen, operated Ro Ro Ferries Larne/Belfast to Preston/Cairnryan. Willie like many other ex Bankliners served on these ferries as Master until their retirement. Others like Dave Ramsey as you know were Master with BR/Sealink. I like your story going for a fish supper, are you sure you went straight back to the ship.[=P]

Charlie Stitt
14th January 2010, 11:14
Jim, that is a photo of big Jim McMullan when he was Master of Europic Ferry. Caption saying it was Willie Mc Lellan in wrong ?

jimthehat
14th January 2010, 11:47
Charlie, I bow to your superior northern knowledge only went up there on relief ,but sailed with most of the oldtimers,willie close,Herb mcgibney,Hockings,Alex Ogibly,Ron adamson and a couple others.

jim

Joe C
14th January 2010, 15:12
John the photo of you three taken after cleaning up after carbon black brought back a few memories, I think I may still have traces of it in my pores. It would not surprise me at all if someone was to prove I saw carbon black being stowed in the poop hatch only the ONCE. The more time I take to cast back my memory, the more confused I get, so everybody, dont take what I say too seriously, but to be sure, thats what this forum is all about, that's my excuse, and I'm sticking to it. The only thing I can be 100% sure of, we carried the bulk oil in the deep tanks, now how is that for memory ?(Thumb)

The worst carbon black mess that we had to clear up was on the Moraybank when the bulldozers stowed in the tween deck started shifting gently and poked holes in the carbon black sacks and forty gallon drums of light oil next to them.The mixture was like very black treacle and we had to wade around in it to secure the bulldozers.I dont know how we ever cleaned up with a bar of carbolic soap,but since we spent a lot of our time up to our armpits in all manner of gunge something must have fetched it off.Probably "sougie"(Is that how you spell it?)

Charlie Stitt
14th January 2010, 17:15
Joe C , they probably put you down in the deep tanks while they were being steam cleaned. (Jester) And then it went down the scuppers into the bilges, all in and around the strum boxes. So when it come to wash out time, you got it all over you again.(==D)

Johnnietwocoats
14th January 2010, 17:34
John, ASN was Atlantic Steam Navigation,was first known as Transport Ferry Service and later as Townsend Thoresen, operated Ro Ro Ferries Larne/Belfast to Preston/Cairnryan. Willie like many other ex Bankliners served on these ferries as Master until their retirement. Others like Dave Ramsey as you know were Master with BR/Sealink. I like your story going for a fish supper, are you sure you went straight back to the ship.[=P]

Hi Charlie I did go STRAIGHT back to the ship.......It was a funny encounter though.

Thanks for the info....

As you know I know quite a few of those gentlemen. Eddie Irvine was another Bankliner wasn't he.....

Johnnietwocoats
14th January 2010, 17:37
Hi TC now trying to download photo think its there,but no way to check before submitting??

jim

Thanks for the photos Jim....Don`t think I would have recognised him.....

I don`t think Willie served his time with Bank Line. It seems to me it was his first trip as Third Mate on the Eastbank.....

Charlie Stitt
14th January 2010, 17:43
Yes John, Eddy was the last to retire, as Senior Master, the company was then P and O.
I attach a photo of Forresbank at one of the Pacific Islands, first time around I think, going by the red lead overside.

rcraig
14th January 2010, 20:46
Charlie,

Looking at the name of the boat in the foreground and adding up 2 and 2 to make, I suspect, 93, could the place there have been in the Phillipines?

Charlie Stitt
14th January 2010, 21:21
No Ray, did'nt do phillipines that trip.Looking more closely at the photo,as she is pretty light in the water,we could only have been loading PNG homewards. So this is definitely a PNG port Aug/Sept 1966. Note the derricks topped to also work the poop hatch.

Charlie Stitt
14th January 2010, 22:14
Alistair. Having had a close look back on the fleet I would suggest that poop deckers were a design feature of Harland and Wolf Belfast between Beaverbank 1953 and Hazelbank 1964. during this period All Harland ships built for Bank Line had Poop and Poop Hatches, The compass point ships built by Doxford in 1947/48 had poop, but thereafter only occasionally Doxford built a ship with poop,was it to replace scrappage ? to maintain number of poop deckers in fleet?. You must remember, Bank Line top brass had some ? very old fashioned ideas ( to say the least). But the appearance of a ship with poop is very much OK with me. One may well ask, Why did earlier Harland ships built for the Bank Line Not have Forecastle ? A design whim ? Girder derricks,? a design whim? I reckon its no more than that. But yes it does interest me, and look forward to hearing what others have to say. Perhaps a new thread on Bank Line ship design.

jimthehat
14th January 2010, 23:04
Charlie,Your photo shows the Forresbank looking pretty spick and span ,on her maiden voyage by the time we had got across to the gulf most of our brand new paint had been washed off and she looked very blotchy.

jim

Joe C
14th January 2010, 23:17
Joe C , they probably put you down in the deep tanks while they were being steam cleaned. (Jester) And then it went down the scuppers into the bilges, all in and around the strum boxes. So when it come to wash out time, you got it all over you again.(==D)

I remember when we were rolling heavily and cleaning the strum boxes a breaker you could have surfed on hurtled across the tank top and if you wer'n't sharp and leaped up the spar ceiling you were caught with your head down in the bilge,holding your breath and trying not to swallow too much sulfuric acid.Cleared your head though!

