Bankline Musical Memories.....

Alan Rawlinson
1st February 2010, 08:09
Some of the contributions lately have referred to happy memories triggered by songs or melodies enjoyed during the Bankline days. For me, there is nothing like a few bars of a long forgotten tune to instantly whizz me back to a (usually) magic time.

To start things off , what about the lovely island parting song, last heard on No 4 hatch - Isa Lei - in Fiji Have just found it again on youtube under '' Fijian Song Isa lei '' sung by a girl group. I can smell the coconut oil now.

Such happy memories - not to be forgotten!

rcraig
1st February 2010, 11:20
Now tell us about these girls who smelt of coconut oil....

"Isa Lei" was certainly one bringing back memories of the islands. Walking along the shore one star lit night on the beach in Tarawa....spoilt a bit by the wreckage of war all around.

"Shina na yoru", as I said in the other thread, very fond memories of Japan together with "Tanko Bushi" the coal miners' song with the holding of the hands together, swinging them up and then clapping. As coal miners do, of course.

Hank William's "Half as Much" while drooling my way back to Japan for my second trip and all his songs whilst running in the South Atlantic, and Buenos Aires.

And the calypsos which I picked up from my first foreign port which can still capture the magic of Pt. Fortin. Yes, magic in Pt. Fortin. It was after all my first foreign port, apart from Bromborough docks. Fire flies, rum and coca cola, strumming guitar, and the Shell(?) club.

"Jack and Jill went up the hill,
To have a little hankie pankie,
Jack came back with a dollar bill,
Jill came back with a Yankee

Drinking rum and coca cola,
Go down Point Kumona (?),
Both mother and daughter,
Working for the Yankee dollar

Money in the land, Yankee dollar bill,
Money in the land, Yankee dollar bill"

An infinitely more poignant and telling version that the sanitised and dull Andrew sister ruination.
Whenever I hear the tune (not heard the above version recorded in Youtube) I see fireflies. Mind you, I think I also see them when I've drunk too much.

Can't think of any tunes associating me with Calcutta. Wonder why? Like Indian music so maybe that's it.

rcraig
1st February 2010, 11:40
Oh, and "O Mein Papa"....Port Elizabeth, East London, Durban, Dar-es-Salaam, Zanzibar, Lourenco Marques, Mombasa, Beira......maybe the last one we can forget...

Joe C
1st February 2010, 12:36
" Rock Around the Clock",Bill Haley and The Comets, live at the Aukland town hall nineteen-fifty something or other,and Louis Armstrong live in Melbourne around the same time bring back memories.We sat on temporary seating on scaffolding on the stage in Melbourne and upstairs in the circle at the Town Hall in Aukland watching the teenagers dancing in the aisles downstairs.They didn't rip out the seats in New Zealand.Dancing in the aisles made the headlines!

Joe C
1st February 2010, 15:08
"Ach pliz deddy vont you tak me to the biscope" Durban,1950s.
I thought I might introduce it to the Barbershop Chorus I sing with but maybe the're not ready for it?

Billieboy
1st February 2010, 16:13
Yokohama in the sixties,

"She ain't got no Yo-yo"

Alan Rawlinson
1st February 2010, 18:08
"Ach pliz deddy vont you tak me to the biscope" Durban,1950s.
I thought I might introduce it to the Barbershop Chorus I sing with but maybe the're not ready for it?


Hi Joe,

Do you have any Barbershop renditions on you tube? ( If not, why not!)

Joe C
1st February 2010, 18:28
Hi Joe,

Do you have any Barbershop renditions on you tube? ( If not, why not!)

We,ve made some CDs,usually Christmas songs and similar,but no DVDs as yet,who knows?

Charlie Stitt
1st February 2010, 22:30
No more grinding in exhaust valves
No more pumping up the blast
We will tell dear uncle Andy
To stick the blast jobs up his ass.
A favourite among Engineers on the old blastjob Myrtlebank 1955. Andy, of course, referring to Andrew Weir.

Macphail
1st February 2010, 22:48
1967, "Beach Boys", "Good Vibrations", blasting out on the local radio station as we headed into Brisbane, on a Friday evening after a Pacific crossing.

Happy days.

John.

John Dryden
1st February 2010, 22:50
A bit later but to this day anything by Credence Clearwater Revival (Proud Mary,Who,ll Stop The Rain,Greenriver etc)reminds me of the bars in Penang circa 69/70 when they were full of servicemen on r&r from Vietnam.Also Sugar Sugar by the Archies because all the girls around the world knew the words!

Charlie Stitt
1st February 2010, 23:33
I was a Jim Reeves fan. A sentimental Irishman.(Sad)
Oh I know that I won't forget you.
Put your sweet lips a little closer to the phone.

I remember, when I sailed on the Laganbank 1959, I had a tape recorder and played Jim Reeves, Irish ballads and the like. Capt R A Leach had his charming Wife on board, when she heard my music, she would come down the stairs and ask me to turn up the volume. She and her old man obviously had the same taste in music as I. Capt Leach was also a classical music fan,he and his dear wife spent many an hour with me on the 8 to 12 watch trying to convince me that classical music was the experience of a lifetime, "you shoud try it sometime 3rd Mate" They were older than me of course. I do appreciate a little bit of that sort of thing NOW.

