'T' Shirts

IBlenkinsopp
11th February 2010, 08:43
Hi Guys
Anyone still got their 'Bank Line do it world wide' T shirt?

kwg
11th February 2010, 14:58
Never came across Bank Line gear in my day, cap badges, ties or T-shirts etc. I do still have a bank line counterpane, seem to remember we apps were issued with new on one ship so we recycled the old and kept the new ones to take home. Also still have a couple Calcutta white heavy linen shirts (not saying I can still get into them though).

Joe C
11th February 2010, 18:03
Hi Guys
Anyone still got their 'Bank Line do it world wide' T shirt?

No but I've got my chipping goggles!

Andy Lavies
11th February 2010, 21:20
Chipping Goggles - you must have been a generation after me!
Andy

rcraig
12th February 2010, 01:24
Me too. Where's the mouse gone?

Donald McGhee
12th February 2010, 03:35
Bank Line, in common with many other "tramp ship companies" were not ones for T shirts as I recall, at least not in my days of the mid- late sixties. However, T shirts are a relatively new thing in the world of corporate gear etc. They didn't have a cap badge as far as I was aware; I certainly was never told about one nor did I ever see one worn by any of the officers, not that uniforms were a great thing anyway!
I have ordered one though, as a keepsake, but I guess they came about maybe in the 80's or on the White Ships? Any clues from you old Bankers?

IBlenkinsopp
12th February 2010, 08:42
The 'T' shirts were printed by Capt McKenzie out in PNG as a bit of fun, nothing to do with uniform.
Sadly I do have a Cap Badge (never used) a Blazer badge and old style tie.
For reasons which escape me I also have an Eagle Oil cap badge.
Ian Bl.

McMorine
12th February 2010, 13:08
Bank Line, in common with many other "tramp ship companies" were not ones for T shirts as I recall, at least not in my days of the mid- late sixties. However, T shirts are a relatively new thing in the world of corporate gear etc. They didn't have a cap badge as far as I was aware; I certainly was never told about one nor did I ever see one worn by any of the officers, not that uniforms were a great thing anyway!
I have ordered one though, as a keepsake, but I guess they came about maybe in the 80's or on the White Ships? Any clues from you old Bankers?
I do remember having a couple of Bank Line T-shirts in the '70s, don't remember where they were purchased. Long gone now. Also in the '70s, Bank Line started issuing cap badges and epaulettes, I think we got a new set every couple of years. Still have a couple of sets, never used the cap badges, used the standard Merchant Navy Badge.

Winebuff
12th February 2010, 19:05
Went to Sam Bass in Hull when I bought all my uniform, cap and greys - whites were phased out in the mid 70's in favor of grey shorts, long socks and shirts. Not nearly as smart as the whites but a lot easier to care for.
Always took the lot with me but only wore the cap in anger three times. Once on bridge watch through the Keil Canal, second time to a Mayor making ceremony in Google (mother in law's idea) and finally to my sisters wedding to a solider. Great I out ranked him.
Still got the cap badge somewhere, and the uniform is hanging up in the spare room. Doubt I will ever fit the 32" waist again - unless I am very ill.

Peter Smith
ex - 3/E 1984

John Dryden
12th February 2010, 19:17
I was the same,got a grant to buy the uniform and other items of clothing,had to pay it all back.Never wore it to get the benefit out of it though, it all changed in Calcutta and the tailors in Hull were out of a job!

Charlie Stitt
12th February 2010, 19:47
I bought a Bank Line cap badge and blazer badge in Calcutta in 1956, mind you they tarnished, in fact the so called gold wire they were made off, went black in a short period of time. Got what we paid for I suppose.

