Texaco Maracaibo

Tmac1720
20th October 2005, 18:58
Doing some research to answer a fellow members question I chanced across a reference on the US Coast Guard web site to the Texaco Maracaibo being involved in some sort of accident in 1965 but does not provide any details. Is there any chance any of you lads, and lasses of course, would have some details on this? I'm almost sure the oracle, Rudd would have a photograph of her.
Texaco Maracaibo Built H&W Belfast yard number 1656 Launched 6th August 1964 delivered 14th January 1965 51774 tons for Texaco (Panama) Inc.

ruud
20th October 2005, 19:42
Ahoy,

Sorry can't help you out this time, I do have a lot of Texaco tankers, but not this one, didn't she sunk?
Seems on Riversea-Tugtalk there is a photo of her.

Tmac1720
20th October 2005, 20:41
Ahoy Ruud,
I can't believe I've managed to stump you on a photograph. Regarding her fate that is the problem I simply don't know. It would appear that she was involved in some kind of disaster in 1965 which is when she entered service but I simply can't locate any details of the incident. She appears to have simply disappeared after this as no record of her or a name change can be found. Texaco simply refuse to answer any questions on her, it's all very strange, even stranger the H&W archives don't have a photograph either.
Thanks for trying to find one anyway. (Thumb) P.S. Apologies for mis-spelling your name earlier.

Gulpers
21st October 2005, 09:43
Oul hand,

How intriguing! I have dug about since reading your original post and, like you, have turned up absolutely nothing! I vividly remember her name but, for the life of me, I can not remember her fate. I have one or two more avenues to explore, but that may take a day or two. Hmmm! (?HUH)

Tmac1720
21st October 2005, 14:11
Gulpers,

Yeah it's all very strange, she appears to have simply vanished off the radar. I drew a blank from the US Coast Guard except for a vague reference to a disaster in 1965, also drew a blank from the Texaco/Chevron web site where she had no listing at all among the list of tankers. Hopefully you will have better luck than me with your research. I know a few lads at LLoyds Register so I've run my query past them even if she was ABS registered they might have some knowledge of her fate. To think this all started with a simple question about a funnel. (Read)

Gulpers
21st October 2005, 14:44
Oul hand,

You are following almost exactly the same route as me. This has become a challenge ..... there must be some info out there!

p.s. She did have a funnel! (Applause)

ruud
21st October 2005, 14:48
Ahoy,

Nevermind the miss-spelling, I knew it was mentioned for me, that's enough.
If you "Google" on the name Texaco Maracaibo, than appears a ship in Images, and furnished by Riversea[postcards], maybe you should ask there.

http://riversea.tugtalk.co.uk/

U.S. Coastguard only describes her only in their list of disaster and shipwrecks;and they seems to have a photo.

Name: TEXACO MARACAIBO

Year of Disaster: 1965

Place of Disaster:

Vessel/s Involved: supertanker

Photo: yes

Official Records: no

News Articles: no

Topic:

More Info:

Gulpers
21st October 2005, 14:53
Ruud,

Yeah, got the picture. Spooky though, I made the same search yesterday with negative results ........ the plot thickens! (?HUH)

Tmac1720
21st October 2005, 16:02
Gulpers, Ruud,

Spooky indeed I had the same result yesterday. The US Coast Guard will not grant access to their photograph and I'm still awaiting their response as to why not. Like Alice in wonderland it just gets curiousier and curiousier.
Yes she had a funnel, big smokey thing at the back (*)) Just what are we digging into here? (EEK)

Dave Edge
22nd October 2005, 00:11
Whatever befell the "Texaco Maracaibo" she obviously survived it as she was still listed in the 1970's. A Texaco tanker with a name from the same geographical area which sank and of which Ruud may be thinking was the "Texaco Caribbean".

Gulpers
22nd October 2005, 00:23
David,

Strange! I have looked at the same USCG information which Ruud quotes. Something happened to the Maracaibo in 1965 and, whether she survived or not, there was certainly an incident at that time which is difficult to trace.

Tmac1720
22nd October 2005, 17:23
This is getting like the X Files. Still awaiting a response from the USCG re details of the incident and access to the photograph. (EEK)

John Cassels
23rd October 2005, 10:26
Trying to dredge back in my memory.
Was this not the incident where - while outward bound from the lake fully laden - she
ran up on some obstruction or shoaled ground. The case was notable for the fact
that pilotage authority blamed the lake authority and vice versa, each saying the
other should have been aware of the danger.
I seem to think it was something along these lines.

