Children's Books

hazel77
24th February 2010, 10:46
Hi Everyone

I need your help! I'm a Phd student working on children's lit from around 1914 - 1945 and part of this work requires me to write about how Britain's maritime past was presented to children through literature. The problem that I'm having is trying to make sure that I read a range of books that is representative of the period.
So . . . if you know of any books that I should definitely be looking at then do, please let me know.

So far, I've covered the obvious ones such as Ransome, Masefield, Sabatini, Taffrail, Bartimeus, Westerman but the trouble is that a lot of the lesser known writers from the inter war years have been a bit neglected and I want to try to bring them into the foreground again.

Any thing at all that you'd like to recommend will be great. I'm a complete novice to the maritime world so all help is gratefully accepted!

Cheers

Hazel

K urgess
24th February 2010, 13:18
Welcome aboard from East Yorkshire, Hazel.
A look at the children's encyclopedias and children's annuals from the inter war years will give you an idea of how the subject was covered. Books such as "Engineering Wonders of the World" contained a good proportion of articles about the maritime world. Novels by such as Percy Westerman were popular as you mentioned. A lot of the older 19th century books such as "Midshipman Easy" were constantly reprinted.
Find your way around and get to know the crew.
Have a good voyage.

R58484956
24th February 2010, 14:58
Greetings Hazel and a warm welcome to SN on your first interesting posting. Bon voyage.

billyboy
24th February 2010, 21:43
Welcome aboard from the Philippines. Enjoy all this great site has to offer

bert thompson
25th February 2010, 10:15
Hazel welcome to this great site. Series of books I enjoyed as a boy was Arthur Mees Childrens Encyclopedia and The book of ten thousand things. So long ago
Best wishes
Bert.

benjidog
25th February 2010, 22:38
Welcome from Lancashire - I hope you will enjoy the site.

One I have that is slightly before your era (1911) you might like to take a look at is called "Every Boy's Book of Railways and Steamships" by Ernest Protheroe F.Z.S. - fully illustrated and published by The Religious Tract Society, London. Check out eBay or Abebooks as copies come on the market from time to time.

spongebob
25th February 2010, 23:13
Welcome to the site Hazel and what a great field of research about the times when books were the main source of learning and enjoyment for children.
During the war years when new children's books were almost unobtainable in NZ I had to make do with my older sister's editions of "What Katie did at School" and "Milly Molly Mandy" etc until my father obtained a set of Arthur Mee's "Children's Encyclopedia", then the font of most knowledge for kids.
My first real adventures from reading came from R,M, Ballantine's novels "Martin Rattler" and "Coral Island" real sea going and wilderness adventure for approx. 8 to 14 year olds and stories that fed the imagination.

Bob

John Dryden
25th February 2010, 23:16
I can,t help you but I must say you have got one of the worst periods for childrens books,two world wars with a bit in between to go at isn,t easy.I read the kind of books already hinted at,the large pictorial sort of books full of exciting articles and photos that stirred the imagination.Good luck with your SN search.

Prudence
7th March 2010, 03:22
There was a series of books in Australia in the "Digit Dick" series. He was a tiny being about as big as your thumb. One I remember was "Digit Dick and the Great Barrier Reef". These books were illustrated and in colour and featured different parts of Australia as backgrounds to his amazing adventures.
The other poetry I remember was that of John Masefield and some of Charles Chesterton. The "Rhyme of the Ancient Mariner" was drummed into us as was
"The White Ship", "Sir Percy Spens", and the achievements of Sir Richard Grenville and Sir Walter Raleigh. There is a wonderful picture somewhere in Arthur Mees Encyclopedia, from memory, of Sir Walter Raleigh having a bucket of water chucked over him as he smoked his pipe.
There were political lampoons that became childrens songs, and still are, such as "Bobby Shafto's Gone to Sea" and these you will find in the Oxford Encyclopedia of Childrens Nursery Rhymes by the Opies. As an Australia I would look at the stories of Mary Grant Bruce who wrote of the inland but England was then always held as "home"...There are of course the hymnals of various denominations which have hymns about the sea and the curious line in the evening service " From the fury of the Northmen, Good Lord deliver us". I can research my library if you have specific request but at the moment this is from memory.

dom
7th March 2010, 05:59
some poems from Cicely Fox Smith might help

benjidog
7th March 2010, 14:39
There was a series of books in Australia in the "Digit Dick" series. He was a tiny being about as big as your thumb. One I remember was "Digit Dick and the Great Barrier Reef". These books were illustrated and in colour and featured different parts of Australia as backgrounds to his amazing adventures.
The other poetry I remember was that of John Masefield and some of Charles Chesterton. The "Rhyme of the Ancient Mariner" was drummed into us as was
"The White Ship", "Sir Percy Spens", and the achievements of Sir Richard Grenville and Sir Walter Raleigh. There is a wonderful picture somewhere in Arthur Mees Encyclopedia, from memory, of Sir Walter Raleigh having a bucket of water chucked over him as he smoked his pipe.
There were political lampoons that became childrens songs, and still are, such as "Bobby Shafto's Gone to Sea" and these you will find in the Oxford Encyclopedia of Childrens Nursery Rhymes by the Opies. As an Australia I would look at the stories of Mary Grant Bruce who wrote of the inland but England was then always held as "home"...There are of course the hymnals of various denominations which have hymns about the sea and the curious line in the evening service " From the fury of the Northmen, Good Lord deliver us". I can research my library if you have specific request but at the moment this is from memory.

I think that line about the Northmen was about SN members Stein and Marconi Sahib. :)

Prudence
9th March 2010, 09:10
If and when we are introduced I'll remember to duck.

K urgess
9th March 2010, 10:41
I think that line about the Northmen was about SN members Stein and Marconi Sahib. :)

Still smarting over Stamford Bridge, Brian.

A book that might help is "Collecting Children's Books" compiled by book & Magazine Collector (ISBN 0-9532601-2-7). Unfortunately it's in alphabetical order of authors but the publication date is included so skimming for the appropriate era is relatively easy.