Alistair Macnab
13th February 2010, 19:01
I saw one or two Bank Line cap badges in the early 50s. The 'white streak of starvation' was in silver wire otherwise it was all in coloured thread. Myself, I always wore the "Bombay spread" Merchant Navy cap badge which I bought at Paisley's in Glasgow. There was no special White Ship rigs but all of us got white mess jackets and dress trousers made for us in Calcutta. Looked very spiffy as evening wear. There were two Bank Line ties: one with the houseflag in a garter ring in a lighter blue and one in a darker blue with the houseflag and '25' under it to denote the Stag Club. They were always too short for someone who measured a little bit more than he should around the circumference from the neck to the waist fore and aft!
I was always somewhat uniform minded and dressed according to the weather.
Haven't got a shred of any of it now. Lost or thrown out along the way after 40 years! In Calcutta, we used to put our personal touches on uniform gear like button down collars and athletic cut with tighter short sleeves just to look different as well as short shorts. Seems ridiculous now!

jimthehat
13th February 2010, 23:23
have still got a Bank line cap badge hidden away somewhere.Whilst on the isipingo we found out that RN officers were wearing white bush jackets ,they looked very snazy so every one from the old man down had sets made in calcutta in white and khaki.Also had mess kit and no 10s made up ,tho as 3rd mate never got the chance to wear them as my 8-12 watch started at 1830 to allow the mate time to get a shower and dress for dinner,of course that was in the days when we still had passengers.

jim

Donald McGhee
13th February 2010, 23:55
I saw one or two Bank Line cap badges in the early 50s. The 'white streak of starvation' was in silver wire otherwise it was all in coloured thread. Myself, I always wore the "Bombay spread" Merchant Navy cap badge which I bought at Paisley's in Glasgow. There was no special White Ship rigs but all of us got white mess jackets and dress trousers made for us in Calcutta. Looked very spiffy as evening wear. There were two Bank Line ties: one with the houseflag in a garter ring in a lighter blue and one in a darker blue with the houseflag and '25' under it to denote the Stag Club. They were always too short for someone who measured a little bit more than he should around the circumference from the neck to the waist fore and aft!
I was always somewhat uniform minded and dressed according to the weather.
Haven't got a shred of any of it now. Lost or thrown out along the way after 40 years! In Calcutta, we used to put our personal touches on uniform gear like button down collars and athletic cut with tighter short sleeves just to look different as well as short shorts. Seems ridiculous now!

I guess as the memories fade some of us (me especially) tend to hang on to our old gear as a memento. I still have my cap with the standard MN badge and have ordered a new Bank Line badge too, for my spare cap. I never throw anything away!
I want to make sure my grandsons have something tangible and have collected all sorts of memorabilia (my sextant, various photos etc) including a large handwritten ledger with all my "adventures". I guess I am not quite certifiable, but heading there rapidly!

Joe C
14th February 2010, 11:39
Chipping Goggles - you must have been a generation after me!
Andy

They spoiled us on the Fleetbank,electric chipping hammers and goggles! Pity I was only there for five weeks.Christmas 1957.

ozedev
24th February 2010, 11:08
Bank Line 'T' shirts were solely produced in Rabaul from 1976 - 1978.
It was JM's idea and Bury Street did not approve at first; but having seen the popularity of them even bought a couple of dozen which we shipped back to London. Others were shipped to the States and Durban when the Superintendents there heard about them.
Mike Carvosso in BP's arranged the manufacture with several local people and they were made in all sizes from baby size to XXXL.
They do seem indestructable as I still have two somewhere, back in the UK
R.I.P. - John Mackenzie - now sorely missed.
Ozedev

Alistair Macnab
24th February 2010, 14:57
I too, would like my name to be associated with the expressions of sadness that accompany the late Captain John Mackenzie. I last saw him and his wife, Mamie, at the Bank Line Reunion in , I think, 2004 and he appeared then to have lost his bounce. Though only a few years older than myself, it was as if the old John that we all knew and loved, had departed from his soul.
Anyhow, remembering the good times, before PNG, John was relieving superintendent in Calcutta and Durban and as can be expected, shook up those centres of conservatism more than somewhat. I never did sail with him, but those who did, unfailingly to a man, would sing high his praises as a seaman, administrator and all-round good guy. Ullapool is not the same place today; John was a recognised 'character' in the best sense. Many of us looked up to John as the embodyment of what we hoped to become.

Tad
24th February 2010, 16:02
I still have my "Do it World Wide T Shirt" Not in bad nick either. Intend getting a couple of copies made before it eventually disintegrates.

IBlenkinsopp
24th February 2010, 16:30
I paid off Weybank in PNG with appendicitis and then septicaemia, was in hospital for some time, Captain McKenzie and the BP agent were intstrumental in making sure I was well cared for, for that I owe him a great debt.