Donald McGhee
2nd February 2010, 01:59
I was the recipient of a good hiding in the smugglers bar in Durban many years ago when I was persuaded to burst into song, title of which was 'there are twnty thousand b......s in the old Transvaal and theres room for twenty thousand more'.
The drink of choice was Cape Brandy, 110% high octane and NOT to be indulged in by anyone who had a normal constitution. I was still learning!
On very painful hindsight this was not a good thing, but being young and very pissed I was bullet, bomb, dust and waterproof at the time. Alas I was not proof against a good thumping. My own fault.
On a happier note we will all remember what was affectionately known as the "Bank Line Beat"! A slow monotonous foot thumping to any and all music, especially when drink had been taken.
Happy days. (Pint)

Alan Rawlinson
2nd February 2010, 07:42
Inchanga 1952 arriving Durban, the Bluff in sight. - Johny Ray - '' Just crying in the rain ''

Lynch ( later S Africa Superintendent ) was the second mate....

How's that for pure nostalgia!

K urgess
2nd February 2010, 12:08
I seem to remember anything that had the same beat as a four legged Doxford went down very well. [=P]

rcraig
2nd February 2010, 14:11
Inchanga 1952 arriving Durban, the Bluff in sight. - Johny Ray - '' Just crying in the rain ''

Lynch ( later S Africa Superintendent ) was the second mate....

How's that for pure nostalgia!

Alan,

That is pure nostalgia, but is it, as so often is not with mine, right?

Was his song not a hit in the UK until 1956? Usually, hit parade's came along in the southern hemisphere some time after the UK, and the UK lagged some time after the USA one. Just asking as a member of the RPS, the Royal Pedantic Sociery of which so far, I am the only and founding member.

Ray

Alan Rawlinson
2nd February 2010, 15:12
Alan,

That is pure nostalgia, but is it, as so often is not with mine, right?

Was his song not a hit in the UK until 1956? Usually, hit parade's came along in the southern hemisphere some time after the UK, and the UK lagged some time after the USA one. Just asking as a member of the RPS, the Royal Pedantic Sociery of which so far, I am the only and founding member.

Ray

Hi Ray,

You are right , of course! Strange how the mind plays tricks...

It was '' The little white cloud that cried '' in 1952. I remember clearly it was Johny Ray, because he made such a peculiar sound. Then there was '' Singing in the rain '' by Gene Kelly which I saw the same year in Calcutta, in a cinema just off Chowringee - can't recall the name, but it was pure magic after being stuck out on the Hooghly moorings...

Can I formally apply to be a member of the RPS please, as I am of a like mind?

Joe C
2nd February 2010, 15:17
Les Brown and his Band of Renown, on Hour of Jazz,which I think was on AFN,washing in and out as reception faded on short wave.
But the introduction to commercial radio with adverts for all manner of strange things.The Aussie ads I recall include "I love aeroplane jelly,aeroplane jelly for tea", and of course,"Fine Wine Tintara"
Now that's the power of advertising,when you can still remember the jingles of 50 years ago and can't remember what you had for dinner yesterday!

Joe C
2nd February 2010, 15:19
Hi Ray,

You are right , of course! Strange how the mind plays tricks...

It was '' The little white cloud that cried '' in 1952. I remember clearly it was Johny Ray, because he made such a peculiar sound. Then there was '' Singing in the rain '' by Gene Kelly which I saw the same year in Calcutta, in a cinema just off Chowringee - can't recall the name, but it was pure magic after being stuck out on the Hooghly moorings...

Can I formally apply to be a member of the RPS please, as I am of a like mind?

Can I be a pedant too?

rcraig
2nd February 2010, 18:21
Alan,

That is pure nostalgia, but is it, as so often is not with mine, right?

Was his song not a hit in the UK until 1956? Usually, hit parade's came along in the southern hemisphere some time after the UK, and the UK lagged some time after the USA one. Just asking as a member of the RPS, the Royal Pedantic Sociery of which so far, I am the only and founding member.

Ray

And I might add, on the basis of the above, I have newly founded the R.C.S.S, the Royal Convoluted Sentence Society.
Ray

rcraig
2nd February 2010, 18:24
Les Brown and his Band of Renown, on Hour of Jazz,which I think was on AFN,washing in and out as reception faded on short wave.
But the introduction to commercial radio with adverts for all manner of strange things.The Aussie ads I recall include "I love aeroplane jelly,aeroplane jelly for tea", and of course,"Fine Wine Tintara"
Now that's the power of advertising,when you can still remember the jingles of 50 years ago and can't remember what you had for dinner yesterday!

Sorry Joe, the last part has nothing to do with advertising.

Eddie Wallace
2nd February 2010, 19:02
I was on the runic lying in Bluff and Bill Haley was giving it rock around the clock some of us got out of our seats and started giving it big licks in the cinema isle ,we got heaved out but a great time was had by all.
Isa Lei was sung as we were leaving Suva while on Canberra what a great song that is,attended a old folks home and one of the staff started signing Isa Lei, the memories just flooded back a really great song.

boatlarnie
2nd February 2010, 19:13
In 1967 on the Irisbank (1964 model) songs of choice were Adge Cutler and the Wurzel Mungels singing all the Somerset Cider songs. Boy, did we let rip when the R/O. Jim Halpin, put those records on. At some of the parties we had in Durban and Cape Town, the ladies looked on in amazement as we belted out the words to 'Pill, Pill, I love you Still' and 'Drink they Zider".

Boatlarnie

Johnnietwocoats
2nd February 2010, 22:09
I was on the runic lying in Bluff and Bill Haley was giving it rock around the clock some of us got out of our seats and started giving it big licks in the cinema isle ,we got heaved out but a great time was had by all.
Isa Lei was sung as we were leaving Suva while on Canberra what a great song that is,attended a old folks home and one of the staff started signing Isa Lei, the memories just flooded back a really great song.

