Storing slide film

gordy
2nd February 2010, 10:21
A question for the experienced!

I'm working my way through my old slides now that I have worked out how my scanner deals with them.

Most of the slides are in cardboard mounts which have to be split open to get the film into the scanner attachment.

Is it worth buying mounts that open easily to remount them, or do folks store them in negative sheets?

Gordy

gaelsail
2nd February 2010, 10:31
A question for the experienced!

I'm working my way through my old slides now that I have worked out how my scanner deals with them.

Most of the slides are in cardboard mounts which have to be split open to get the film into the scanner attachment.

Is it worth buying mounts that open easily to remount them, or do folks store them in negative sheets?
I'm not sure of the direct answer to your question however, I thought it worth adding something I discovered. I recently scanned a lot of slides and found the quality varied considerably even though the slides were of a similar age.

The slides that had been stored in the purpose made wooden boxes had deteriorated considerably while those stored in plastic boxes had survived much better.

David W
2nd February 2010, 10:53
Gordy,
I am far from being any kind of expert on these matters, but my experience with scanning my own slides, is, first of all do you really need to take the film from the mount. I use an Epson flat bed scanner, and the attachment allows me to scan 4 slides at a time, still in their mounts.
On the matter of how to store them, if you do have to remove the mount, I think it would be better to remount them in the readily available, easy open mounts, if for no other reason than ease of handling.
And in response to Gaelsail, I have found that a lot of slides that look perfectly good when viewed as such, do not scan well, quite often a very strong blue cast is apparent. I used mostly Agfa slides, other people tell me Fuji tends to a green cast, probably other products have their own variations.

K urgess
2nd February 2010, 11:24
I have a stock of GePe and Boots slide mounts that I use to remount old slides with split mounts. Those are the ones with the plastic body, metal film holder and glass protection. Only trouble is that they must be squeaky clean.
Best advice is to scan all slides as best you can and then it doesn't matter what happens to the originals.
I've found that most of mine have stood the test of time very well. One thing that shows up are rainbow marks from left over washing solution where the processor hasn't been very careful. Even faded or colour changed slides can be repaired very satisfactorily with today's scanning technology.
Whereas most of my negatives have become scratched even if left in original sleeves and not touched since developed.

borderreiver
2nd February 2010, 11:37
I am presently scanning 35mm film neg.110mm neg.16mm neg. 2 and half inch slides,120film neg black and white some 70 years old. and 35 mm slides.
so far the 16mm neg are very difficult and I have sent some to a firm that scan these so far they have not been allowed in the gallery as being too small.
35mm slides as these for my family go into 1000 of them I have used a daily telgrath slide scanner which is very good. but when I have found a slide that content is very good I then scan on my flat bed scanner. again they are too large for the gallery so have to reduce size .

K urgess
2nd February 2010, 11:39
As a postscript most of my slides are stored in Plastic slide boxes in projector magazines.
Not that I have a projector any more. (Sad)

gaelsail
2nd February 2010, 11:51
As a postscript most of my slides are stored in Plastic slide boxes in projector magazines.
Not that I have a projector any more.
Strange that, neither do I but somehow I don't feel like throwing the slides away.

pensioner
2nd February 2010, 12:07
Just to add my two-penneth, with my slides I have found that I get a better result by projecting them onto a screen, take their photo on Digital camera, Use a Photo editing suite and then store to file. I know its tedious but that's the way I find best.

Rgds.

benjidog
2nd February 2010, 19:26
The software with my scanner allows you to select the make of film used and this automatically compensates for differences - though it does not always get it right. A bit of experimentation with your particular slides and selecting different film types (even if not the right one) should allow you to get a decent colour compensation to lose the cast. Failing that, most scanners come with free software that allow you to make adjustments after you have completed the scan.

gadgee
2nd February 2010, 21:49
Gordy
You should not need to split any slides open to scan them.Definitely a NO NO!! My Canoscan 4200 allows you to insert the slides in either their original cardboard or plastic mounts. I have hundreds of colour slides which I took starting in the mid 1960's. They have always been stored at room temperature in plastic boxes. I always used Agfa colour slide film and when they were processed, they came in their own plastic storage box. These I have kept over the years and degradation of the film has been absolutely minimal.

gordy
2nd February 2010, 23:39
9 replies in 12 hours! No wonder this site is so popular.(Thumb)

I'm beginning to think storing the slides after scanning in ring binder holders might be the preferred option.

I did try scanning with the slides still in mounts, but the results were poor.
My scanner is an inexpensive CanoScan LiDE 500F, and I am embarrassed to say I only found the attachments to do the job a few days ago at the bottom of a drawer after having had the m/c 5 years! The attachment is for 35mm film and there is also a thing called FARE, Film Automatic Retouching and Enhancement unit which you put over the slide or film frame you are doing. This presses the film against the scanner bed. I thought the first attempts were poor because the mount was holding the slide a few thou' off the bed.
It's all a bit trial and error to get the best dpi results too.
I also have to keep reminding myself that a 1st trip juniors camera wasn't likely to be top quality!

Once again thanks for the help and suggestions.

Stand by for more 'Gordy, the early years' shots. (Hippy)

benjidog
2nd February 2010, 23:55
You really need to scan at 2,400 dpi or higher for 35mm stock or you won't get any details. How far to go beyond this though is down to the quality of the photos - if they are not that great it is probably not worth going any more detailed than that.

