Radio & Electronic Services

Cunarder
27th October 2005, 17:18
A classic - just a pity Arthur Orum isn't in shot to complete the picture

Alan Marsden

John Leary
27th October 2005, 20:03
Alan

From memory can you remember the names? I last saw Arthur Orum in June 1965 when he oversaw the refit of part of Magdapur's radio room when she was dry-docked at Smith's in North Shields. From memory he died either late 65 or early 66. A great bloke to work with.

Regards
John

Cunarder
27th October 2005, 23:05
At the back, Bill Curry, Ken Fawcett, Angus MacDonald, Mike Norton and Dennis Williamson. Guy at the front, absolutely no idea! but their admin/receptionist - was she Marie or Maria or something?

John Leary
29th October 2005, 15:37
Alan
Any idea when the photograph was take.. The chief radio Super when I was employed by Brocklebanks in 1963 was Ben Lonsdale. The pecking order after him was Arthur Oram and Gordon Caddy. Sadly due to the loss of "Zee little grey cells" I do not recognise the male figure sitting down.

Regards

John

mcook
30th October 2005, 00:15
Every time Ken Fawcett came down to work on or visit a Brock's ship on the UK coast that I was on he would always take me out to dinner and pick up the entire tab. Evidently Cunard passed down an edict that Senior Radio Officers (on passenger ships) were entitled to a chow-down on company expense. I think it was Bill Curry who put the question to Southampton "Does that include the 'Senior' Radio Officers on cargo ships as well?". A Senior RO is a Senior RO whatever the ship is, so Southampton office couldn't back down. Great- I loved it.

Another bit of useless info. was that Gordon Caddy did not like dogs. I did a 6 month spell in Riversdale in '77 taking my City & Guilds Marine Electronics cert. and was on occasion called into the office to have my brain cell picked about some subject or other. I was staying at the MN hotel up the hill from the cathedral (remember the Philharmonic pub with arguably the countries most elaborate gent's toilet?). Anyway, I was in the habit of taking the hotel managers dog for a walk when I got back from college and I continued the habit when summoned down to the office at the Pier Head. Whenever I appeared with the dog (can't remember her name, but she was a black Labrador). Gordon would not only refuse to come out of his office, but actually shut the door! I guess he must have had a bad experience with dogs as a child!

malcolm

Cunarder
30th October 2005, 01:20
John - I can't be any more accurate than, say, mid 70's. I had completely forgotten about dear old Gordon Caddy - wherever he is, I'm sure he'll forgive me....

lonsdale
13th December 2005, 18:24
[QUOTE=John Leary]Alan
Any idea when the photograph was take.. The chief radio Super when I was employed by Brocklebanks in 1963 was Ben Lonsdale. The pecking order after him was Arthur Oram and Gordon Caddy. Sadly due to the loss of "Zee little grey cells" I do not recognise the male figure sitting down.

John, my father was Ben Lonsdale and he dead in 1969 during the Winter of discontent
Alan Lonsdale

lonsdale
13th December 2005, 18:31
John, my father was Ben Lonsdale and he died in1979 during the winter of discontent

lonsdale
13th December 2005, 18:32
John it was 79 sorry I put in 69 first time around

John Leary
13th December 2005, 20:50
Lonsdale
Nice to hear from you. Will send you a PM.
John

Harry Nicholson
13th December 2005, 23:21
A classic - just a pity Arthur Orum isn't in shot to complete the picture

Alan Marsden

Hello Alan,
Arthur Orum! Now theres a name from the past. I remember him as a large, lovely man and genial (funny that...I was told his Dad was an Icelander).
I wrote to him from the Marwarri with comments about my difficulties with that ship, which had the worst of reputations for rolling in swell (the pointer of the inclinometer or whatever it was called would sometimes be hitting the stops). The Marwarri had known a bad time, it spent 6 months on the seabed of the Bristol Channel having been the first ship to hit a magnetic mine. She was lifted and patched up, ships being in short supply at the time. Anyway she had her problems one of which caused me some difficulty.
In large seas the corner of the aft and starboard bulkheads of the wireless room would open up as she rolled, open up about an inch (I'm not overstating this... sometimes the stars could be seen through the gap). In the monsoons the water would come in and I would be bailing it out of the motor cupboard.