Hee you go....Click and enjoy...TC

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2xxJyMtyMgw

Winebuff
2nd February 2010, 22:26
Endless replays of Billy Connelly "live" somewhere, I lost the will to live. The Scottish Lecky used to bring it out at every opportunity.

simomatra
2nd February 2010, 22:30
How many remember playing Doxfords.

All lined up in a line and bobbibg up in down in time singing:


I'm a little Doxford, a Doxford, a Doxford,
A Doxford am I

Usually had the second organizing the timing of the engine and remember you also had to move your arms as well.

The Beetles were also very big during my time in Bankline

Used to mezzmerized by Marianne Faithfull as well, fond memmories.

Also can't remember what I had for breakfast 10 minutes ago LOL

TonyAllen
3rd February 2010, 00:54
Guys the Johny Ray song was [JUST WALKIN IN THE RAIN] great thread Tony

Alan Rawlinson
3rd February 2010, 08:49
Hee you go....Click and enjoy...TC

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2xxJyMtyMgw

For all you (us!) Isa lei fans, the more authentic and haunting version by a Tongan Group can be heard at

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8XhJnISIMWs

There are a few versions, but the Tongan one has had 43,000 plays, and instantly brings back the island atmosphere. There are a few interesting comments also from people with memories, often as they were leaving one of the ports...........

rcraig
3rd February 2010, 10:25
Yokohama in the sixties,

"She ain't got no Yo-yo"

There is always someone to lower the intellectual standards! Mine are all romantic memories. Of course!

rcraig
3rd February 2010, 10:30
I was the recipient of a good hiding in the smugglers bar in Durban many years ago when I was persuaded to burst into song, title of which was 'there are twnty thousand b......s in the old Transvaal and theres room for twenty thousand more'.
The drink of choice was Cape Brandy, 110% high octane and NOT to be indulged in by anyone who had a normal constitution. I was still learning!
On very painful hindsight this was not a good thing, but being young and very pissed I was bullet, bomb, dust and waterproof at the time. Alas I was not proof against a good thumping. My own fault.
On a happier note we will all remember what was affectionately known as the "Bank Line Beat"! A slow monotonous foot thumping to any and all music, especially when drink had been taken.
Happy days. (Pint)

The only bit I remember now is:
"There were 20,000 b......s in the old Transvaal,
But none at El Alamein...",
but I didn't have your courage, however inspired.

Billieboy
3rd February 2010, 11:02
There is always someone to lower the intellectual standards! Mine are all romantic memories. Of course!

Well, of course; I was young and innocent too, in those days.

Charlie Stitt
3rd February 2010, 14:41
Although ISA LEI is a Fijian farewell song, the first time I had the pleasure of hearing it, was in Nukualofa Tonga in 1957. It was more the version as in Alan's reply,(Hippy) however the seekers make a good job of it as in JTC's reply. John, I looked through Youtube as you suggested, both these versions are on it, along with some really pathetic versions concocted for the gullible tourists, What a shame.

Oh yes, I'm the great pretender.
Answer me Lord above.

Joe C
3rd February 2010, 15:05
"Why do Foohools fall in Luhuv",Victoria Barracks Singapore,mid fifties.
We met up with some squaddies and went back to their Naafi where the juke box must have been stuck,I think it was sung by Frankie Lymon,again and again.

Charlie Stitt
3rd February 2010, 15:35
''Rave On'' must have been No1 around Sept 1956. I joined the Westbank then and remember the Senior Appy, who was a bit of a raver himself, hammer his guitar and belt out'' Rave On.''(Whaaa) I was happy when he got a transfere soon after joining us.

jimthehat
3rd February 2010, 15:38
The most stirring song was the one sung by king billy and his crew as they paddled us ashore at great speed in Apia.Also when we were at anchor off nukualofa we could hear the haunting music coming from the party in the town green where Queen salote was entertaining the queen and philip,think it was end of Dec 1953 ,I was first trip app on the maplebank.
jim

rcraig
3rd February 2010, 16:03
Definitely "Answer me", together with Jo Stafford in "You belong to me"..."Fly the ocean in a silver plane, see the jungle when it's wet with rain...." whilst smelling the jungles of Borneo 30 miles off the coast.

jimthehat
3rd February 2010, 16:14
Listening to all those 50s favourites blaring out fr radio LM whilst on the 8-12 sailing down the sa coast on the Isipingo/Clydebank.

jim

JoeQ
3rd February 2010, 16:32
1978, maiden voyage o the LAGANBANK, Crystal Gale sing "Don't You Make My Brown Eyes Blue" in Pat O'Brians in NOLA. Happy daze, engieer cadet deciding to take all his clothes off and being chased down Burbon Street by a copper

Johnnietwocoats
3rd February 2010, 19:05
Although ISA LEI is a Fijian farewell song, the first time I had the pleasure of hearing it, was in Nukualofa Tonga in 1957. It was more the version as in Alan's reply,(Hippy) however the seekers make a good job of it as in JTC's reply. John, I looked through Youtube as you suggested, both these versions are on it, along with some really pathetic versions concocted for the gullible tourists, What a shame.

Oh yes, I'm the great pretender.
Answer me Lord above.

