Saving Rain Water

kwg
18th January 2010, 11:54
It must have been a 21 Bury St directive, every bank boat I was on devised all sorts of ways to collect rain water from the decks into the domestic water tanks. After the PNG and E. Africa trips we must have been bathing in every disease known.

Billieboy
18th January 2010, 14:23
Running from Boukom to Japan, H-K, and thereabouts for about a year on Llanishen, we were having vap problems, so we rigged the funnel and boat decks aft to collect rain water. I was on the 12-4 and the 2/O used to plot showers to get the maximum rain water, (1-4PPM acids), it got so far that 2/O, could call down 10-20-30 or 40ton showers! It was only after I came ashore that I realized how much money we were saving the owners, as it's a standard that one ton of distilled water costs one ton of fuel. Then, one morning the C/O put the day workers on the funnel and boat decks with holy stones and a drum of Atlas. when I took the first sample that afternoon, the air was blue and the bridge phone nearly melted! Took four watches of almost constant rain to get the water down to acceptable levels.

Donald McGhee
19th January 2010, 06:54
Never had to save rainwater, but well remember waiting for the rain every day at the same time, more or less on the New Guinea/Islands run. We would strip off and stand under the rain soaping ourselves, what a great feeling that was, rain hammering down, cool, clean water! Must make up a song about it! Or maybe it's been done?

The other "water story" was cleaning out the FW tanks alonside the engine room! What a hellish hot job that was, then lime washing the insides, covered in it and gallons of sweat shed. How to be an officer in Bank Line!! This plus bilge diving! Should make that an Olympic sport!(Pint)

slick
19th January 2010, 07:45
All,
Hains boats (1950's) coming home from Australia used to collect rainwater as to run out of the precious stuff was a regular event,
All rain clouds were "engaged" filling pipes were removed, overside scuppers were blocked.
One habit I have retained from those days is to wet down for a minute soap and the a minute wash/rinse down when taking a shower, it is completely beyond my family.

Yours aye,

slick

Joe C
19th January 2010, 15:53
Never had to save rainwater, but well remember waiting for the rain every day at the same time, more or less on the New Guinea/Islands run. We would strip off and stand under the rain soaping ourselves, what a great feeling that was, rain hammering down, cool, clean water! Must make up a song about it! Or maybe it's been done?

The other "water story" was cleaning out the FW tanks alonside the engine room! What a hellish hot job that was, then lime washing the insides, covered in it and gallons of sweat shed. How to be an officer in Bank Line!! This plus bilge diving! Should make that an Olympic sport!(Pint)

Been there, done that ,still got the T-shirt.Can't get it off!

Joe C
19th January 2010, 15:57
All,
Hains boats (1950's) coming home from Australia used to collect rainwater as to run out of the precious stuff was a regular event,
All rain clouds were "engaged" filling pipes were removed, overside scuppers were blocked.
One habit I have retained from those days is to wet down for a minute soap and the a minute wash/rinse down when taking a shower, it is completely beyond my family.

Yours aye,

slick

We did the opposite on the Moraybank heading for home and painting over everything to look the part.We had to dodge the showers so the new paint didn't wash off.

rcraig
19th January 2010, 17:27
Can't remember the rain water but can well remember the salt water showers with the salt water soap, if that is what it was. Not with much affection, though.

Winebuff
19th January 2010, 17:48
I recall drifting in the gulf and having to steam up and down the coast every few days for a couple of hours to run the evaporator to top up the fresh water. It was deemed a cheaper option than getting a fresh water barge out to us. Water rationing meant a 15 minute window to get cleaned up after a watch before the header tanks were shut off again. We were a little annoyed when we found out the master was still having his daily bath. Privilege of rank I think he called it.

Johnnietwocoats
20th January 2010, 05:39
Never had to save rainwater, but well remember waiting for the rain every day at the same time, more or less on the New Guinea/Islands run. We would strip off and stand under the rain soaping ourselves, what a great feeling that was, rain hammering down, cool, clean water! Must make up a song about it! Or maybe it's been done?

The other "water story" was cleaning out the FW tanks alonside the engine room! What a hellish hot job that was, then lime washing the insides, covered in it and gallons of sweat shed. How to be an officer in Bank Line!! This plus bilge diving! Should make that an Olympic sport!(Pint)

Loved doing the Cement Wash in the FW Tanks on all my Bank Line Ships.....

I used to sing in there and it was a great echo chamber...Nobody else agreed....LOL

TC(Smoke) (Smoke)

spongebob
20th January 2010, 06:46
On Rangitane the engineers' bathroom was plumbed with fresh water to the showers and salt water to the bath.
It did not take engineers long to rig up a bath filling line from the shower.

On the little banana boat Navua the monsoon season in the Pacific often saw us with a cake of soap showering on the wooden boat deck in the warm torrential downpours

On the colliers visiting NZ's Westport the practice was to dump all existing fresh water overboard and refill from the local municipal supply to get what was regarded as the sweetest water in the world. Fresh off the Southern Alps,
it made an entirely different cup of tea to say the least.