So after that trip I went on leave and expected a welding job to be done. When I got back ready for my next deep sea trip I was appalled to find things were the same. The day we sailed Arthur called on me and gave me a stirrup pump! It's true! And when I needed it in the tropics I found it did'nt work. To be fair to Arthur he probably thought I was making a fuss about nothing, in the light airs of Birkenhead dock he would not be able to see the gap open and close. Seriously though I was concerned, the lead cable runs in the motor cupboard were coated with green mould.

I'd also written from Calcutta and complained about the emergency receiver. It was a peculiar thing built from excessively large components in a wooden box with a couple of knobs and a couple of dials, painted grey and with the title "Brocklebank 1940". It was a "TRF" set, I used to fiddle with the quench controls and mostly got squeals and warbles and considered it useless. The day Arthur brought the stirrup pump I asked him about it. He said "during the war after we'd been torpedoed or were otherwise waiting for a ship, we were put in a shed on the dockside here and told to build receivers. That's one of them, that's why its called the '1940'; we found them fine, we could work the Panama Canal from the Bay of Bengal with them. My reply was to the effect that I could well believe it possible when most shipping was in radio silence, but the wavebands were now crammed with traffic and the Yanks were stuffing a kilowatt of power into their aerials whilst we had just a tenth of that. But he did send me 100 yards of lead covered cable so that I could rewire the wireless room at my leisure in Calcutta.
Even so I have fond memories of him, he did his best for us on what must have been a tight budget. Out of all the faces, Arthur's stands out with the clearest of them.
From my Brocklebanks experience I learned to become self reliant and innovative which would stand me well in my future life in TV studios.

Derek Roger
13th December 2005, 23:52
Great story Harry ; thanks for sharing it . Did you ever sail with or know Harry Jefferson ? Derek

Harry Nicholson
14th December 2005, 00:39
hello Derek,
I don't recall that name... mind you, some mornings I don't recall my own.
Just now I recall the 1st mate of the Marwarri was Bill Milne from Drumnadrochit
(I called into the post office there a few years ago and asked about him, the lady gave a knowing look and said he had gone to South Africa). My cabin was opposite Bill's and one day in bad weather a crate of his Tennants came crashing
through the door out of his office, sat on the crate was a very scared ships cat called "Jool Wallah". The Captain was Bill? Saxty who had come up from the deck and was a fine seaman; the pilot did not arrive once in Trincomalee but Saxty took us out without him, the water was very clear and I could see the scuttled ships which littered the channel, Captain Saxty seemed to be enjoying himself. In Trincomalee the agent took Bill Milne off to "shoot leopards" in the jungle at night, they spent the night on top of a war time fuel tank with bottles of whisky. The only thing they bagged was an unfortunate owl.
We had an amazing carpenter called Gustav, (he was Dutch), a really lovable rogue, he seemed to attract the police, I could write a book about his exploits.
We had an engineer from Carlisle, he annoyed someone so much that the chap tried to get at him by chopping down his cabin door with a fire axe.
The Purser was Pete Boggon, he was a very good feeder. But that's enough for now.
Altogether the Marwarri was an entertaining old thing.

Harry

Cunarder
15th December 2005, 13:48
Harry

Thanks for the story. I have very limited memories of Arthur apart from the fact that he interviewed me for my job with T&J's in 1968. Like you, I recall him as a larger than life person - the interview being more about the wonders I was about to have revealed to me as an employee of Brocklebanks rather than about my capabilities to fulfill the requirements! I believe that it wasn't much after this time that Angus assumed the mantle of Chief Poo-Bah....

Derek, I sailed with Harry Jefferson in later years on the passenger ships. Have posted some pix of him in this forum too somewhere. Let me know if you can't find them....

Cheers
Alan Marsden

lonsdale
16th December 2005, 18:30
Dear John thank you for your very kind P.M. concerning my father Ben Lonsdale he was slightly "ashamed" of me as I had a short stint with Elder Dempster Line.
Once again thanks.
Alan Lonsdale

John Leary
24th December 2005, 11:55
I recently purchased a Lloyds List International that celebrated the 150th anniversary of Cunard. Although I cannot find any publishing date I thinks this must have been produced in 1990. One article is of particular interest to me because it reports that the new trading name for Radio and Electronic Services was Marinet Systems. A name search on Google shows that Marinet System is trading from a Liverpool address but it also seems to be the case that it was taken over by an American Corporation Globe Wireless in 1999. The article reports that “Radio and Electronic Services was set up in the early 1970’s to provide services to other shipping companies. Radio Officers were provided for the off-shore oil companies and automation services to a wide range of shipping companies”

The Manager of the organisation at the time of article was Angus Macdonald.