Eddie Bl.

Donald McGhee
24th February 2010, 21:38
I,ve just purchased a "new" Bank Line cap badge Looks to be good quality and I have it on an old bargees cap sitting on top of the binnacle in my office.
A constant reminder of the good old days eh?

Lest we forget. Bring out your memorabilia, the loft is no place for items relating to what was a great time and one no one will ever experience again.

country Captain
25th February 2010, 09:21
I'm not a Bank Line man, I only sailed with blue chip companies.
Once sailed with an ex Bank Line Electrical Officer who sported a T Shirt with the slogan, "VD is F**K All to Clap About". Apparently this was to impress american missionaries on way to work in New Guniea. A Bank Line class act.

McMorine
25th February 2010, 12:09
I,ve just purchased a "new" Bank Line cap badge Looks to be good quality and I have it on an old bargees cap sitting on top of the binnacle in my office.
A constant reminder of the good old days eh?

Lest we forget. Bring out your memorabilia, the loft is no place for items relating to what was a great time and one no one will ever experience again.

My cap has been hanging in the conservatory for years, waiting to go on top of my coffin when I cross the "Bar"

mackem
9th March 2010, 16:53
I had two T shirts, one, main colour was white and the other, main colour is Bank Line beige or 'buff' and both lasted for many years before an emabarassing beer belly got in the way.........wish I still had them.

As mentioned earlier, these T shirts were often seen and very popular for the guys on the South Pacific Islands run.

Alistair Macnab
9th March 2010, 18:04
Country Captain......
Whose controversial message I have ignored for many weeks thinking that someone else, perhaps more knowledgable than I, would respond, has nevertheless left two insults on the table that require response.
First of all, the idea of a blue chip shipping company has received some hard knocks over the past few years, and at least Bank Line survived longer than most, offering employment to those brave seafarers who were still loyal to their calling. Blue chip indeed! I cannot think of any other British shipping company that could have earned the description more than Weirs. Who kept British shipbuilding and engineering going when all else had fled?
Secondly, I cannot not will not believe that the T-shirt with the highly offensive message was ever a Bank Line or Captain Mackenzie product. Probably a knock-off by someone employed by a so -called blue chip company.

dick burrow
10th March 2010, 08:54
Country Captain......
Whose controversial message I have ignored for many weeks thinking that someone else, perhaps more knowledgable than I, would respond, has nevertheless left two insults on the table that require response.
First of all, the idea of a blue chip shipping company has received some hard knocks over the past few years, and at least Bank Line survived longer than most, offering employment to those brave seafarers who were still loyal to their calling. Blue chip indeed! I cannot think of any other British shipping company that could have earned the description more than Weirs. Who kept British shipbuilding and engineering going when all else had fled?
Secondly, I cannot not will not believe that the T-shirt with the highly offensive message was ever a Bank Line or Captain Mackenzie product. Probably a knock-off by someone employed by a so -called blue chip company. blue chip? my ar*e!

Johnnietwocoats
13th March 2010, 05:07
I'm not a Bank Line man, I only sailed with blue chip companies.
Once sailed with an ex Bank Line Electrical Officer who sported a T Shirt with the slogan, "VD is F**K All to Clap About". Apparently this was to impress american missionaries on way to work in New Guniea. A Bank Line class act.

Don't know who you are buddy but you are correct...."You are not a Bank Line man"

How do I know?...."Because you have no manners"

Now why don't you go away back to your "Blue Chip" Thread and entertain your "Blue Chip" buddies.

You take care now and God Bless.

Sincerely

Johnnietwocoats...A "Bank Line Sailor" first. Then I became an Officer......(Smoke)

Alan Rawlinson
13th March 2010, 08:22
I'm not a Bank Line man, I only sailed with blue chip companies.
Once sailed with an ex Bank Line Electrical Officer who sported a T Shirt with the slogan, "VD is F**K All to Clap About". Apparently this was to impress american missionaries on way to work in New Guniea. A Bank Line class act.

Hallo Country Captain, and welcome to the Bankline forum. Many thanks for a great contribution!

Do I detect a touch of envy in your words, though?

I have 2 good shipping friends who were BI and Blue Funnel respectively, and they openly wish they had the Bankline experience, so I do recognise the signs.