Gulpers
23rd October 2005, 10:59
John,

That does sound familiar.

Just checked Lloyd's. No casualty history there.
Additional detail to Oul hand's original posting:-

TEXACO MARACAIBO

Flag: Panama
DWT: 100320
C/S: HPDR
Broken Up: 26/12/78 Tung Ho Steel Enterprise Corp., Kaohsiung

the yard
27th October 2005, 00:03
Hi All

I've just uploaded an image of the Texaco Maracaibo.

Patalavaca
3rd December 2005, 15:32
I am not very good at this & struggling to pick up the threads !!!

I didn't know that you were all discussing the "maracaibo"- I thought that all the info was just available on the photo page . Doh!

I have also gone down the USCG road and e-mailed them for info but have only just found that it has been done by you guys.

John Cassels version of events rings a bell for me , but can't confirm anything yet. Making other enquiries too and will post results if succesful !

Regards,
Threadless!

Piero43
3rd December 2005, 18:54
Wasn't the "Texaco Maracaibo" the tanker who ran aground off the coasts of Alaska with an huge oil pollution, causing the first enviromental disaster of this kind?
Piero

Gulpers
3rd December 2005, 19:00
Wasn't the "Texaco Maracaibo" the tanker who ran aground off the coasts of Alaska with an huge oil pollution, causing the first enviromental disaster of this kind?
Piero
No, sorry Piero. That was EXXON VALDEZ. She ran aground on Bligh Reef, Prince William Sound, Alaska. 24 March 1989. (Thumb)

Piero43
4th December 2005, 15:23
Yes Gulpers, you are right. I remembered Exxon Valdez, but in my memory Texaco Maracaibo arises something of similar, although indefinite.
I just sent a query to LR, hoping in some kind of answer.
P.

Gulpers
5th December 2005, 00:05
Piero,

I hope you are correct - lets see what Lloyds come up with then. I still think John Cassels is closest to the mark though! (Thumb)

Patalavaca
6th December 2005, 12:10
Morning All,
the United States Coast Guard have replied to me today & a very nice letter received too! However it offers no further information about the " incident" that we are all trying to track down.
They have sent me a single photocopy of the " ' Maracaibo". It is a view taken from aft, looking for'ard and the ship seems to be under way on a normal voyage and is rather ordinary!
I will copy it and post it...it is not very clear .

The USCG Historian who wrote the letter says " this is all we have on Texaco Maracaibo", i.e. just one photo.
Will we ever get to the bottom of this ???


Regards,
Patalavaca

Gulpers
6th December 2005, 13:36
Good try Patalavaca. My money is still on JC's version! (Thumb)

John Cassels
6th December 2005, 14:45
Guys, this is driving me nuts.
Even tried archives of the New york times which go back to 1851. Plenty
references to Texaco Maracaibo but only re the sailing list,nothing about
a grounding.

Anyone remember Richard Cahill's two books - Collisions and their causes and
Groundings and their causes from about 20 years ago. Methinks I read about
the accident there.

JC

paul0510
6th December 2005, 15:13
..anybody decent in Spanish to search archives in Venezuela?!!
The channel into Maracaibo is renowned for its groundings even in recent years, so I guess JC's notion is fairly spot-on. (The bridge itself got hammered in '64 by a passing tanker, parts of it collapsing, but that was before the TM was launched!)

japottinger
6th December 2005, 17:32
Believe it or not I have a photo of the said tanker I took on the Clyde in the sixties(?). will post when next scanning.
Jim

Tmac1720
6th December 2005, 20:36
This just gets more mysterious. The USCG sent me a brief report stating she had been involved in an "incident" but would or could not provide any details. Strange they admit to an "incident" but then don't provide any details, what could they possibly gain by being so coy? Why mention it at all and then clam up, surely better to say nothing than arouse our curiosity all the more, sure has me foxed. The truth is out there but where are Mulder and Scully when you need them?

John Rogers
6th December 2005, 21:16
Maybe they didn't say anything because the incident is still pending in court awaiting a decision on who was at fault. Just a thought.
John

Patalavaca
7th December 2005, 01:05
I am in the process of copying the photocopy receievd from USCG. It is an awful copy but I will post it nonetheless, for curiosity's sake.