Hi Charlie:
As you say I posted all versions. I particularly like Alans version as I sent you.
I was great that the seekers did it as they put it the words in English.
I have to say why I like the Tongan version. Got to do with a lovely young Tongan girl whose Mum introduced us.
Straw hut and Guitars and singers outside come to mind. I'll leave the rest to your imagination.
"Only the Lonely" was my song on the Eastbank in 1960.....
I still sing a bit in our band. Mostly Irish so the "Green Glens of Antrim" are dear to me as I was born in Glenarm.....
TC
(Smoke) (Smoke)

Alan Rawlinson
3rd February 2010, 21:55
The most stirring song was the one sung by king billy and his crew as they paddled us ashore at great speed in Apia.Also when we were at anchor off nukualofa we could hear the haunting music coming from the party in the town green where Queen salote was entertaining the queen and philip,think it was end of Dec 1953 ,I was first trip app on the maplebank.
jim

Apia was where I first heard Isa Lei, sung in a very soft and haunting way by locals whilst on board the Southbank. It was a great stay there, with lots of fraternisation ( I think it's called that) and the 2/0 going ' bush ' in a big way, - touch and go that he rejoined us for the onward voyage. He was ashore in a Lava Lava, looking very Samoan and at home.

Later ( circa 1981) I was offered a job as General Manager of Forum Line, based in Apia, with beach bungalow etc as part of the package. It was very tempting, but after a call home I reluctantly turned it down.

Abbeywood.
4th February 2010, 05:33
In 1967 on the Irisbank (1964 model) songs of choice were Adge Cutler and the Wurzel Mungels singing all the Somerset Cider songs. Boy, did we let rip when the R/O. Jim Halpin, put those records on. At some of the parties we had in Durban and Cape Town, the ladies looked on in amazement as we belted out the words to 'Pill, Pill, I love you Still' and 'Drink they Zider".

Boatlarnie

Hi Alan,
Bet you never taught them the words of 'the Pheasant Pluckers Song', also by the Wurzels.
Pete'

Alan Rawlinson
4th February 2010, 09:35
Come on you Far East / Japan regulars....

Talk about haunting melodies - what about the famous Shina No Yura ( China nights - to us). With the power of the internet, I managed to track it down at

http://www.youtube.com/v/qT8T3Shb8gU

Bar 9 of Hearts / Yokohama 1953 - (The girl's bar name was Mitzi) Oh, if only I could see her now. Well, maybe not!

Seems it started as a popular song with the Americans in the war .

Alistair Macnab
4th February 2010, 15:27
I have told this story before but under another heading.
We were in Shanghai at the Seafarers Center on the Bund. It was all very 'organized matey' with Chinese girls gushing about the fraternity of seafarers etc and brandishing Mao's Little Red Book.
There was a singalong organized and after a couple of Russian and Polish ships' companies had been induced to sing some ditty in their own language, the bright MC then declared "We now have our blothers from Glass-gow, Englan' from "Ettlickbann" who will give us a rendering of their national song".
We looked around our table.... One Scotsman, three Englishmen and four South Africans! The only song we all knew was Sari Marais in Afrikaans! (the English version was the extremely salacious one!) Anyway, we all did our party piece and got a round of applause. No doubt someone thought "My goodness! I didn't think English sounded like that!"

TonyAllen
4th February 2010, 19:06
What about Yokohama mama and what was the japanese shovel dance Tony

rcraig
4th February 2010, 22:29
Was that not the miners' song I mentioned earlier, "Tanko Bushi"? See it on Youtube.

"Sukina, data, data, sukinawa kama yoi, yoi (clap hands) or something like that?
No or "ni"?

IBlenkinsopp
5th February 2010, 08:46
Listening to radio L.M. in Durban in the '70's, B.T.O. 'You ain't seen nothing yet' and Grand Funk Railroad 'Some Kinda Wonderful' Happy Days.

Eddie B.

kwg
5th February 2010, 13:56
'Play House' Durban early 60's, who was the resident lady who played the organ, she used to be on UK TV in the late 50's. Was it Ruby Murry or some name like that?

McMorine
5th February 2010, 15:08
Don't remember who played the organ, but do remember the very high ceiling, which was black like the night sky and you could see all the stars. (Don't tell me it was the drink).

bri445
5th February 2010, 21:55
'Play House' Durban early 60's, who was the resident lady who played the organ, she used to be on UK TV in the late 50's. Was it Ruby Murry or some name like that?

Was it famous English organist Ena Baga? Great player of cinema and Hammond organs, she spent 1957-62 in S.Africa.
Bri

rcraig
5th February 2010, 22:32
Ruby Murray was an Irish singer who sang "Softly, Softly...dum, di, dum " Was she ever an organist? Don't think so.

John Dryden
5th February 2010, 23:10
Curry.Say no more!