John Briggs
13th March 2010, 14:33
Hallo Country Captain, and welcome to the Bankline forum. Many thanks for a great contribution!

Do I detect a touch of envy in your words, though?

I have 2 good shipping friends who were BI and Blue Funnel respectively, and they openly wish they had the Bankline experience, so I do recognise the signs.

Alan,

I spent the years from cadet to second mate with BI and I loved it but I must admit that I always had a hankering to sail with Bank Line.

Got the tramp ship itch out of my system by joining the tramps out of Hong Kong.

Hamish Mackintosh
13th March 2010, 17:06
Country Captain......
Whose controversial message I have ignored for many weeks thinking that someone else, perhaps more knowledgable than I, would respond, has nevertheless left two insults on the table that require response.
First of all, the idea of a blue chip shipping company has received some hard knocks over the past few years, and at least Bank Line survived longer than most, offering employment to those brave seafarers who were still loyal to their calling. Blue chip indeed! I cannot think of any other British shipping company that could have earned the description more than Weirs. Who kept British shipbuilding and engineering going when all else had fled?
Secondly, I cannot not will not believe that the T-shirt with the highly offensive message was ever a Bank Line or Captain Mackenzie product. Probably a knock-off by someone employed by a so -called blue chip company.

Well said Alistair

Jim Cobban
13th March 2010, 17:21
I too, would like my name to be associated with the expressions of sadness that accompany the late Captain John Mackenzie. I last saw him and his wife, Mamie, at the Bank Line Reunion in , I think, 2004 and he appeared then to have lost his bounce. Though only a few years older than myself, it was as if the old John that we all knew and loved, had departed from his soul.
Anyhow, remembering the good times, before PNG, John was relieving superintendent in Calcutta and Durban and as can be expected, shook up those centres of conservatism more than somewhat. I never did sail with him, but those who did, unfailingly to a man, would sing high his praises as a seaman, administrator and all-round good guy. Ullapool is not the same place today; John was a recognised 'character' in the best sense. Many of us looked up to John as the embodyment of what we hoped to become.

My first trip to sea on the Crestbank in 1964 - Captain MacKenzie was first trip Master. I am very sorry to hear of his passing and can honestly say that for the next twenty years of my seagoing career I did not encounter a finer Captain and all round thorough gentleman, in all respects. RIP

country Captain
24th April 2010, 12:41
The good ship MV Blue Chip sailed uneasily in the confused swell, the steady thump of the Doxford was comforting to those on the Bridge, like a comprehensive insurance policy.
The mood on the Bridge was sombre and pensive but as a faint line of brightness began to illuminate the horizon the mood started to lift. It was relief rather than elation. Country Captain broke the silence, “ We’ve taken a bit of a mauling recently chaps but I think we’ve come out of it without too much lasting damage”.
The Bridge Management Team nodded agreement with their Captain who was ,at times, outspoken but beneth the bluff exterior had a heart of gold.
Hurricane MacNab had blown them badly off-course and it took quite a feat of seamanship to prevent the Blue Chip from running aground on Teeshirt Rocks. Teeshirt Rocks were similar to Lord Howe Island, rarely encountered but very unforgiving.
Two-coat Reef was equally dangerous its walls comprising of coral like polyps of Sharp Invective which would tear the bottom of any ship even one of rivited Motherwell Steel. However Two-coat had been last charted in the mid ‘60’s and could be navigated around with relative ease.
The confused swell was caused by a Shamal like wind, the Rawlinson. It was not particularly strong at the moment but Country Captain knew from experience that this was the most dangerous type of wind. It would veer and bite your bum when least expected.
Country Captain surveyed his BMT and thanked his luck that they all had served a traditional apprenticeship of practical seamanship underpinned with the necessary academics, a good british mix.
----------------------------------------------------------
My Post of 25 Feb 2010, whilst a true story, was probably meant to provoke a bit of controversy but at no time did it insinuate that Captain MacKenzie had anything at all to do with the offending garment.
Alistair MacNab and many others in Bank line held Captain MacKenzie in high esteem and we all have sailed with people whose example and advice has inspired us, Officers and Gentlemen.
In 1974 I was a Junior Engineer on the ss Texaco Frankfurt, a big heap of junk and a nightmare for all down below. The Master was John Campbell, of this parish, whose work ethic, example and general enthuaism ensured morale remained high despite the outrageous fortune of having Babcock boilers and FD Fans. Captain Campbell was a Bank Line man and ran an efficient and ‘Happy’ ship. Happiness all round.
I enjoy a bit of cut and thrust but apologise if anyone thinks I personalised the Post.