I was wondering if any SN member is able to throw further light on the topic of the development of the company and its survival beyond the demise of the radio officer. I for one am delighted that it has adapted and survives to the present day .

Finally can I wish a very Merry Christmas to all SN members and particularly to all of you ex-Radio Officers out there.

John

A.G.Greenwood
2nd February 2006, 10:17
Think I must have been on the Marwarri the same time as you. Captain (Cyclone) Saxty, Gus Loedwik (with motor cycle), Bill Milne etc. Also Les Flockhart (Purser). Do you remember Pete Fuller 5th Engineer, I am trying to locate him.
Tony Greenwood (Apprentice & 4th Officer).

eldersuk
2nd February 2006, 11:55
Harry Nicholson mentions Purser Pete Boggon. Well Harry you will be glad to know that Pete is still going strong down in Perth, Oz, and attended a small Elder Dempster reunion there a couple of months back.

Derek

Harry Nicholson
2nd February 2006, 16:18
Think I must have been on the Marwarri the same time as you. Captain (Cyclone) Saxty, Gus Loedwik (with motor cycle), Bill Milne etc. Also Les Flockhart (Purser). Do you remember Pete Fuller 5th Engineer, I am trying to locate him.
Tony Greenwood (Apprentice & 4th Officer).

Well! This site is amazing and to think I almost packed it in! Anyway Tony, I'm raking around in what remnants of memory I have and trying to place you, any chance of a photo? I really value your post though, you have given me the surname of Gus Loedwig which is marvellous. Among all those I sailed with he stands out with his huge presence, a lovable and loyal rogue who made a staunch friend. Which Marwarri trip were you on, May-Nov 1960 or Dec60- April 61 ? On the first one my wife was with us as supernumery, the Purser was Pete Boggon, that was the trip when the Calcutta chandlers made our ship a gift of masses of bonded alcohol with decomposed labels out of a bonded store (been there for years). Gus was captured by the Madras customs lowering a load of it into a bum boat. We went home via the States, Savannah first. I recall that Gus had a motorbike with him and would drive around Calcutta on it, one day a plump lady of Calcutta riding pillion bounced off and landed in the grass on the Maidan.
Second trip Gus had his arm in a sling much of the time and was sent home from Calcutta on another ship I think. When we arrived in Liverpool he met us at the quayside with a new motor cycle and side car (wife sat inside) painted in Brocklebanks colours. On that second trip the Super flew out from UK and stopped the chipping of the hull in Kidderpore Dock, Marwarri was so rotten the chipping hammers were going through the bows. We had some new plates affixed and they sent us home, the bunkers were oozing through and down the plates! As she had been mined and sunk during the war I was beginning to lose confidence in her. On the way through the Med a freak wave hit us and set the windlass back three inches and we took a lot of water into the forward hold among 300 tons of Sudanese cotton... which was a bit of a worry. The masts whipped and my aerials came down, I fell out of my chair in the radio room and hurt a finger which troubled me for a good few years afterwards.
Bill Milne was the 1st mate (from Drumnadrochit) and Capt Saxty in charge on both trips. Capt Saxty for me is the 'bearer of the archetype' of the sea captain. Gus the carpenter does not fit any human type I've met before or since, he was unique.
Anyway which of those trips were you on the Marwarri... remind me please.
I would like to be prompted about Les Flockhart the purser... I can't seem to recall his face. On the first trip a Colin was 4th eng. a Jeff was chief eng, and Brian the 5th. The 2nd mate was also Colin. These are from photo's, I dont have surnames (do you?)
Anyway which of those trips were you on?

Harry Nicholson
2nd February 2006, 16:28
Harry Nicholson mentions Purser Pete Boggon. Well Harry you will be glad to know that Pete is still going strong down in Perth, Oz, and attended a small Elder Dempster reunion there a couple of months back.

Derek
Hello Derek,
Thats great to hear, I often wonder where he is and have imagined him running some fine pub and restaurant in a posh part of Cheshire. So he is in Perth WA! Its amazing how everyone has dispersed around the globe.
Have you some way of sending Pete the warmest regards of myself and Beryl (my wife who did a trip with us on Marwarri)?.