Abbeywood.
6th February 2010, 13:07
Was it famous English organist Ena Baga? Great player of cinema and Hammond organs, she spent 1957-62 in S.Africa.
Bri

Could it have been Cherie Wainer who I believe was S.African and appeared on the ITV version of the 6-5 Special, with Lord Rockingham's XI

kwg
6th February 2010, 14:20
Could it have been Cherie Wainer who I believe was S.African and appeared on the ITV version of the 6-5 Special, with Lord Rockingham's XI

That's the lady, quick Google and recognised her straight away...Thanks

TonyAllen
6th February 2010, 15:39
Yes it was and she is alive and kicking in Las Vegas and has been there for the last 30 years with her husband Don who was the drummer in Lord rocks. sadly Don passed away 3 years ago. Cherry and Don were also in 6.5 special and in fact a lot of the ideas were Cherrys in that show even to the poodle on the top of the organ.The last time we worked with Cherry was in the TV studios in Germany with Jimmy Hendicks and he anialated a guitar on stage.Cherry had just released Boy from Iponema, ah those were the days and we email each often, she has remained a great friend.Regards Tony

Alistair Macnab
6th February 2010, 19:34
Yes... I remember she used to be used for 'interludes' between programmes when they had some TV time to fill (Probably because they hadn't sold some advertising time!) She could tickle the ivories of the organ big time and her entertainment value at the Playhouse in Durban was sufficient to draw us regularly back.
I used to bore my British friends when she popped up in TV with "I saw her in Durban!" Remember her husband too. He was rythm backup to her playing.

McMorine
9th February 2010, 13:15
Can't remember which Pacific Islands,maybe Fanning or Washington, but we would pick the shore labour up from one island and take them to another island. they would then go ashore and bring the copra out to the ship for loading. While we were sailing with the natives onboard, they would rig a tarp over the stowed derricks for their sleeping quarters and they would play their guitars and sing their native songs. It was great to listen to under a beautiful starlit sky.
Another memory is, when leaving Zamboanga in the Philippines. There was a very noisey bar at the end of the jetty and as we let the ropes go ready to sail, they were blasting out "Anchors Away"
Strange how some of these things are lodged in the memory forever!!!!!





11

david harrod
10th February 2010, 08:44
A Hard Day's Night did it for me...I remember seeing it in a movie house in BA and the tune has stuck ever since...

Alan Rawlinson
10th February 2010, 09:00
Leaving Balboa heading out for the long haul across the Pacific - dozens of US West coast stations would come flooding in for a few days - '' splish splash, I was taking a bath '' , '' He'll have to go '' '' Rubber Ball '' etc Guess this pins the date down as late 1950's !

Joe C
10th February 2010, 15:41
We were taught some strange Japanese "folk songs"and a little delve in the archives reminded me of "Oh Sho Joji"or similar, picked up in the Yokahama Bar!

Alan Rawlinson
26th February 2010, 08:24
Anyone remember the strange bars in the Argentine grain loading ports - B.A. Bahia Blanca, Ingenerio White etc , and the piano and player were on a platform halfway up the wall? There was a ladder which was difficult to negotiate, especially in the small hours, and it was easier to flick graphic pics up to the lady player! They usually featured over endowed excited Donkeys or similar in order to overcome the language barrier.

jimthehat
26th February 2010, 11:27
Only ever went to "May Sullivans on 25de Mayo,always gave you a little card which said "the first of june will be the last of "MAY"

jim

Calm C
26th February 2010, 18:13
How about "Its crying time again, you,ll soon be leaving", sung in innumerable bars round the world.
Sailed with a second mate called Tonto, from Liverpool, on the Inverbank, who could make up new, appropriate words to any song at the drop of a hat. The shipboard favourite was Otis Reading,s "Sitting on the dock of the Bay", altered to "Chipping on the boat deck all day, etc,etc"

Charlie Stitt
4th September 2010, 22:18
To those, who run down the good name of Andrew Weir's ''Bank Line''. I dedicate this song by Nancy Sinatra.
These boots are made for walking, That's just what they'll do, One of these days, these boots are goin to walk all over you. I liked this one when I heard it first around the US Gulf ports, late 50's early 60's.

pete
5th September 2010, 10:00
To those, who run down the good name of Andrew Weir's ''Bank Line''. I dedicate this song by Nancy Sinatra.
These boots are made for walking, That's just what they'll do, One of these days, these boots are goin to walk all over you. I liked this one when I heard it first around the US Gulf ports, late 50's early 60's.

Thankyou Charlie my thoughts entirely......................pete

rabaul
31st October 2010, 17:28
When I was with Bank Line in the mid seventies there was a rumour that the - two hit wonder , one man band singer Don Partridge has once been a apprentice in the company. His hits were 'Rosie' and ' Blue Eyes' both top 5 hits around 1968. He toured with Gene Pitney and was still performing up to about five years ago.
He was born in 1941 and if this rumour was true would have been at sea in the late 1950s. Can anyone tell me if this tale holds water. I only ask because I read of his death last month.

bbarr
31st October 2010, 18:55
Not too sure of the song title now, but remember so clearly the words
'My dearest, my darling, tomorrow is near,
The sun will bring flowers, but sadness, I fear.'
Sailing from Kure on the Asturius after 10 days in heaven!
Sad to see grown men cry. A favourite song in the bars
was 'Davy Crockett', or as the girls sang 'Davy Clocket'
Alas, I can still hear it somewhere in the recesses of my mind.

Ron Stringer
31st October 2010, 19:43
Not too sure of the song title now, but remember so clearly the words
'My dearest, my darling, tomorrow is near,
The sun will bring flowers, but sadness, I fear.'


Almost Tomorrow - The Dreamweavers

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BAe6uImyrr8

JoeQ
2nd November 2010, 14:45
When I was with Bank Line in the mid seventies there was a rumour that the - two hit wonder , one man band singer Don Partridge has once been a apprentice in the company. His hits were 'Rosie' and ' Blue Eyes' both top 5 hits around 1968. He toured with Gene Pitney and was still performing up to about five years ago.
He was born in 1941 and if this rumour was true would have been at sea in the late 1950s. Can anyone tell me if this tale holds water. I only ask because I read of his death last month.