Alistair Macnab
24th April 2010, 17:46
country Captain.....

Your well-written rebuttal implies a superior intellect to we lowly Bank Line uneducated high school dropouts. The m.v."Blue Chip", whilst undoubtedly operated by a superior shipping company and manned by a superior seagoing staff whose very engineers impressed everyone with their advanced education even when pulling a Doxford piston and cleaning out scavenge blowers, sails over the boundless Main oblivious to the main function of their very being.....the necessity to make money and to keep the shippers happy.

A ship has one purpose only and that is to be a profitable venture for the owners. Alas! A 'blue chip' operation does not necessarily imply that. The ship's staff are afforded a measure of self-induced superiority with Mates unwilling to descend hold ladders to supervise stevedores and not required to do so as the stevedores were surely paid by the owners to do their job?

m.v."Blue Chip" looks pretty and the officers are always smartly turned out.
Its a pity that the ship and the shipping company that operated her was swept away along with the riff-raff (and possibly even before) when containers came along; containers, of course, being the brain child of "Blue Chip"s owners.

[Likewise a bit of satire in matching tongue-in-cheek style just to demonstrate that we recognize countryCaptain's ability to take as well as he gives!]

Alan Rawlinson
24th April 2010, 22:34
The very next morning, as dawn broke, and Country Captain down in his maple wood lined cabin, examined his navel, he realised all was not well..... Yes, the preplotted course was as bold as ever, The BMT was in order, even the BLT he had ordered for pre breakfast was eagerly anticipated, and of course, the schedule was as clear as ever. Barring storms, hurricanes, even Shamals, the good ship ' Blue Chip ' would dock in a UK port, on time, probably port side to, lines from the same leads etc. ( God help us, he thought, what would we do if a strange berth was offered - the trusty crew might be thrown in turmoil - might have to change the gangway over) He couldn't suppress a chuckle - that old Bankline ship they had overhauled on the 4 to 8 yesterday was chugging along fully loaded, but he fancied there had been a cloud of bugs in the wake, and a whiff of coconuts. Quite smart in a common sort of way, but was that a strange smell downwind from those funny little steel structures on deck? Also, the BMT seemed to consist only of a skinny little mate in shorts and a man on the bridge wing. What looked suspiciously like T shirts were flapping, drying in the wind. Good God, don't they have a laundry on there? Oh well, it takes all sorts. He couldn't help wondering what possessed sane men to sign on such ships, sailing all over the world, to many strange ports, spending days or even weeks in places like Yokohama, Buenos Aires, New Orleans, Sydney, or leisurely cruising the Pacific islands. etc. No shipboard job too difficult or taboo for those hearties. Must need a ' can do ' attitude, he reflected, and probably a knowledge of strum boxes and of course, it was imperative to know the bale space.

No, what was really worrying Country Captain was that edict from head office. He read it for the umteenth time. Quite a change was afoot. Who would have thought their owners, the 'Blue Arsh Shipping Company' would possibly agree to join forces with their arch rivals, the ' Royal box company Ltd' after decades fighting them for berths, cargo, and kudos. Seems the shipping world has gone mad. Still, things wern't too bad. His new command , still on the stocks in Korea, might have the strange name of Boxship number TBA. but what's in a name? There was a quiet knock on his cabin door and the steward padded in with his early morning tray - the crisp white lace doilies neatly surrounding the incongruous BLT. He sat back and listened to the reassuring soft boom boom of the engines - his mind drifted, and he caught himself humming bars from that haunting Pacific tune he had seen in a movie - what was it? Isa Lei? He mouthed a few lines from the Hollywood sanitised version

'' Now is the hour
For me to say goodbye

Soon we'll be sailing
Far across the sea ''