Keith2704
15th March 2011, 20:54
Lovely ship. My introduction to Bank line in 1975. Sailed from Liverpool on Christmas Eve. I was in the pub over the road. the carrodus I think it was, so were the tug crew who were taking us out. Arrived back on board shortly before midnight to be told I should have been on watch since 2000. Being a lecky newly arrived form the rarefied atmosphere of Union Castle I hadn't a clue about this.. had a great time round the coast on the 12 to 4. Fled in the dry dock in South Sheilds and was sent off to the Corabank. I'll never ever forget the Forresbank.

david harrod
17th March 2011, 04:41
No Ray, did'nt do phillipines that trip.Looking more closely at the photo,as she is pretty light in the water,we could only have been loading PNG homewards. So this is definitely a PNG port Aug/Sept 1966. Note the derricks topped to also work the poop hatch.

Lae or Madang? I think most likely Lae...

pete
17th March 2011, 10:02
Dave, could that be Honiara before the big storm washed everything away in 1968. I was there on the Dart when that happened.......pete

david harrod
19th March 2011, 08:18
Dave, could that be Honiara before the big storm washed everything away in 1968. I was there on the Dart when that happened.......pete

It could be; but I am also thinking (and this is a wild guess because I can't place the small boat moorings), Alexishafen...the reason is that often Filipino fishing boats in the tuna trade went there...

rabaul
20th March 2011, 18:08
i did a coastal trip on the Forresbank , second trip cadet , - over Christmas and New Year 1975 - Liverpool , rotterdam through the Keil canal to Aarhus for ten days or so before heading back to dry dock in s shields.

On of my memories is staying in the ships hospital , it had a electric heater and using the bath as we rounded the north of Denmark - there was a force 4 in the bath - forgetting about the Gale outside.

I am still planning to get back to Aarhus _ although it (and I) have changed a little in the past 35 years.

jimthehat
20th March 2011, 23:48
Forresbank ,a good ship brought her out from Sunderland new in may 62(second mate) left in dec 63 master capt Angle,must have come back with copra cos payed off in Birkenhead.

jim
often wondered what happened to the apps on that trip.Did they stay at sea and go on to command?must be in their mid sixties by now and well retired.

jim

simomatra
21st March 2011, 22:51
It could be; but I am also thinking (and this is a wild guess because I can't place the small boat moorings), Alexishafen...the reason is that often Filipino fishing boats in the tuna trade went there...

David it does look like Honiara to me and I know I went there on Forresbank.

John Dryden
21st March 2011, 23:38
Going by how light the ship is Honiara is a good bet as the two trips I did to the south pacific with general cargo were PM, Lae, Madang,Wewak,Kavieng,Rabaul,Ringi cove,Honiara and Noumea and next one similar.However I wish I,d had a camera then to confirm that!

jimthehat
21st March 2011, 23:41
David it does look like Honiara to me and I know I went there on Forresbank.

What port was it where the stern lines were run ashore and secured to trees?/
Where ever it was I was there on the Forresbank and lowering the ropes into a boat,the old mas came astern and one rope got wound round the prop.
We lowered a lifeboat and i went under the stern and clearde away the rope using the turning gear ,using all sorts of signals and shouts to say when the turning gear was used,It was a very useful excercise ,tho the old man blamed me.

jim

John Dryden
21st March 2011, 23:48
Are you sure it was a boat Jim, and not a canoe!

jimthehat
22nd March 2011, 00:03
Are you sure it was a boat Jim, and not a canoe!
definitely a boat ,only place i remember canoes was in Apia where king billy and his wild bunch ran the official ship to shore ferry.

jim

pete
14th May 2011, 09:14
What port was it where the stern lines were run ashore and secured to trees?/
Where ever it was I was there on the Forresbank and lowering the ropes into a boat,the old mas came astern and one rope got wound round the prop.
We lowered a lifeboat and i went under the stern and clearde away the rope using the turning gear ,using all sorts of signals and shouts to say when the turning gear was used,It was a very useful excercise ,tho the old man blamed me.

jim

Jim I think you are thinking of Ghizo (Gizo) where we used a running moor (Port Anchor 8 shackles then Starboard Anchor, Heave away on Port and slack away on Starboard until the stern was close enough to tie up to the nearest couple of Palm Trees). Reverse the process on departure and hope the ME doesn't develop a fault.......pete