A.G.Greenwood
2nd February 2006, 23:55
Got quite a few photographs but not of sufficient quality to send. My Marwarri trip was from late 1960 to early 1961. (The exact dates have been left out of my discharge book for some reason). I remember the beer quite well (unless we had a different lot). It was in boxes, no labels, likely heineki, and not to be touched until clear of sand heads. Have a marvellous Gus Loedwik story, too long tonight but definitely on a future occasion. Another name - do you remember Dave Courtenay. 2nd R/O? Where are you living now? I still do a bit of marine consultancy work after leaving Esso when I terminated my sea going career. Living in Lymington on South Coast. Somewhere in my attic I have the names of all those I have sailed with. I'll look them out. Tony Greenwood

eldersuk
3rd February 2006, 00:17
Harry,

Will send Peter's address by PM

Derek

eldersuk
3rd February 2006, 00:46
Harry

Peter Boggon (2nd left) Perth Hyatt, Nov. 2005

Harry Nicholson
3rd February 2006, 16:17
Thanks for that Derek, its great to see him. Here is a picture of us having dinner at Maxims (air cond. restuarant) in the Grand Hotel, Calcutta. L to R is Colin 4th eng. Peter Boggon purser, Beryl my wife and then me ist R/0 ss Marwarri;1960.
Notice how Pete is leaning his head to his right just as in your picture.

Harry Nicholson
4th February 2006, 15:22
Got quite a few photographs but not of sufficient quality to send. My Marwarri trip was from late 1960 to early 1961. (The exact dates have been left out of my discharge book for some reason). I remember the beer quite well (unless we had a different lot). It was in boxes, no labels, likely heineki, and not to be touched until clear of sand heads. Have a marvellous Gus Loedwik story, too long tonight but definitely on a future occasion. Another name - do you remember Dave Courtenay. 2nd R/O? Where are you living now? I still do a bit of marine consultancy work after leaving Esso when I terminated my sea going career. Living in Lymington on South Coast. Somewhere in my attic I have the names of all those I have sailed with. I'll look them out. Tony Greenwood
Hello Tony,
I do recall Dave Courtenay now you have given his name. He was on his first sea trip with us, a fair haired chubby young fellow. We lost the main transmitter coming into the Hughli, the output valve... a huge beam tetrode had failed. We had two spares. As Dave passed me the first one he dropped it! Bust!
He passed me the second one, I installed it and as I was applying the anode connection the top cap snapped off! What to do now?
I sat down with the valve wrapped in towels held between my knees, my face wrapped in towels and goggles on. Then very slowly filed sufficient glass away from the pip to expose a tiny bit of connection wire. Then Dave and I gingerly soldered the top cap back on and very carefully installed it..... and we were on air again... phew!.
It was not only beer we got from the chandler, I had a dozen bottles of bacardi and a dozen bottles of gin in my wardrobe. There was a good deal of vintage French wine going the rounds as well as champagne. That trip was a bit special.
I hope you post the crew list and some pictures when you get into your attic.
I'm in Whitby, Yorks. have alook at my profile.
regards
Harry

Tony Selman
8th March 2006, 18:22
Almost unbelievably because I am very internet literate I have only just found this site. What a find. I started by doing a quick search on "Brocklebank" and have been happily reading for the last hour or so. I intended to post comments on lots of threads but briefly I wanted to say hello here.

Arthur Orum recruited me in March 1964. I had just got my 1st Class ticket at Riversdale and just wandered in to Cunard Building and asked if there were any jobs. Whoever was on reception introduced me to Arthur and I spent an hour or so being interviewed, was introduced to Ben Lonsdale which I presume was the final stamp of approval, and then told I had got a job. I joined the Matra in Royal Albert Dock 10 days later and there met Gordon Caddy for the first time.

I didn't have much to to do with Ben Lonsdale but he always seemed very gentlemanly, I thought the world of Arthur but never seemed to get on very well with Gordon. When Bill Curry went ashore I thought he was great and he tried briefly to get me to consider going ashore in 1970 but I wasn't cut out for that. I was greatly saddened to hear about his death.

I look forward to many happy hours renewing acquaintances on here.

Harry Nicholson
8th March 2006, 21:04
Welcome Tony, I left before you joined. I'd like to do it all again but nobody wants beam tetrodes these days.