Don Partridge's obituary in this mornings Daily Telegraph, no mention of him ever being at sea

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/obituaries/culture-obituaries/music-obituaries/8102963/Don-Partridge.html

Alan Rawlinson
3rd November 2010, 10:03
" Those were the days, my friend,
We thought they'd never end,
Sing and dance for ever and a day,
Live the life we choose,
Fight and never lose,
For we were young, and sure to have our way......


Dedicated to all those who sailed happily on the Bank Line long voyages..

( Grateful thanks to Mary Hopkins)

Alan Rawlinson
11th January 2011, 19:08
To all the old ex Bank Line officers who loved music....

Try entering ' David Lobban' on ' spotify ' or ' groove shark ' to hear some fantastic stuff...

Happy listening......

Would be interested in feedback

BASHER
13th January 2011, 16:41
Southbank 1959 we had skiffle group under the direction of Sugar Reeves S App Basher Green App and Bill Beavis App Aperson came on board in Soloman Island Sumarai [i think] and asked if we could place on Sat night.OK we arrived and were asked to play dinner music Sugar wen:t a funny colour and said yes, we did not know any such music,anyway we managedto tone things down and the evening
continued with us being plied with lots of VB for our efforts and this combined with everything else made for a very good evening i wonder if anyone else had a similar experience??

What happended to Sugar Reeves i don:t know but i think that Bill Beavis when:t on to Union Castle then on to Trinity House and finally

Editing a Yachting Mag but that is the last heard, Anymore news anyone?

BASHER Peter Green HAYLING ISLAND

Alistair Macnab
13th January 2011, 17:41
Like many others I was an avid listener to LM Radio whenever I was in the Indian Ocean. We used to vie with each other on the ship as to who would pick it up first. It was, of course, in english and played the sort of music that young people wanted to hear and which the government-controlled South African Radio didn't want to play.

Nevertheless, from time to time there would be a programme of what I suppose was 'South African Country Music' in Africaans with accordion playing. I was told that this was 'tiki drei' (sp?) music. It reminded me of church hall dances in rurual Ayrshire when I was a boy where a 'country band' with accordion would play for dancing Gay Gordons, Petronella, Dashing White Sargeant, Highland Scottisch, Eightsom Reel and other square dances. We even had Jimmy Shand one time brought in at great expense!

The South African accordion music was a bit monotinous but nevertheless brought back memories of home as a two-year trip wore on.

Hamish Mackintosh
13th January 2011, 19:21
Alistair you can bring back a few memories if you tune into BBC Scotland, go to "Take The Floor" or if you prefer pipe music then tune into"pipeline"

Alan Rawlinson
14th January 2011, 09:15
Like many others I was an avid listener to LM Radio whenever I was in the Indian Ocean. We used to vie with each other on the ship as to who would pick it up first. It was, of course, in english and played the sort of music that young people wanted to hear and which the government-controlled South African Radio didn't want to play.

Nevertheless, from time to time there would be a programme of what I suppose was 'South African Country Music' in Africaans with accordion playing. I was told that this was 'tiki drei' (sp?) music. It reminded me of church hall dances in rurual Ayrshire when I was a boy where a 'country band' with accordion would play for dancing Gay Gordons, Petronella, Dashing White Sargeant, Highland Scottisch, Eightsom Reel and other square dances. We even had Jimmy Shand one time brought in at great expense!

The South African accordion music was a bit monotinous but nevertheless brought back memories of home as a two-year trip wore on.

Alistair,

I remember the S African ' Africaans' music well, with its lively beat and distinctive accordion sound. Enjoyed it a lot.

What I had in mind when starting this thread was the truly unique experience we all had in the Bank Line, moving around the world as we did, and sampling all the local musical fare - something which never fades. A snatch of music today might easily conjur up some part of the globe visited many moons ago!

Today, of course, there are ' streaming ' internet music sites, offering all the memories. 'Spotify' is one of the best, and ' Groove shark ' is another. Searching can be tricky ( as with google) and it's necessary to hit on the right title or artist, and change it around a bit until you get the required music. The results can be pure magic!

bri445
15th January 2011, 12:59
Like many others I was an avid listener to LM Radio whenever I was in the Indian Ocean. We used to vie with each other on the ship as to who would pick it up first. It was, of course, in english and played the sort of music that young people wanted to hear and which the government-controlled South African Radio didn't want to play.



Here's some more on LM Radio, taken from a short wave listening booklet which I bought in Liverpool in 1949. There is no publication date. Do you remember also Radio Brazzaville, French Equatorial Africa, also had English programmes? Possibly slightly before your era!
Not much SW listening is done these days!

Bri

Joe C
15th January 2011, 15:12
Here's some more on LM Radio, taken from a short wave listening booklet which I bought in Liverpool in 1949. There is no publication date. Do you remember also Radio Brazzaville, French Equatorial Africa, also had English programmes? Possibly slightly before your era!
Not much SW listening is done these days!

Bri

Remember listening to BBC short wave, broadcasting a Scotland/England international football match which faded out whenever a goal was threatened,you can imagine the comments!

kwg
15th January 2011, 16:09
Middle of Pacific Fleetbank 1960, C/E angrily pokes his head into all the Apps & Mates accom. Everyone listening to the same music. At dinner still raving in the dinning saloon, "only those on the boat deck can get good reception on their radio's and I want to know why"

He didn't calm down until Sparks offered to wire his radio speakers to his tape recorder along with the boat deck accom.