The good ship MV Blue Chip sailed uneasily in the confused swell, the steady thump of the Doxford was comforting to those on the Bridge, like a comprehensive insurance policy.
The mood on the Bridge was sombre and pensive but as a faint line of brightness began to illuminate the horizon the mood started to lift. It was relief rather than elation. Country Captain broke the silence, “ We’ve taken a bit of a mauling recently chaps but I think we’ve come out of it without too much lasting damage”.
The Bridge Management Team nodded agreement with their Captain who was ,at times, outspoken but beneth the bluff exterior had a heart of gold.
Hurricane MacNab had blown them badly off-course and it took quite a feat of seamanship to prevent the Blue Chip from running aground on Teeshirt Rocks. Teeshirt Rocks were similar to Lord Howe Island, rarely encountered but very unforgiving.
Two-coat Reef was equally dangerous its walls comprising of coral like polyps of Sharp Invective which would tear the bottom of any ship even one of rivited Motherwell Steel. However Two-coat had been last charted in the mid ‘60’s and could be navigated around with relative ease.
The confused swell was caused by a Shamal like wind, the Rawlinson. It was not particularly strong at the moment but Country Captain knew from experience that this was the most dangerous type of wind. It would veer and bite your bum when least expected.
Country Captain surveyed his BMT and thanked his luck that they all had served a traditional apprenticeship of practical seamanship underpinned with the necessary academics, a good british mix.
----------------------------------------------------------
My Post of 25 Feb 2010, whilst a true story, was probably meant to provoke a bit of controversy but at no time did it insinuate that Captain MacKenzie had anything at all to do with the offending garment.
Alistair MacNab and many others in Bank line held Captain MacKenzie in high esteem and we all have sailed with people whose example and advice has inspired us, Officers and Gentlemen.
In 1974 I was a Junior Engineer on the ss Texaco Frankfurt, a big heap of junk and a nightmare for all down below. The Master was John Campbell, of this parish, whose work ethic, example and general enthuaism ensured morale remained high despite the outrageous fortune of having Babcock boilers and FD Fans. Captain Campbell was a Bank Line man and ran an efficient and ‘Happy’ ship. Happiness all round.
I enjoy a bit of cut and thrust but apologise if anyone thinks I personalised the Post.

Ben Masey
25th April 2010, 16:54
The 'T' shirts were printed by Capt McKenzie out in PNG as a bit of fun, nothing to do with uniform.
Sadly I do have a Cap Badge (never used) a Blazer badge and old style tie.
For reasons which escape me I also have an Eagle Oil cap badge.
Ian Bl.

I once had the full order on my ship in PNG delivering them to Rabaul,several hundred as I remember.
My ex wife tells me she threw away my two some years ago.
All I have left is my Bank Line Golf Club tie and a pack of playing cards.
regards,
Ben Masey

McMorine
26th April 2010, 11:48
I once had the full order on my ship in PNG delivering them to Rabaul,several hundred as I remember.
My ex wife tells me she threw away my two some years ago.
All I have left is my Bank Line Golf Club tie and a pack of playing cards.
regards,
Ben Masey

Did anyone out there, get an invite to QUAGLINO'S in London, for those who did Twentyfive years service? Hope I got the spelling correct.

Ben Masey
26th April 2010, 13:59
Did anyone out there, get an invite to QUAGLINO'S in London, for those who did Twentyfive years service? Hope I got the spelling correct.

I had an invitation there,from Lord Inverforths Office,to the Bank Line Golf Club annual dinner.Very nice.
I did not complete the 25 years for the stag club.
regards,
Ben Masey

McMorine
26th April 2010, 15:20
I had an invitation there,from Lord Inverforths Office,to the Bank Line Golf Club annual dinner.Very nice.
I did not complete the 25 years for the stag club.
regards,
Ben Masey

I just wondered what kind of do they had for the Stag Club and what Quaglino's was like as a place, might be someone still living who was there.