Be very careful about storage. As Gadgee says - use the original boxes if possible. Be careful to store them so that nothing touches the surface of the slides (not the frames). Any storage media could contain chemicals that will damage the slides.

Finally, please keep the slides rather than dumping them just in case you have a computer problem. And in any case make lots of backups of the scanned photos onto CDs or DVDs just in case.

andysk
3rd February 2010, 16:01
I echo what Brian says, scan at the highest res you can, then back up, back up and even make a back up. I would suggest on a variety of media, DVD or CD, memory stick, portable hard drive etc

Then keep the slides in their original boxes, or if that isn't possible get some Archive quality slide storage file pages, either Clearfile or Arrowfile, and keep these in ring binders. Archival quality PVC, has no funny chemicals that can leach out onto the slides unlike the sort of file pockets you get from the stationers.

Whatever you do, please don't bin the slides ! If you haven't the room to keep them, I'm sure the WSS would appreciate them for their Chatham archive, especially if they are labeled and dated.

Cheers

Andy

(Added Later) I have an Epson 4990, does 8 slides in original mounts at a time, takes about 55 minutes at the highest res which is enough time in the morning to do everything I need to do before leaving for work !

AGAMEMNON
3rd February 2010, 16:16
Zennox negative & slide scanner does the job via "photo impression"
Phone 0871 911 7033
e: cservice@bvg-airflo.co.uk
I bought mine through mail order. About 60

gaelsail
3rd February 2010, 16:38
Zennox negative & slide scanner does the job via "photo impression"
Phone 0871 911 7033
e: cservice@bvg-airflo.co.uk
I bought mine through mail order. About 60
Taking this thread just a bit further... it is worth cleaning your computer screen before you start to edit the slides. It isn't the first time I've found myself removing 'dust and scratches' from the scanned images only to find they were actually on the screen.

gordy
3rd February 2010, 21:47
Thanks shipmates for all the help and advice.

I nearly ordered GePe's on line today, got to the end of the process and postage was to be 7+(Cloud).

Have now had the call to look after 'no weel' granddaughter tomorrow in Glasgow, so I can sneek off to Jessops and get them.(Thumb)

bobw
4th February 2010, 10:56
Taking this thread just a bit further... it is worth cleaning your computer screen before you start to edit the slides. It isn't the first time I've found myself removing 'dust and scratches' from the scanned images only to find they were actually on the screen.
If you have a flat screen (lcd) then only clean it with a damp cloth. Never use Windex or any other glass cleaner as these screens are plastic not glass. That goes for your television also. (Better tell the wife!)

K urgess
4th February 2010, 11:35
Being a bit rural around here we suffer from harvest bugs around September time.
One of the little bug....s has managed to get into my flat screen and I still get caught out when cleaning up scans wondering why the mark won't go no matter what I do. (Sad)

andysk
9th February 2010, 23:27
Hi Gordy,

and everybody erse with slide storage interest !

I Googled "clearfile" tonight to see if they were still available on the UK, and found this place :

http://www.britnett-carver.co.uk/javerette/index.html

Click on 'Clearfile slide storage' on the left hand side, and you will see the range. The ones I have used in the past are Type 20B, available at 4.80 for a pack of 25, that is enough for 12 films. P&P is a bit high, but if you can get a big enough order (amalgamate with others ?)

Jessops and one of the Channel Island companies (7dayshop or mx2) used to do them but I think no more ...

Cheers

Andy

Jim McFaul
10th February 2010, 09:23
I have found over the years that the make of film is as influential as the storage media on their ongoing quality. Kodak are the best with very little if any degradation after forty years, closely followed by Agfa and Fuji. Some of the other film available in the sixties and seventies can deteriorate very badly even if stored in the same conditions. I get really depressed when looking at old Gefa, Perutz, Ilford, etc. slides where they have either gone deep maroon or started to fade. If you have any of these you should try and get them scanned as soon as you can to preserve the image.

If at all possible don't remove the slides from their mounts, even with the best care damage can still occur. If you have a lot of slides it's best to get a dedicated 35mm/slide scanner. One big plus is that the included software with most of them can make a really pink and scratched slide almost like new, the transformation with a few very simple tweaks can be amazing.

Can only endorse Andysk's earlier comment, if you have scanned your slides to make some space, please, please don't throw the slides away when you have finished, the WSS will gladly take them into their archive and look after them. Jim.

sandy1000
10th February 2010, 10:01
I have a HP Photosmart C7180 All-in-One which allows the scanning of slides 4at a time. It is pretty slow but a steady program ensures that they eventually get done. Some of my SE Asian slides were grossly over exposed and a mate is enhancing them for me. It is incredible just how a washed out photograph can be turned into a vibrant picture.

gordy
11th February 2010, 21:23
Hi shipmates,
thought I'd let you know things are progressing well.
I've been fiddling about with the scanner settings and am now getting some sharper looking digital copies.
I managed to clear out Jessops stock of mounts, 2 boxes = 40(Cloud)
After a lot of searching, on foot and web, I got more from this crowd, and very quickly (Thumb)
http://www.mailshotsuk.co.uk/acatalog/Online_Catalogue_GEPE_75.html