Wave Ruler in Falklands Rescue

Lancastrian
17th March 2010, 09:54
The attached photo shows Wave Ruler fuelling an RAF Sea King in a SAR operation to evacuate an injured sailor off a South Korean fish factory ship (SAPPORO) approx 300 miles South East of the Falklands. WVRU was positioned approx 80 miles off the coast to provide HIFR facilities to the Sea King that flew to the ship and winched the casualty prior to returning to Stanley hospital.Conditions were pretty bumpy in a SW 9 and high seas but all went well and he is now in Stanley.
Another role which could be lost by "privatisation"!
Photo by HMS York sent by Shaun Jones who is missing the Gallery.

waldziu
17th March 2010, 10:12
One wonders why the helo did not land on to refuel?

Lancastrian
17th March 2010, 10:18
I'm only guessing but is its possible that in that sea state, the deck was "out of limits", particularly for an RAF pilot who might not be very experienced in landing on ships.

NickNZ
17th March 2010, 11:00
RAF pilots have enough trouble with landing on solid ground, so I've heard. When they heard which ship (& Captain) it was, they probably decided to refuel in flight!

donald h
17th March 2010, 11:01
A beautiful, colourful and wonderful action photo. You can just sense the movement in this shot.
Donald

wigger
17th March 2010, 12:28
Agreed Donald, its an excellent picture.

Noddy-Billing
17th March 2010, 15:01
Well done, the RAF and the RFA.

NoR
17th March 2010, 15:29
Lancastrian
Another role which could be lost by "privatisation"!
Photo by HMS York sent by Shaun Jones who is missing the Gallery.

Why ?

Civilians are not incompetent. Oh I know that RFA personnel are technically civilian but you know what I mean.

Lancastrian
17th March 2010, 15:45
I didnt say they were, but evolutions like this require training by the military and full integration with military command, control and communications. It works, so why try to reinvent the wheel by putting in commercial management, whose only aim is to make a profit from the taxpayer?

captain61
17th March 2010, 21:04
RAF pilots have enough trouble with landing on solid ground, so I've heard. When they heard which ship (& Captain) it was, they probably decided to refuel in flight!

I was in the RAF and you are spot on not very good at landing on the spot(Jester)

Dave Woods
17th March 2010, 21:36
One wonders why the helo did not land on to refuel?

I believe that it is quicker to refuel while hovering as it saves landing, switching off the helicopter engine and then chaining down, not to mention the risk assessments which need to be filled in.

Perhaps someone in the "know" will enlighten us.

Lancastrian
17th March 2010, 22:08
Risk assessments are not required for landing, (or they weren't in my day), you just follow the standard operating procedure. Rotors running refuels can be carried out on deck and you get a better pumping rate, use only nylon strop lashings, so its usually quicker on deck. However each ship type has a set operating envelope for each type of helo which imposes strict limits on relative wind speed and deck movement. (Dont ask me to quote any figures!) The weather is the most likely reason for HIFR in this instance as perhaps Shaun can confirm if he's looking in.

TARBATNESS
17th March 2010, 23:49
Relative wind and ship movement were well out of limits, hence the HIFR. Excellent operation that involved 2 RN/RFA units, RAF C130 and the Sea King.

Andrew Craig-Bennett
18th March 2010, 02:34
Very impressive picture.

NickNZ
18th March 2010, 10:28
Relative wind and ship movement were well out of limits, hence the HIFR. Excellent operation that involved 2 RN/RFA units, RAF C130 and the Sea King.

I don't suppose you have a photo of Wave Ruler refuelling the Herk? That would be impressive!

TARBATNESS
18th March 2010, 12:19
I took a few shots of her doing a low fly by but we were going much too fast for her to land on!

Lancastrian
18th March 2010, 18:03
The official press release. Better late than never!
Seems it was Kiribatian, not Korean.

Coastie
18th March 2010, 20:45
A very nice impressive picture, Shaun.