Paul, I am fair- to- middling in Spanish so will try to take a look through any Venezuelan archives.BUT if anybody finds anything in Spanish on her then please bring it to my attention!

Regards,

Patalavaca

John Cassels
7th December 2005, 14:46
Think the reason there is so little info on the vessel and the incident is (if my memory
is still correct) that there was no spill , no tanks were ruptured , there was no
environmental problems.
As I said in #13 , the main interest generated at the time was the manner in which
the incident occured and not the aftermath of grounding. In fact I'm not sure that
she really grounded , think she just made bottom contact due to silting /lack of
dredging , something along these lines. Pilots /port authorities blamed each other and
thats what made the news at the time.

jc

Gulpers
7th December 2005, 14:53
Think the reason there is so little info on the vessel and the incident is (if my memory
is still correct) that there was no spill , no tanks were ruptured , there was no
environmental problems.
As I said in #13 , the main interest generated at the time was the manner in which
the incident occured and not the aftermath of grounding. In fact I'm not sure that
she really grounded , think she just made bottom contact due to silting /lack of
dredging , something along these lines. Pilots /port authorities blamed each other and
thats what made the news at the time.

jc
JC,

I think you could be correct there, although, I had a notion that she got stuck on the putty for a tide or two!
Let's hope you are correct or we will all be losing sleep over Texaco Maracaibo! (Thumb)

Piero43
8th December 2005, 13:20
I just received by LR this answer to my query:

"Dear Mr De Marzo,
Thank you for your email of 4th December which has been passed to me.
Our records do not show the 1965 built tanker being wrecked in 1965, however if you want further details of the ship and her final fate, our research fee is £125.00. If you want me to proceed with the research, just let me know so I can send you our credit card form to fill in and sign.
Further details re a casualty involving her may be available from www.informa.com as they records all types of casualties whereas we only show total losses.
Regards,
Anne Cowne
Information Officer
Corporate Communications"

So two things are certain:
1) the ship survived
2) the curiosity about her final fate is no worth £125...at least for a Genoese! (we are considered the Scots of Italy...)

I tried also the link suggested by LR, but the query gave no results about "Texaco Maracaibo". I sent a request for info by e-mail to informa.com, and I'm waiting for an answer.

All this difficulty in finding info is suspect.
Sure that the "grounding" wasn't an collision with some military subject, maybe a submerged sub o something like that?
P.

Thamesphil
8th December 2005, 14:01
I doubt that you will get anything from Informa (formerly Lloyds of London Press)

If they had recorded a casualty for the vessel, it would be mentioned in their publication 'Maritime Casualties 1963-1996'. It's not in there, so I wouldn't bother.

Phil

John Cassels
3rd August 2006, 09:31
Gentlemen,

Did we ever find out what the story behind her grounding was ??.

JC

ruud
3rd August 2006, 09:57
Ahoy John,

Nope.....Questions to the Coast-Guard,etcetera were not answered or not known, still hoping that someone will come up.

gdynia
3rd August 2006, 10:36
John
I found the following on a Coastguard website

Name: TEXACO MARACAIBO

Year of Disaster: 1965

Place of Disaster:

Vessel/s Involved: supertanker

Photo: yes

Official Records: no

News Articles: no

Topic:

More Info:

It seems the oil companies can keep these events out of the press.

Gulpers
3rd August 2006, 15:57
Gentlemen,

Did we ever find out what the story behind her grounding was ??.

JC
John,

I've merged the two Texaco Maracaibo threads for the sake of continuity.

Rgds, (Thumb)

vampteq
3rd August 2006, 16:06
I am in the process of copying the photocopy receievd from USCG. It is an awful copy but I will post it nonetheless, for curiosity's sake.
Do you still have a copy of it? I'd be quite interested to have a look, if that's at all possible.

Many Thanks,

Samuel

danube4
3rd August 2006, 18:53
Hi all, Just read that Texaco Maracaibo was involved with "MV Grandcamp" liberty ship.And "MV Highflyer" c-2 cargo vessel. 1965. I think it was a collision.
Barney.

Gulpers
4th August 2006, 14:06
Hi all, Just read that Texaco Maracaibo was involved with "MV Grandcamp" liberty ship.And "MV Highflyer" c-2 cargo vessel. 1965. I think it was a collision.
Barney.
Barney,
Well done, where did you find this information?
Does your source give a location and did Texaco Maracaibo ground as a result of the incident? (Thumb)

gdynia
4th August 2006, 15:48
Hi all, Just read that Texaco Maracaibo was involved with "MV Grandcamp" liberty ship.And "MV Highflyer" c-2 cargo vessel. 1965. I think it was a collision.
Barney.

