Admiralty Pilot Books

sidsal
11th February 2010, 15:00
Most ships I sailed on years ago had a set of Admiralty Pilot Books covering most of the world. They conatined a lot of very interesting historical detail about the area covered. For instance when we went from Panama to Tahiti under sail we consulted these books to find suitable attols and isalnds to call at and found there was the history of their discovery etc.
I thought that as so many ships are scrapped each year that there would be a glut of these books on the market but despite advertising in the nautical press I only managed to get three or four.
Where did they all go to ?

Lancastrian
11th February 2010, 15:44
Quite a few here - http://www.vo2ov.com/Admiralty-Pilot-Books-Sailing-_309918.html

kevhogg
11th February 2010, 16:10
most of these books are now on cd/rom.I know they are on our ship.

K urgess
11th February 2010, 18:48
Not the same as having the book in front of you.
Especially the older ones that smell of the sea and Stockholm tar. (Thumb)

sidsal
11th February 2010, 20:27
Thanks for the info you chaps. I have a feeling that the newer pilot books do not contain as much historical info as the older ones. The newer books were larger ( in surface dimension) whilst the old ones were of a normal book size.
Don't know the technical terms for book sizes.The CD Roms are I suppose a logical step forward though as you say - not the same as a book in frnt of you !#
Cheers

vasco
13th February 2010, 00:41
most of these books are now on cd/rom.I know they are on our ship.

The latest editions I've been getting have no cd, nor the envelope for them stuck on the cover.

Just as well really as the cds were nicked in any case. The information is still all there though.

markcarballo990
12th September 2012, 15:04
Not the same as having the book in front of you.
Especially the older ones that smell of the sea and Stockholm tar. (Thumb)

Absolutely! New books, even online readings are good. But, those things are gem for some people like us. :)

borderreiver
12th September 2012, 15:17
Good reading on long anchor watches.
Always made the point on each voyage the book/s for that voyage were on the chart table book case and I had read up for the area we were transiting plus any corrections.

Waighty
12th September 2012, 17:03
As an ex editor of Sailing Directions (Pilot Books) I found them a lot more interesting when working on them as opposed to reading them at sea! That might sound odd but until I started work at UKHO I had no idea how complicated a process it was getting a book ready for publication. There exists a mighty tome on how the books should be written, the font required, how the views (UKHO speak for photos) are to be inserted, how to prove the veracity of received information, etc etc. That said it could be fascinating work particularly when liaising with the chart production folk, the legal folk and any other specialist group involved in maritime information, protocols and legislation. As I recall the CDs were stopped as a money saving measure! Certainly provided me with a nice run-down job before retirement. Only drawback, given the qualifications and experience required, the salary wasn't up to much. A good mix of ex MN and RN seafarers which provided much banter, not to mention lamp swinging tales!

Hugh Ferguson
12th September 2012, 17:50
Not the same as having the book in front of you.
Especially the older ones that smell of the sea and Stockholm tar. (Thumb)

How true, how true! Seeing this post got me rummaging on one of my groaning book-shelves for something similar; "Ocean Passages for the World". It weighs more than 5lbs and the only hand-written inscription is by W.A.J.Welsh, Commander B.I.S.N.C. Calcutta 26th July 1944.
Sub-titles are:- Published by Order of the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty in 1923 18s.6d net. 585 pages of incredible detail to assist in the making of ocean passages under both sail, and steam.

I haven't the foggiest idea of how I acquired it! I'm certain I didn't buy it, or steal it!

borderreiver
12th September 2012, 19:09
How true, how true! Seeing this post got me rummaging on one of my groaning book-shelves for something similar; "Ocean Passages for the World". It weighs more than 5lbs and the only hand-written inscription is by W.A.J.Welsh, Commander B.I.S.N.C. Calcutta 26th July 1944.
Sub-titles are:- Published by Order of the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty in 1923 18s.6d net. 585 pages of incredible detail to assist in the making of ocean passages under both sail, and steam.

I haven't the foggiest idea of how I acquired it! I'm certain I didn't buy it, or steal it!

Does it have a section when going from Ras Hadd in the Monsoon proceed south to 10deg north, This was done by British Queen in year??. I always followed this and i am sure I gained a few miles. One Border boat we lost part of the flying bridge.

Hugh Ferguson
13th September 2012, 14:22
Does it have a section when going from Ras Hadd in the Monsoon proceed south to 10deg north, This was done by British Queen in year??. I always followed this and i am sure I gained a few miles. One Border boat we lost part of the flying bridge.

Might this apply?

It gives for route 184, Aden to Colombo, May to September.
Steer first for a position 13.00N: 55.00E and from thence direct, or a Rhumb line to destination.

or, to Fremantle, route 186: All seasons.
Steer for position 12.25N: 50.30E., and after rounding Ras Asir take the Great Circle track to Fremantle.

(I remember the British Queen, she was a regular to I.o.G.)

It just occurred to me that your query may relate to Canal closure era?!?!

borderreiver
13th September 2012, 15:24
No This was to get out of the monsoon. On voyages to the cape.

Hugh Ferguson
13th September 2012, 21:03
From Persian Gulf to Capetown during the S.W. Monsoon the directions are as follows:-
"Follow the trend of the African coast as far as Mombasa and then as directly as navigation permits, keeping at a distance of about 30 miles from the shore, in the strength of the Agulhas current".

(Was this British Queen the same ship I would have piloted sometime in the 1970's. I well remember that era when anything that could carry oil was brought into service: one tanker I recall was the first ship I had been in where a watch-keeper was female. She was 3rd mate and came from Trieste. The master was Italian and the mate-whom she didn't get to relieve until 08.30-was Spanish. It was a ship with some emotional events taking place and the mate was, very noticeably, a most unhappy chappie.
The captain, however, was a very contented man and gave the impression that life was so good that he wouldn't in the least mind another 40 days at sea on the way back to the Gulf: the reason for his contentment was the 3rd mate!! I wasn't surprised, she was gorgeous, and I enjoyed her company for what was left of the 8 to 12 watch; I remember her telling me that her family did not approve of her going to sea, they would have been even more disapproving had they known what she was getting up to!)