Alan Rawlinson
15th January 2011, 19:02
Like many others I was an avid listener to LM Radio whenever I was in the Indian Ocean. We used to vie with each other on the ship as to who would pick it up first. It was, of course, in english and played the sort of music that young people wanted to hear and which the government-controlled South African Radio didn't want to play.

Nevertheless, from time to time there would be a programme of what I suppose was 'South African Country Music' in Africaans with accordion playing. I was told that this was 'tiki drei' (sp?) music. It reminded me of church hall dances in rurual Ayrshire when I was a boy where a 'country band' with accordion would play for dancing Gay Gordons, Petronella, Dashing White Sargeant, Highland Scottisch, Eightsom Reel and other square dances. We even had Jimmy Shand one time brought in at great expense!

The South African accordion music was a bit monotinous but nevertheless brought back memories of home as a two-year trip wore on.

I gather from a bit of research that this was called ' Boere Musiek ' and relied heavily on the concertina. ( strangely, there seems to be a link with the French Cajun style of Louisiana - maybe from the European home countries way back in the past) The common theme is something called Zydeco style( You can tell I am way out of my depth here!) One of the present exponents is a Guy called Manie Erasmus who can be found on online music sites.

Are there any Dutch or Afrikaans members who can put a more specific name to the old 1950's concertina band music?

Whilst looking this up, I ran across the very interesting LM radio website with programmes and Bio's of the staff. Sadly, all the old announcers seem to be dying off.

Johnnietwocoats
17th January 2011, 04:43
Here is Paul Simon bringing back the music...


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OafqYNCzq5U

Or this...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jqrKejQTynk

Joe C
11th February 2011, 12:24
Boppy Bethel and his trumpet on the Irisbank! Probably the wrong thread. It's headed "musical memories"

Lefty
17th May 2011, 00:43
I have recollections of various bits of music whilst sailing with Bank Line. There was the little ditty "Tora chinny tora char Bombay Baby bord acha!" on the Indian Coast. On the Eastbank with johnnytwocoats we had a piper called Neil Angus MacDonald MacRaild who led us into some fine nights ashore in the islands and on the African coast. I remember one piece called "The Barren Rocks of Aden" but "Scotland the Brave" was rather overplayed! Christmas Day at Kavieng he led a mottle crew to a very welcoming RSA Club!
Sailing around the Solomons with the local lads aboard was good for music too. They had a lot of tunes remembered from the war.
N.Angus Mac D MacRaild once came back to the ship with a very thickened head in New Orleans. Lonnie Donegan was all the rage and a tune about beating the Bloody British at the battle of New Orleans. Angus took offence when the locals kept putting it on the juke box! His thick head was the result of being hit over the head with the bar man's flapjack! Before you rush for your querty it was Angus who got it wrong not me!
Then there was the time in Auckland where we found ourselves in Ma Gleesons and the two Irish lads, when their turn came to sing, sang the SASH!!! End of a good night.
....and with that I'll turn in too! Lefty

pete
17th May 2011, 11:02
A somewhat poingnant memory for me was on the Dartbank with an apprentice named Jerry Parsons. I joined in 1967 and the first sound was “Light my fire” by the Doors coming from the Cadets Cabin. This was Jerry, a really nice guy who would attempt anything he was asked to do.
Sadly when he arrived home after the voyage (His parents lived in Italy) He jumped into a bath and died of a Heart Attack. He was only 19 and whenever I hear that number the memories come pouring back. (Like when he hosing down the Deck outside the OM’s Cabin one afternoon and the bedroom porthole was open...Oops).......pete

China hand
17th May 2011, 19:35
That Geordie Chief Engineer, who, when encouraged with an ale or two, would burst forth with ( in a surprisingly good voice):-

I love a lassie.
A lassie from Madrasi.
She's as black as the very knobs of hell.
Oh she cleans her teeth with charcoal and she sugis out her ********, and she draws up tunda pani from the well.

Now if you meet this lassie,
This great big black madrasi,
You can tell her from me that all is well.
Ever since I left Calcutta my knobend drips like butter,
Allaesalaam and fair thee well.

He would then bow majestically, and bumble away, mumbling things about the good old days.

IBlenkinsopp
18th May 2011, 08:45
Must get the students to sing that at our next school show, it will bring the house down

Eddie B

HM Sinclair
30th June 2011, 18:15
I recall one of our engineers purchasing an LP in the States entitled Bawdy Ballads or something similar. The songs were sung in a Lonnie Donegan type style and it was surprising that such a record was on general sale in the 1960s. Among the dozen or so tracks were quite a few with a nautical theme such as "Frigging in the Rigging" while others like "The Woodpecker's Hole" were more familiar. I'd love to find a copy but have drawn a blank, even on the internet.

I remember one of the verses which gives you an idea of the general type of humour of the record:

There was a young lady called Alice
Used a dynamite stick for a phallus
They discovered her quim
On the Grand Canyon rim
And her ass in a suburb of Dallas.

Great fun..

Ron Stringer
30th June 2011, 22:56
Was a favourite with a 2/E that I sailed with. Just a couple of words were different.


I love a lassie.
A lassie from Madrasi.
She's as black as the very hobs of hell.
Oh she cleans her teeth with charcoal and she sugis out her ********, as she draws up tunda pani from the well.

Alan Rawlinson
6th September 2011, 18:12
Like many others I was an avid listener to LM Radio whenever I was in the Indian Ocean. We used to vie with each other on the ship as to who would pick it up first. It was, of course, in english and played the sort of music that young people wanted to hear and which the government-controlled South African Radio didn't want to play.

