How to build a Container Ship

samuel j
24th March 2010, 23:31
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=17bK_UflhT4&feature=related

Time lapse video

Peter B
25th March 2010, 01:49
As there are a lot of "confused" comments about this video (to put it mildly), I have added some information (as 'Andante1961').

G0SLP
25th March 2010, 02:42
Well done, Peter. Some of the comments made me cringe; others made me laugh, for sure! Big buggers, aren't they?

Peter B
25th March 2010, 02:59
As it seems YouTube has problems displaying all of my comments, I post them here:

First of all: This video was recorded by the Odense Steel Shipyard Ltd. and handed out to employees for 'private use only', so a bit odd to see it here!
A lot of the comments here are bulls..., so let me clarify:


The vessel is the 'Evelyn Maersk', the second of eight identical vessels being built for Maersk Line. The first of the class was the famous 'Emma Maersk', hence the class is also referred to as the 'Emma Class' or simply the 'E-class'.
The video was recorded in the summer of 2006.
The keel was laid (the first block lifted into the drydock) at noon on May 21. The last lift to the ship (a lashing bridge) took place on August 24 and the keel for the following vessel was laid on August 27, so Evelyn would have been launched on August 24 or possible 25.
This gives you 3 months and 3 days dock-time, which was actually unusally long for this class. There are two reasons for this:
1) The outfitting quay was blocked by the Emma Maersk which was delayed about a month due to a fire in her accomodation block.
2) The three weeks summer holiday fell within this period, significantly slowing down the building process.
The normal for this class was about 45 dock-days.


These vessels are 397,76 m long, beam is 56,4 m, max. draft is 15,5 m, air draft is 76 m. Deadweight tonnage ("payload") is about 156.000 metric tons. Max. service speed is officially 25,5 knots - in reality probably a bit more.


The drydock is 415 x 90 x 11 m.


The tower cranes operating along the side of the dock are mostly 100 tonnes swl, though one is 75 and one is 40 tonnes swl.


The gantry crane assembling the ship from prefabricated blocks operates on 10 kV high-tension electricity and weighs 5200 metric tonnes. It's total height is 114 m.
The total lifting capacity is 1000 metric tonnes.
There are six main hoists with 300 t capacity each, plus one 15 t auxiliary hoist and a 16 t service crane on top.
Track gauge (span) is 148,5 m. The track is 880 m long.
Lifting height over ground / drydock bottom is 77,5 / 88,5 m.
The crane is able to turn over (flip upside down) blocks of up till 600 tons. In many cases, two blocks (port / starboard side blocks of the same type) can be handled simultaneously.

samuel j
25th March 2010, 04:25
You get alot of cringing comments on youtube....guess one gets viewers from a wide selection of the public...(Ouch)

polsteam
6th April 2010, 14:02
As it seems YouTube has problems displaying all of my comments, I post them here:

First of all: This video was recorded by the Odense Steel Shipyard Ltd. and handed out to employees for 'private use only', so a bit odd to see it here!



here we come to issue of "confidentiality"...

I have got some shipbuilding related background and knowledge and I have an impression that companies (owners, shipyards) are over-sensitive (often to the extend that makes one laughing) and they exaggerate in keeping things secret...

when someone is really, I mean really determined to steal some production technology or design secrets he will manage it anyway (using some extra effort or money for surveilance or intelligence equipment or other means), on the other hand - many things kept secret are ordinary "every day" business exactly the same as in dozens of other shipyards, so what the point in keeping them secret ?...

JoK
6th April 2010, 14:52
Really neat video.

Peter B
8th April 2010, 12:10
(*))here we come to issue of "confidentiality"...
(.....)
when someone is really, I mean really determined to steal some production technology or design secrets he will manage it anyway (using some extra effort or money for surveilance or intelligence equipment or other means), on the other hand - many things kept secret are ordinary "every day" business exactly the same as in dozens of other shipyards, so what the point in keeping them secret ?...

I absolutely agree with you, the company policies often seem ridiculous. That, however, does not put the individual employee at liberty to do as he pleases! Having said that, I myself exercise a certain amount of 'common sense' in dealing with information and photos from employers - past or present. (Gleam)

Peter B
9th April 2010, 04:00
Today I came across a CD with the original version of this video.
Now as the cat is already out of the bag on YouTube I figured I would give you folks the opportunity to see it in a much better quality.

Therefore, I have put it up for download on my webserver:
www.blazejewicz.dk/download/Building.zip (http://www.blazejewicz.dk/download/Building.zip)

The file is 286 MB. Unzip and open with Windows Media Player.

A few things to look for when watching:

Notice how most blocks are turned over in the 'gravel pit' approx. in the middle of the picture before being lifted to the drydock (or elsewhere for further preparation).
Also, notice how many blocks are erected in pairs; PS / SB.

The vessel afloat behind L204 is L203, later to be world famous as Emma Mærsk. As some will remember, she suffered a severe fire shortly before she was due for delivery. In the video you can actually see the smoke from the fire at some point. Later you can see her being towed a bit astern to make room for the floating crane used to replace the accomodation block, and you see her resume position with the new block fitted. Towards the end you see her depart for her sea trials.

Enjoy
Peter

John Dryden
9th April 2010, 04:24
It is an amazing video,better than watching flowers grow!Hope you have some new ships on the drawing board.