Barney the Incident you are speaking about resulted in 1947 heres a paragraph from a webpage. Its way before the Maracibo

Hugh Stephens tells how, on April 16th, 1947, two Liberty ships docked at Texas City on the Houston ship channel -- the Grandcamp and the High Flyer. Both were loading cargoes of that same fertilizer. The Grandcamp held 2300 tons -- the High Flyer, 1000 tons. The rest of High Flyer's cargo was sulfur.

At 8:00 that morning, a small fire broke out in one of the Grandcamp's holds. The ship master tried to suffocate the fire by closing the hatches. He didn't want to use water for fear he'd damage his cargo. At 8:30, the hatches blew and, observers said, a beautiful orange smoke began pouring out. Finally firemen began hosing down the hold. But, by now, the water just vaporized.

Heres another webpage about the Grandcamp

http://www.local1259iaff.org/disaster.html

Gulpers
4th August 2006, 17:43
Ok! Thanks Neville.
So, we are still none the wiser regarding Texaco Maracaibo's incident. (?HUH)

danube4
4th August 2006, 18:21
Hi Gulpers and Gdynia . I'm sorry I was missled, I thought I was on to something, but i read it wrong. Check this, you will see why.
www.answers.com/tanker+ship+texaco+maracaibo?gwp=12&method=2

I was also missled by this:
www.answers.com/ship+mv+grandcamp+accident+ussikyla+finland?gwp=12&method=2

Gdynia, thanks for the web page. What a terrible disaster, its hard to imagine something like that could take so many lives, and do so much damage.
All the best. Barney.

Gulpers
4th August 2006, 18:31
Barney,

Thanks for trying. Shame, I thought you were on to something there!
Got to agree, the url's you posted are a bit misleading.
Oh well, keep looking. (Applause)

gdynia
4th August 2006, 20:37
Gents
For some unknown reason all articles on this vessel seem to be blocked

vampteq
5th August 2006, 03:28
*all* articles?

John Cassels
5th August 2006, 09:42
This sure remains a mystery. Wish I could remember where I read the article
but of course it's a long time ago.

In the 60's , Texaco were heavily involved in drilling,testing in the lake and were
getting a lot of hassle from environmental groups , so could well be that the
incident is "forgotten" for political reasons. It happened and can still remember
reading about the reasons . Pilots had also been trained by Tecaco in the states.

JC

John Cassels
5th August 2006, 09:44
Sorry , should have been;
"trained by Texaco in the states".

JC

gdynia
5th August 2006, 10:29
*all* articles?
Take the time to do an internet search for the vessel and see how many hits you get. Ive access to the most upto date shipping computers and cannot get a lead.

gdynia
5th August 2006, 10:40
Found another Texaco Vessel involved in a collision but still not our mystery vessel

The first accident occurred on 11th January 1971 when the Cypriot registered vessel PARACAS, 10,000 tonnes, collided with the Panamanian registered tanker TEXACO CARRIBEAN, 14,000 tonnes.

The TEXACO CARRIBEAN exploded and broke in two, with the loss of eight lives. The after section remained afloat for some time before sinking, while the bow section was submerged just below the surface. The PARACAS was badly damaged and towed to Hamburg for repairs. The following day the German registered vessel BRANDENBURG, 3,000 tonnes, struck a section of the TEXACO CARRIBEAN and within two miles capsized and sank with the loss of 21 crew members.

Tmac1720
5th August 2006, 13:34
I've also run into a brick wall trying to find out what happened. I've used just about every source I had during my time in H&W but zilch. As Neville said just a wall of silence. It's all very strange..........something happened that's for sure.........but WHAT??? and why such secrecy.? (?HUH) (Whaaa)

vampteq
5th August 2006, 18:40
anyone ever thought of *asking* Texaco what happened? And if they deny knowledge, there are other ways of finding out..

Gulpers
5th August 2006, 18:56
vampteq,
Good idea! Give it a shot and let us know how you get on. (Applause)

gdynia
5th August 2006, 19:23
anyone ever thought of *asking* Texaco what happened? And if they deny knowledge, there are other ways of finding out..

