Tall Ship SV Concordia sunk off Brazil, 64 aboard (students/crew) saved

shamrock
21st February 2010, 16:15
More details can be found here...

http://www.vancouversun.com/news/Canadian+ship+sinks+Brazil+aboard+rescued/2593600/story.html

Sister Eleff
21st February 2010, 21:55
I do hope they can salvage their program and that it doesn't go the same way as the Irish Coiste an Asgard, when the lost their sweet little ship Asgard II in September 2008. Well done to the Master of Concordia and crews of other vessels for the rescue of all souls.

charles henry
22nd February 2010, 15:10
I do hope they can salvage their program and that it doesn't go the same way as the Irish Coiste an Asgard, when the lost their sweet little ship Asgard II in September 2008. Well done to the Master of Concordia and crews of other vessels for the rescue of all souls.F

It was about 180 feet long and a truly beautifull vessel. From local paper coverage it appears she took a broadside wave that put her over sufficienty to be swamped. The crew and students were obviously well trained and all got off safely.

I am certain the vessel and the program will be replaced but will no doubt take some time. Personally I have always felt there is no greater thrill or sense of accomplishment that handling a sailing ship.

regards Charles

Sister Eleff
22nd February 2010, 22:21
I couldn't agree with you more on that one Charles. The other great thrill and sense of accomplishment; is seeing perhaps a weedy, insecure young person come aboard for a trip and when they leave, they have grown so much in a short time into a self assured and capable person. This is why these programs are so beneficial.

charles henry
23rd February 2010, 15:49
I couldn't agree with you more on that one Charles. The other great thrill and sense of accomplishment; is seeing perhaps a weedy, insecure young person come aboard for a trip and when they leave, they have grown so much in a short time into a self assured and capable person. This is why these programs are so beneficial.

When I retired we lived on South Bay in Prince Edward County. Each year during the "cruise of the tall ships" anywhere from five to ten of them would come into our bay and anchor for the night opposite our property. We would visit in the dingy and sometimes would have a grand party on our shore.

There was always a good smattering of youngsters in the crews who always
appeared very "self sufficient".
de chas

John Sansom
24th February 2010, 16:53
There have been some truly remarkable posts on this sad event, most notably on the CBC News Digest site. The whole thing seems to have declined into rancorous exchanges about sailing and weather terminology. I should also add that expressions of relief and thanks that all got off safely were/are predominant.

Best account I've heard as of this posting was a 30-second or so clip of the first mate detailing the adandonment process. I missed his name, but he most certainly seemed to be a cool-headed and knowledgeable chap with more than just a touch of salt in his veins.

ssr481
24th February 2010, 17:21
The gentleman who until recently was General Manager of the Montreal Canadiens NHL team, Bob Gainey, lost his daughter a few years ago (December 2006) when she disappeared (swept overboard is the most likely scenario) whilst sailing aboard the barque Picton Castle.

stein
24th February 2010, 19:01
Member Andrew Craig-Bennet posted an interesting link to a good dicussion on the subject in the Gallery section, I am reposting it here: http://www.woodenboat.com/forum/showthread.php?t=110145 There are some knowledgeable fellows participating.

Billieboy
24th February 2010, 20:10
Member Andrew Craig-Bennet posted an interesting link to a good dicussion on the subject in the Gallery section, I am reposting it here: http://www.woodenboat.com/forum/showthread.php?t=110145 There are some knowledgeable fellows participating.

A very interesting forum stein, though I still stick by my rule, that anything less than 35k dwt is too small!