"Bust Card"

andysk
23rd January 2010, 15:28
Hi All ...

Given the fuss here in the UK about taking pictures in public places and the powers of the authorities under Section 44 of the Terrorism Act 2000, this link to a 'cut out and keep' card might be useful.

http://photographernotaterrorist.org/bust-card/

Print it out and keep it with you - just in case.

See also the BBC for a report on today's activity on Trafalgar Square :

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/8476318.stm

Cheers

Andy

benjidog
23rd January 2010, 17:33
Couldn't load the first URL in Internet Explorer 7 but can load it OK with Google Chrome.

Thats another Story
23rd January 2010, 17:43
They can allways go to google earth street map? stupid laws.

treeve
23rd January 2010, 18:29
Not so much the Law but the paranoia under which it is applied.

Captain America
25th January 2010, 17:21
Or the paranoia of the people it is applied to. Anyone going about lawful activity with nothing to hide has nothing to worry about. Stop and think about the atrocities that the legislation is intended to prevent and get a grip. The protest organiser is a joke.

andysk
29th January 2010, 23:15
.... Anyone going about lawful activity with nothing to hide has nothing to worry about. .....

I have taken some time to think about this and to decide whether or not to respond; I have no wish to descend into a "flame war", but this comment cannot go unchallenged.

This is the same old lame excuse trotted out all the time, and has no validity.

The state is paranoid about knowing in infinite detail what each and every one of it's citizens are up to, at all times. It doesn't know what it wants this information for at the moment but it wants it in case it may come in useful one day.

If the state distrusts it's citizens to this extent, then it has surely lost the mandate to govern.

There is so much information being gathered on it's citizens, that it can't all be assessed by humans, so advanced computing programmes are used to automate this by looking for keywords, phrases, context etc, which will lead to erroneous conclusions being drawn. The individual will have no idea of this but could be denied credit, service, etc without any redress.

Furthermore the record of the UK authorities in keeping it's citizen's personal information secure is best described as lamentable ! Disappearing memory sticks, CD's consigned to the post and lost, hackers, unsecure laptops stolen - it goes on.

If to be worried about security of my personal data is paranoia, then yes I am paranoid - in common with plenty of others. It's a recipe for wholesale identity theft, and all the problems that causes.

Treeve is absolutely correct, it's the paranoia with which it is applied by Jobsworths who have no wider agenda than to see just how difficult and awkward they can be towards those going about their normal and ordinary everyday business.

Frank P
30th January 2010, 00:29
The state is paranoid about knowing in infinite detail what each and every one of it's citizens are up to, at all times. It doesn't know what it wants this information for at the moment but it wants it in case it may come in useful one day.

If the state distrusts it's citizens to this extent, then it has surely lost the mandate to govern.

There is so much information being gathered on it's citizens, that it can't all be assessed by humans, so advanced computing programmes are used to automate this by looking for keywords, phrases, context etc, which will lead to erroneous conclusions being drawn. The individual will have no idea of this but could be denied credit, service, etc without any redress.

Furthermore the record of the UK authorities in keeping it's citizen's personal information secure is best described as lamentable ! Disappearing memory sticks, CD's consigned to the post and lost, hackers, unsecure laptops stolen - it goes on.

If to be worried about security of my personal data is paranoia, then yes I am paranoid - in common with plenty of others. It's a recipe for wholesale identity theft, and all the problems that causes.

Treeve is absolutely correct, it's the paranoia with which it is applied by Jobsworths who have no wider agenda than to see just how difficult and awkward they can be towards those going about their normal and ordinary everyday business.

I could not agree more.

Cheers Frank. (Thumb)

eldersuk
31st January 2010, 00:16
Don't forget that the paranoia of the State could well extend to taking a DNA sample. This, to me, is the ultimate intrusion.