Tony Selman
9th March 2006, 20:52
Thanks Harry. I liked your beam tetrode story but not as much as the one where you had loads of ex bonded booze from Cal. What sort of trip is that? Probably the only trip in your life where you had a relatively low bar bill I'll wager? (Pint)

oglebilluk
15th March 2006, 15:43
Have only just noticed this posting.
Pete Fuller must be the one I knew at Riversdale College when we started training in 1955. I heard that he went ashore and joined the Glasgow police, probably soon after the Marwarri.
I remember that her nickname was "more worry" and once coasted on her to Birkenhead
Also Capt Saxby was Mate on Matra in about 1958 - 59; he was always singing "my canary's got circles under his eyes". Why do we remember such stuff?

Bill

Cunarder
19th March 2006, 08:47
Probably because, at heart, we wish we were still there - sometimes I certainly do!

mkitt
21st June 2006, 22:27
A classic - just a pity Arthur Orum isn't in shot to complete the picture

Alan Marsden

Never thought I'd see those faces again - some stories in there such as Dennis Williamson being stopped by the police en route to Southampton with a 9' radar scanner strapped to the top of his car! As for Mike Norton, well.....

noel grayson
2nd September 2006, 01:13
Thanks for that Derek, its great to see him. Here is a picture of us having dinner at Maxims (air cond. restuarant) in the Grand Hotel, Calcutta. L to R is Colin 4th eng. Peter Boggon purser, Beryl my wife and then me ist R/0 ss Marwarri;1960.
Notice how Pete is leaning his head to his right just as in your picture.

Now that is how I remember Pete Boggon, who was 2nd Steward on the Macharda with me, John Picquet being the Purser/Ch Stwd.
Anyone heard the whereabouts of John?

michael james
2nd September 2006, 12:33
Also Capt Saxby was Mate on Matra in about 1958 - 59; he was always singing "my canary's got circles under his eyes". Why do we remember such stuff? oglebilluk

Bill,
If you were on the Matra in `58 -`59 we definately sailed together as she was my home from Aug `58 for a year (2 trips) Master Capt Tom Fox-Lloyd.

"Cyclone" had quite a repertoire of ditties did`nt he, "Beans beans good for the heart.......the rest must be censored" as he ambled into the Saloon with looks of questioning approval at what us apprentices were eating at our small table in the corner.....

Roger Bentley
18th September 2006, 16:56
Hello. My name is Roger Bentley and I was 1R/O on the Magdapur for a voyage commencing 31 October 1958 ending 26 May 1959. Dave Courtenay was the second R/O and I am pretty sure that was his first ship in Brocks. He was a small rather shy chap from the Manchester area I think. Reading all the messages with great interes. Wish I had joined earlier. Regards. Roger

Tony Selman
18th September 2006, 17:26
Welcome Bentley Sahib. For those of you who don't know Roger is a stalwart of The Radio Officers' Association and has been editor of QSO for numerous years. He has just hung up his typewriter and I am sure he will spend many hours on here with his new found time!

Roger Bentley
18th September 2006, 18:11
Thank You Tony, For the publicity! I wish to correct one point in my last message, the Courtenay I sailed with was called Desmond, Des for short. Still catching up. Ek Dum Thikai Sahibs. Regards, Roger Bentley

tedc
31st December 2006, 17:11
[QUOTE=Harry Nicholson;25589]hello Derek,
<< I don't recall that name... mind you, some mornings I don't recall my own.
Just now I recall the 1st mate of the Marwarri was Bill Milne from Drumnadrochit>>

Sounds like the same Bill Milne who had been a 2nd Mate during my day ...very smooth...good with the ladies! Liked the odd dram!

ted

Allan Holmes
22nd March 2007, 23:24
My very first ship in Brocks was 2nd R/O on the Manipur/GBJZ in early 1958. The Chief R/O was Roger Goodson. On walking up the gangway the first person I met was the 1st Mate Billy Milne (AKA Drumnadrochet) lying in the alleyway with a large rifle (unloaded) trying out his aim. Behind him was the
2nd mate Tom Parry practicing his golf swing. They were an interesting pair and immediately introduced me to Tenants Lager which was 6d a can. What a way to start my seagoing career. I never looked back.