Alistair Macnab
26th April 2010, 16:36
I was with Bank Line for 29 years and on reaching the 25-year level, I was sent a personal letter from Lord Inverforth (Roy Weir) along with a gold propelling pencil in recognition of my service. I was also invited to the next Stag Club dinner at Quaglino's but as I was overseas, the opportunity to attend was unavailable. Nevertheless, I hear that the evenings were always a great success with seating arranged by a drawing which meant that your dinner-table neighbours could be anyone, including the boss. There was a bit of jocular formality in that there was a customary "roasting" of new members.
My London-visit timing was always wrong and I never attended a Stag Club dinner during the succeeding four years that I was with the company. I can't really recall if they continued during the downsizing period.
Ben says "perhaps there is someone who's still living who attended a Stag Club dinner at Quaglino's" and I hasten to add that there must be more than a few survivors left in their early 70s. Perhaps as a theme for the next Bank Line Reunion meeting this year, there should be an effort made to attract any Stag Club members? Will Ben mention it to Brian Lucy or shall I?

Andy Lavies
2nd May 2010, 21:09
I have a Wightlinl seafarers tie, a tasteful navy blue with the styalised 'W' flag that is the company's houseflag followed by an embroidered anchor. They were soon withdrawn but I'd 'lost' mine so they didn't get it back.
Andy

alasdair mcglashan
29th December 2011, 23:30
I still have a t shirt I think I got it in the hong kong bar in Penang.

mickrick
30th December 2011, 11:46
I did the maiden voyage on the Pikebank, and was there (but not on the bridge) when we famously ran down a 57ft seiner during sea-trials. The Superintendents (who were on the bridge) ran around briefing everyone, "Remember, it's Ship 907, not Pikebank". Anyway, once we got to PNG, we had commemorative t-shirts made with a fist crushing a fishing-boat like a beer-can. And remember, bad taste is better than no taste at all.

david harrod
3rd January 2012, 07:31
I just got given a tiny china egg cup with the Bank Line badge on it; it was given to a friend of mine may years ago by Capt AE Newton...I do not recall ever seeing these on the ships I sailed on; I suspect it came from the white ships...any clues anyone?

david harrod
3rd January 2012, 08:31
I did the maiden voyage on the Pikebank, and was there (but not on the bridge) when we famously ran down a 57ft seiner during sea-trials. The Superintendents (who were on the bridge) ran around briefing everyone, "Remember, it's Ship 907, not Pikebank". Anyway, once we got to PNG, we had commemorative t-shirts made with a fist crushing a fishing-boat like a beer-can. And remember, bad taste is better than no taste at all.

Just like SP lager! I was also there on the maiden voyage ( I was mater and stood by the building) and trials (also not on the bridge at the time...) as I recall it it was a moot point who hit who...I don't remember the t shirt,; perhaps i need to eat more fish...

bones140
5th February 2014, 14:36
I still have my "Do it World Wide T Shirt" Not in bad nick either. Intend getting a couple of copies made before it eventually disintegrates.

Hello Tad. I would like to put my name down for a Bank Line T Shirt if you manage to get some copies made. I'm sure there would be a ready market on here and the Bank Line Nostalgia website. The size may be a problem though! I'm no longer the 11 stone I weighed when I started as a cadet! There are some very smart gentlemen modeling them here: http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/guides/Bank_Line_-_Part_9

Biggles Wader
5th February 2014, 14:59
I think I still have the T shirt.Probably shrunk a bit and rather motheaten.Ill have a look.

banklinephil
18th April 2014, 12:03
I had one of the T shirts from PNG - if it fitted me now I would be shocked given I only weighed 10st 7lb back in 1978.

I sailed with Ian Blenkinsop on the Teviotbank when he joined her in Suez as 3rd mate - I was first trip cadet.

IBlenkinsopp
23rd April 2014, 13:22
I had one of the T shirts from PNG - if it fitted me now I would be shocked given I only weighed 10st 7lb back in 1978.

I sailed with Ian Blenkinsop on the Teviotbank when he joined her in Suez as 3rd mate - I was first trip cadet.

Hi Phil,
Not me I'm afraid, I was on the Clover in 1978 with Captain Taylor & Collinson until they sacked me!
I.E.B.

Biggles Wader
23rd April 2014, 20:27
I had one of the T shirts from PNG - if it fitted me now I would be shocked given I only weighed 10st 7lb back in 1978.

I sailed with Ian Blenkinsop on the Teviotbank when he joined her in Suez as 3rd mate - I was first trip cadet.

Found my old T shirt.It has shrunk a bit over the years.(Thumb)
Now to dig out the cap badge and Bank Line tie.At least that should still fit.