Derek

John Dryden
31st January 2010, 00:37
Don,t think so because if DNA comes into it you are already under suspicion and it,s not that clever anyway as is the photo mallarkey ban as most mobile phones take 'em anyway so cctv and DNA are really not intrusive just hi-tec policing.

andysk
31st January 2010, 20:54
Don,t think so because if DNA comes into it you are already under suspicion and it,s not that clever anyway as is the photo mallarkey ban as most mobile phones take 'em anyway so cctv and DNA are really not intrusive just hi-tec policing.

I go with this in part John, but you are only under suspicion if arrested, and as almost everything is an arrestable offense nowadays .... Need I say more about why the UK has the biggest DNA database by far in the world.

There are issues with obtaining and retention of children's DNA as well, but this is not the forum to discuss that I think.

All samples should be destroyed if the person is not charged or is found Not Guilty. Although the EU has instructed the UK Government to destroy samples after a certain period of time, this is still not being done. And, being a tad cynical (what you ? No ! I hear you shout !), if I were told it was being done, what proof do I have that it is being done beyond a Chief Constable telling me so (with a straight face) ?

Duncan112
31st January 2010, 21:12
Apropos the collection of information by the state - my partners nephew has applied for a CRB check so he can help in the local primary school (he wants to do a MEd and train as a teacher) one of the questions on the form asked for his bank account details and his mothers maiden name - this would be sufficient information to go a good way into hacking his account.

Bearing in mind the Governments casual approach to handling secure data is this really what they should be recording - nothing to fear - I think not.

Mods - if you feel this is straying too far from the thread please remove

Duncan

benjidog
31st January 2010, 22:10
Apropos the collection of information by the state - my partners nephew has applied for a CRB check so he can help in the local primary school (he wants to do a MEd and train as a teacher) one of the questions on the form asked for his bank account details and his mothers maiden name - this would be sufficient information to go a good way into hacking his account.

Bearing in mind the Governments casual approach to handling secure data is this really what they should be recording - nothing to fear - I think not.

Mods - if you feel this is straying too far from the thread please remove

Duncan

Duncan,

As I think this thread is about paranoia I think you are bang on topic.

Remember - just because you are paranoid - it doesn't mean they are NOT out to get you! (Jester)

Klaatu83
31st January 2010, 22:33
I've never heard of anyone having any trouble about taking pictures in Britain. People are civilized there, they don;t think it steals a piece of you virtue, the way the Arabs do. However, when was in Yemen one of our crew snapped a picture as our ship was docking at Al Hudaydah. The very first individuals up the gangway were three Yemeni soldiers armed with automatic rifles, with fixed bayonets, looking for the crewman in question, whom they found taking a shower. It was all our captain could do to manage to persuade the Yemenis not to haul him away immediately, as is.

andysk
31st January 2010, 22:52
I've never heard of anyone having any trouble about taking pictures in Britain. People are civilized there, they don;t think it steals a piece of you virtue, the way the Arabs do. However, when was in Yemen one of our crew snapped a picture as our ship was docking at Al Hudaydah. The very first individuals up the gangway were three Yemeni soldiers armed with automatic rifles, with fixed bayonets, looking for the crewman in question, whom they found taking a shower. It was all our captain could do to manage to persuade the Yemenis not to haul him away immediately, as is.

Klaatu83 : sadly, there has been a lot in the UK press in recent months about this very subject, with photographers who are accredited press photographers, professionals and amateurs being hauled away by the authorities for taking pics of street scenes (in which a policeman could have appeared), architectural pictures of buildings and building details, and one case local to me, an amateur snapper taking pics of the Christmas decorations and lights in a small town in the south of the UK.

So it really does happen, though it rarely makes the front pages of the international media in he same way as the antics of the politicians and world leaders do !

andysk
31st January 2010, 22:55
... Remember - just because you are paranoid - it doesn't mean they are NOT out to get you! (Jester)

He said looking over both his shoulders at the same time, (twitch twitch) then the men in white coats arrived and .....

But they couldn't find anywhere to put him, 'cos it's all Care in the Community now ....

So they made him an MP !!!!