Nevertheless, from time to time there would be a programme of what I suppose was 'South African Country Music' in Africaans with accordion playing. I was told that this was 'tiki drei' (sp?) music. It reminded me of church hall dances in rurual Ayrshire when I was a boy where a 'country band' with accordion would play for dancing Gay Gordons, Petronella, Dashing White Sargeant, Highland Scottisch, Eightsom Reel and other square dances. We even had Jimmy Shand one time brought in at great expense!

The South African accordion music was a bit monotinous but nevertheless brought back memories of home as a two-year trip wore on.

This music genre can be found on SPOTIFY by typing in boeremusiek and then scrolling through the various artists and tunes - it brought back memories for me. Definitely my INCHANGA time, with Johny Ray and Jim Reeves !!!

Ian Harrod
7th September 2011, 02:21
Reading this thread, who could ever say that we lacked kulcha?

Not just songs, there was even the Doxford dance. Usually spoiled by a swinging chainblock. (In the smokeroom.)

Johnnietwocoats
7th September 2011, 05:31
I have recollections of various bits of music whilst sailing with Bank Line. There was the little ditty "Tora chinny tora char Bombay Baby bord acha!" on the Indian Coast. On the Eastbank with johnnytwocoats we had a piper called Neil Angus MacDonald MacRaild who led us into some fine nights ashore in the islands and on the African coast. I remember one piece called "The Barren Rocks of Aden" but "Scotland the Brave" was rather overplayed! Christmas Day at Kavieng he led a mottle crew to a very welcoming RSA Club!
Sailing around the Solomons with the local lads aboard was good for music too. They had a lot of tunes remembered from the war.
N.Angus Mac D MacRaild once came back to the ship with a very thickened head in New Orleans. Lonnie Donegan was all the rage and a tune about beating the Bloody British at the battle of New Orleans. Angus took offence when the locals kept putting it on the juke box! His thick head was the result of being hit over the head with the bar man's flapjack! Before you rush for your querty it was Angus who got it wrong not me!
Then there was the time in Auckland where we found ourselves in Ma Gleesons and the two Irish lads, when their turn came to sing, sang the SASH!!! End of a good night.
....and with that I'll turn in too! Lefty

Hi Lefty...Hope you are well....

Over 51 years since we signed on the Eastbank...

Paddy is dead..

I also remember Rob Todd (Electrician) teaching me "The Road to Dundee" and the "Hiking Song" both of which we still sing to this day in our band here in White Rock Canada...

Johnny

Alan Rawlinson
18th November 2011, 18:01
I just wanted to say that for any ex Bankliners that loved their music, and particularly musical memories, there is no substitute for capturing the days spent in various countries in the Bankline, than the music. Not everyone will be familiar with the internet site called ' Spotify ' but it is a treasure of memories for me. Argentine Tangos, Pacific Island tunes, Pop songs, or whatever, it is all there for free. For those prepared to search the files - there are some magic memories that conjure up happy days....

I hope this will be useful for some.

For the boys that enjoyed the Pacific islands, try tapping in Isa lei. There are quite a few versions, but the one called Isa Lei2 is the best for me.

Aberdonian
19th November 2011, 12:59
For me, listening to the Peruvian Yma Sumac or the French Caterina Valente (“Malaguena”), whilst heading across a wintry South Atlantic towards Montevideo in the mid-50s, tops the musical nostalgia bill.

Aberdonian
20th November 2011, 15:52
I just wanted to say that for any ex Bankliners that loved their music, and particularly musical memories, there is no substitute for capturing the days spent in various countries in the Bankline, than the music. Not everyone will be familiar with the internet site called ' Spotify ' but it is a treasure of memories for me. Argentine Tangos, Pacific Island tunes, Pop songs, or whatever, it is all there for free. For those prepared to search the files - there are some magic memories that conjure up happy days....

I hope this will be useful for some.

For the boys that enjoyed the Pacific islands, try tapping in Isa lei. There are quite a few versions, but the one called Isa Lei2 is the best for me.

Alan, you have exceeded your PM quota therefore some space must be made before further messages can be received.

Aberdonian

Alan Rawlinson
20th November 2011, 17:04
Alan, you have exceeded your PM quota therefore some space must be made before further messages can be received.

Aberdonian

Hi Keith,

Sorted now, and apologies for the mix up on messages - I didn't realise we had swopped notes back in Sept - talking about our mutual board of trade acquaintance - John Arundel.

The only Arabic musical memory I have is a catchy tune called ' Habibi ' which would get the locals all excited!

Cheers/Alan

Alan Rawlinson
14th December 2011, 10:22
Hi Keith,

Sorted now, and apologies for the mix up on messages - I didn't realise we had swopped notes back in Sept - talking about our mutual board of trade acquaintance - John Arundel.

The only Arabic musical memory I have is a catchy tune called ' Habibi ' which would get the locals all excited!

Cheers/Alan

Seems the popular music site 'spotify' have now linked with ' facebook ' which is bad news for those of us that keep off facebook!

The alternative worth looking at , which does not require registration etc is ' grooveshark' . Daft name, but it is a good way of recalling those memorable tunes from Bankline days. An island song called ' Tangata ' does it for me.

Hope this is useful

Cheers

Norman Best
14th December 2011, 17:20
What a fantastic thread,have just spent a very pleasant hour reading through the 4 pages,can't wait for more. Cheers Norman Best (Trunch).