Unfortunately Texaco do not exist any longer as a Shipping company. They merged several years ago with Chevron and became known as Chevron Texaco. Last year when I was working in Chevrons main office in Huston, Texas it was decided that the Texaco part of the name will no longer appear.As with the name the records were moved and the webpages ceased to be produced. The only time you will see the old logo Chevron Texaco will be on the Stationary as they reckon on it taking another 3 years to be used all up and completely out of service. The old shipping records dissapeared in 2 weeks

flyer682
8th August 2006, 11:19
anyone ever thought of *asking* Texaco what happened? And if they deny knowledge, there are other ways of finding out..
In view of the many avenues which seem to have been explored, I'm somewhat intrigued by your comment: "there are other ways of finding out".
Would you care to enlighten us to what they are, or perhaps once you've found them, you could share them with us??

Gulpers
11th August 2006, 04:59
Folks,

Texaco Maracaibo experienced six reportable incidents before her eventual disposal in 1978. Sadly information is sketchy. There was indeed a reportable incident in June 1965 but, whatever it was, it was classed as not serious!

June 1965
Hull/Machinery damage
Not serious
On voyage
At sea
No assistance
Continued on voyage

June 1966
Hull/Machinery damage
Not serious
On voyage
At sea – Western Mediterranean
Diverted from voyage

September 1966
Hull/Machinery damage
Not serious
On voyage
At sea
Assistance given
Continued on voyage

January 1970
Hull/Machinery damage
Not serious
On voyage
At sea
No assistance
Continued on voyage

April 1973
Hull/Machinery damage
Serious
On voyage
At sea – US Eastern Seaboard
Assistance given
Towed

August 1973
Hull/Machinery damage
Not serious
On voyage Brunsbuttel to Piraeus
At sea – English Channel
Diverted from voyage

December 1978
Broken Up: Tung Ho Steel Enterprise Corp., Kaohsiung

thunderd
11th August 2006, 05:07
Ray, that last one on December 1978 sure was a serious one!!!!

Gulpers
11th August 2006, 05:15
Derek,
By that time, it was probably a 'kindness' to put her down! :@

John Cassels
11th August 2006, 09:59
Gentlemen;

As I mentioned in post #23 , I may have read it in one of Richard Cahill's excellent
books "Groundings and their causes".
Anyone have (or can get hold of ) a copy ?.

I remember at the time , the book - together with the sister volume "Collisions and
their causes " made facinating reading.

Also remember that whwre I read the article , their was also a reproduction of the
chart showing what happened.

JC

Split
11th August 2006, 11:22
Texaco Overseas Tankships (TOT) have a link for their British Flag personel and ships at

http://www.tota.co.uk/index.php?page=1

I mention this because of the interest in the "Maracaibo". There is a charge of ten quid to become a member, though, (which may diminish the interest a bit!) and that MAY get you to talk with someone who MAY know more of the story, nothing guaranteed, though. I mention this because of the 10 quid! This was a Panam flag ship and is not on their list but all their British flag ships, both Caltex and Texaco, are listed (free) with photos and details, if anyone is interested.
Split

Split
11th August 2006, 11:41
Anyone visiting the ships section of TOT will be interested in the Texaco Great Britain-. I'm glad I didn't sail in her, my days were with Caltex. We had more fun up and down the Australian coast in the T-2's, while the prestige of sailing 200,000 tonners seems to be mingled with fond memories of bits falling off. No thanks.

The pity of the Great Britain, though, is that she was built on the Tyne by Swan Hunter. Not a good example of British shipbuilding, I'm afraid.

Split

len mazza
9th April 2011, 08:52
I can clearly being shown a news photo by the Chief Stwd.on a Shell H Class of a something Maricabo hitting the bridge to the entrance to the lake,that would have been about '64/'65.

Len Mazza R621945

Malky Glaister
9th April 2011, 11:06
Gentlemen, the following may be of interest.

Google GENERAL RAFEEL URDANETA BRIDGE

The bridge over the lake mouth.

Scroll to HISTORY and click on ship collision.
the page USS NARRAGUAGAS appears.

Scroll to post war decommissioning and ESSO MARACAIBO is mentioned as hitting bridge in 64 0r 65 etc.

Hope this helps

best regards Malky

Wribbenhall
9th April 2011, 17:32
Gentlemen, the following may be of interest.

Google GENERAL RAFEEL URDANETA BRIDGE

The bridge over the lake mouth.