Bob

tsell
20th January 2010, 07:20
Not to mention the whisky Bob!!

Taff

rcraig
20th January 2010, 09:25
Fresh water showers on the Glenbank for the midship crew were courtesy of us apprentices (with apologies to those who heard this before elsewhere) who pumped it by hand pump at the poop and transported it up to the monkey island tanks every morning, noon and evening by 5 gall. paint drums.

Even the water was handcrafted in those days!

johnb42
20th January 2010, 11:48
Remember opening up one of the FW tanks on the Marabank to do a cement wash and finding a painting stool left in there from the last "wash". Had about a six inch growth of weed clinginging to it.

rcraig
20th January 2010, 16:58
Remember opening up one of the FW tanks on the Marabank to do a cement wash and finding a painting stool left in there from the last "wash". Had about a six inch growth of weed clinginging to it.

What sort of stool?

spongebob
20th January 2010, 23:32
Ive never heard of one being used for painting before but who knows what goes on in the bilges.

McMorine
21st January 2010, 12:17
I remember the crew chipping the salt off the evaporator coils out on the deck and the Chief Cook collecting the salt. Can't imagine what he used it for, talk about re-cycling.
Regards Mac.

K urgess
21st January 2010, 12:40
Probably hoped he could recover the gold and other rare metals. [=P]

eriskay
21st January 2010, 13:12
I remember the crew chipping the salt off the evaporator coils out on the deck and the Chief Cook collecting the salt. Can't imagine what he used it for, talk about re-cycling.
Regards Mac.

Would be excellent for salting fish .... (Thumb)

(However, some designs of evaporators were chemically dosed to convert the scale to a softer and easier-to-remove form, so perhaps not !)

eriskay
21st January 2010, 13:15
Remember opening up one of the FW tanks on the Marabank to do a cement wash and finding a painting stool left in there from the last "wash". Had about a six inch growth of weed clinginging to it.


That reminds me of the horrific story of the ship that was being broken up and two skeletons were discovered in a double-bottom tank, apparently trapped there at some earlier drydocking. Stuff of subsequent nightmares.

johnb42
25th January 2010, 11:28
What sort of stool?

It was the sort you stand on, not stand in.[=P]

rcraig
25th January 2010, 11:57
When we did the gunny run to BA for a year, we heard of the story where a Chapman master got the sack for not topping up the FW from the River Plate once she go into the estuary. For some reason this fitted into the mythical tales of companies even "worse" than Bankline.

Think of the power the company could have exercised on apprentices if they had been able to say to them that if they did not work hard enough they would be sent to Chapmans.

Johnnietwocoats
25th January 2010, 17:46
When we did the gunny run to BA for a year, we heard of the story where a Chapman master got the sack for not topping up the FW from the River Plate once she go into the estuary. For some reason this fitted into the mythical tales of companies even "worse" than Bankline.

Think of the power the company could have exercised on apprentices if they had been able to say to them that if they did not work hard enough they would be sent to Chapmans.

Did Chapmans have Apprentices.....?

I thought I started at the bottom(==D)

My feeling was that there was nowhere to go but up....(Smoke) (Smoke)

China hand
25th January 2010, 18:23
But the Chapmans ships were smashing to see deep loaded - storybook stuff - REAL trampships. We always met up in the Parana, didn't we?(Thumb)

marconista
25th January 2010, 19:37
The vast amount of freshwater coming down the Amazon meant that the water remains brackish quite a way out to sea.

At one time Shell tankers & chartered tonnage returning in ballast from the East coast of South America & bound for Curacao used to pump it into any empty tanks & pump it ashore in Curacao to Shell's refinery where it was used as 'process water'

I think eventually a desalinisation plant was built at Curacao & the practice ceased.

73s

Marco

ccurtis1
26th January 2010, 01:35
Departed Cairns/Townsville fully loaded with sugar for St Johns, New Brunswick with about 12 tonnes of fresh water. The Weirs evaporator needed constant watching else it "primed", and constant changing of the coils with chipping by hand of the removed coils. If memory serves me correctly, we made about 8 tonnes of good salt water every day. This was in 1967. Washing in salt water and having water rationing just to carry a few extra tonnes of sugar, I considered primitive.

simomatra
26th January 2010, 06:22
Departed Cairns/Townsville fully loaded with sugar for St Johns, New Brunswick with about 12 tonnes of fresh water. The Weirs evaporator needed constant watching else it "primed", and constant changing of the coils with chipping by hand of the removed coils. If memory serves me correctly, we made about 8 tonnes of good salt water every day. This was in 1967. Washing in salt water and having water rationing just to carry a few extra tonnes of sugar, I considered primitive.

Did that same run on the Pinebank in 65

Ian Harrod
28th January 2010, 00:45
We always filled our fresh water tanks in the lakes when transitting Panama Canal but I think it was in the early seventies that the Panamanian authorities put a stop to that practice, simply by reading the drafts of the vessel at both ends of the canal!