Scroll to HISTORY and click on ship collision.
the page USS NARRAGUAGAS appears.

Scroll to post war decommissioning and ESSO MARACAIBO is mentioned as hitting bridge in 64 0r 65 etc.

Hope this helps

best regards Malky



I googled that,and I see that the poster of the WIKIPEDIA article,as sometimes happens,is wrongly informed.

The article refers to the ex-gasoline tanker m.t.USS NARRAGUAGAS
of 1,453 dwt.as hitting the bridge. She was enamed ESSO MARACAIBO on being decommissioned and sold in 1947,but had been sold and renamed twice )(in 1956 and 1961 as YURTIA and SARITA)long before the accident in 64.
She is not the one that hit the bridge then.



No it wasthe s.t.ESSO MARACAIBO (Venezuelan Flag) which hit the Bridge and was a much bigger tanker( 35,601 dwt.) built in 1959.

After the accident in 64 she was rebuilt and jumboised to 40,925 dwt.
She was renamed LAGOVEN MARACAIBO in 76 and broken up in Kaohsiung 20.6.85

There is a picture of the accident and details on the excellent Auke Visser site.
http://www.aukevisser.nl/others/id384.htm

Burntisland Ship Yard
9th April 2011, 21:21
Found a couple of pics, one of the "Texaco Version
http://www.photoship.co.uk/JAlbum%20Ships/Old%20Ships%20T/slides/Texaco%20Maracaibo-02.html
The other of the "Esso" Version
http://www.aukevisser.nl/others/id384.htm

Using a Scottish expression "a wee bit different"

Malky Glaister
9th April 2011, 23:23
Nice one Wribbenhall, I had recalled something about the bridge and the ***** Maracaibo and Googled it but obviously not as significant as I thought. So we are still none the wiser about the Texaco version for which Burntisland produced a nice picture ( Butterworth bleeder overside).

Regards Malky

Sarky Cut
17th April 2011, 18:02
Hi I remember a news story about a Texaco Tanker where there was an explosion and the midships was blown clean off allowing the 2nd officer the unique position of being in command as the ship sailed away from him.

Wribbenhall
18th April 2011, 09:19
Hi I remember a news story about a Texaco Tanker where there was an explosion and the midships was blown clean off allowing the 2nd officer the unique position of being in command as the ship sailed away from him.


Well,I don't know about that, but a similar scenario certainly happened to the STANVAC JAPAN in 1958.

The story is on this site(just use Search), but I have condensed the story here from those posts.
On Sunday 19th October 1958 the Stanvac Japan ,in ballast from Bombay to Ras Tanura,suffered a severe explosion whilst 160 miles south-west of Karachi. Seventeen crew died including seven British . The remaining 53 crew were rescued by the Panamanian tanker Patricia on Stanvac charter.
The Japanese tanker Shinyo Maru with doctor aboard went to assist,as did an Indian Navy cruiser with doctors and nurses aboard.
The tanker was reported to be insured for £.1.5 M.
 
There were 17 British Officers and 53 Indian Seamen aboard.

The Master,4 Officers ,2 Apprentices and 10 of the Seamen were killed.

Surviving 2nd Officer( Gordon Allely of Moseley,Birmingham)walked off the bridge ’midship superstructure which had been blown off the hull into the sea) and swam ½ mile back to the disabled ship; he was on watch on the midships bridge at the time. The explosion blew the entire bridge structure overboard and Gordon got to his feet to see the ship sailing on ,belching smoke. Gordon escaped from the bridge by smashing a window with his bare hands ( all the doors were jammed shut) he found another person in the water but could not support that person long enough for rescue .

 
 
Probable cause was two explosions #5 Centre and #8 Stbd tanks during tank cleaning.explosion.The conclusion was the Butterworth tank cleaning process built up static and caused the explosion. The Buttterworth cleaning process was ceased throughout the fleet.
Cause was thought but not proven to be cages holding manganese anodes used at the time falling due to corrosion and anodes striking the deck causing explosions.
The Court of Inquiry held on 12th -15th Oct 1959, was unable to ascertain the probable cause of the explosion owing to the absence of any direct evidence, as all involved on the bridge (except the 2nd Officer)and deck were killed.


W.B.H.

Binnacle
18th April 2011, 10:49
Texaco Maracaibo ID No. 6420252, completed Belfast 14/1/65, broken up Kaohsung 6/12/78. A number of images on Google.