Roger Bentley
23rd March 2007, 19:44
Alan, I replied to your private message. Did you get it? Regards, Roger Bentley

Derek Roger
24th March 2007, 03:25
Well! This site is amazing and to think I almost packed it in! Anyway Tony, I'm raking around in what remnants of memory I have and trying to place you, any chance of a photo? I really value your post though, you have given me the surname of Gus Loedwig which is marvellous. Among all those I sailed with he stands out with his huge presence, a lovable and loyal rogue who made a staunch friend. Which Marwarri trip were you on, May-Nov 1960 or Dec60- April 61 ? On the first one my wife was with us as supernumery, the Purser was Pete Boggon, that was the trip when the Calcutta chandlers made our ship a gift of masses of bonded alcohol with decomposed labels out of a bonded store (been there for years). Gus was captured by the Madras customs lowering a load of it into a bum boat. We went home via the States, Savannah first. I recall that Gus had a motorbike with him and would drive around Calcutta on it, one day a plump lady of Calcutta riding pillion bounced off and landed in the grass on the Maidan.
Second trip Gus had his arm in a sling much of the time and was sent home from Calcutta on another ship I think. When we arrived in Liverpool he met us at the quayside with a new motor cycle and side car (wife sat inside) painted in Brocklebanks colours. On that second trip the Super flew out from UK and stopped the chipping of the hull in Kidderpore Dock, Marwarri was so rotten the chipping hammers were going through the bows. We had some new plates affixed and they sent us home, the bunkers were oozing through and down the plates! As she had been mined and sunk during the war I was beginning to lose confidence in her. On the way through the Med a freak wave hit us and set the windlass back three inches and we took a lot of water into the forward hold among 300 tons of Sudanese cotton... which was a bit of a worry. The masts whipped and my aerials came down, I fell out of my chair in the radio room and hurt a finger which troubled me for a good few years afterwards.
Bill Milne was the 1st mate (from Drumnadrochit) and Capt Saxty in charge on both trips. Capt Saxty for me is the 'bearer of the archetype' of the sea captain. Gus the carpenter does not fit any human type I've met before or since, he was unique.
Anyway which of those trips were you on the Marwarri... remind me please.
I would like to be prompted about Les Flockhart the purser... I can't seem to recall his face. On the first trip a Colin was 4th eng. a Jeff was chief eng, and Brian the 5th. The 2nd mate was also Colin. These are from photo's, I dont have surnames (do you?)
Anyway which of those trips were you on?

Would the Chief Engineer be Geoff Guest ? and the 2nd Mate Colin Kingston from Doncaster ??
" Drum "was quite well known as he carried his 12 G/G shotgun with him and apparently have the crew throw empty beer cans( which were in plentifull suppy ) up over the side "to keep his eye in " There was a yarn he shot a seagull or albatros by mistake and the old man threw a fit !

Derek

Tony Selman
11th April 2007, 18:11
I was recently contacted by a fine gentlemen aged 88 who had been at sea as an R/O with Brock's during the war. He was enquiring about Tony Sprigings' book and was keen to chat about old times.

His name was Peter Stuart and he sounded very sprightly. I may not have this story completely correct but he had coasted with Ben Lonsdale and was due to go deep sea on Maidan (I think, Peter told me the ship but to my fury I am not now completely sure which one ) but Ben was due to be CR/O on another ship and wanted Peter to go with him. Peter was duly replaced and left the Brock's ship which sadly was sunk during the voyage - if it was indeed Maidan it would have been sunk by Admiral Scheer. I told him Ben had been in charge of the Radio and Electronics Department at the time of my recruitment and Peter's words to me were "I owe my life to Ben Lonsdale". A poignant memory indeed.

Allan Holmes
11th April 2007, 21:22
Alan, I replied to your private message. Did you get it? Regards, Roger Bentley


Yes Roger. Got it. Been away so just catching up a bit.

Allan(A)

sparkie2182
22nd May 2007, 00:16
anyone remember harry????????????????


sparkie2182

gwzm
23rd May 2007, 00:15
Hello sparkie2182,

I sailed with Harry on the Mahseer/GZSV when I was a first trip Chota Marconi Sahib in 1963. A great guy who taught me a lot. He was always making up little ditties or translating nursery rhymes into pidgin hindi, mostly unprintable in a genteel forum like this

= bv John + VA

sparkie2182
25th May 2007, 00:15
i sailed wih harry as 2 r/o in the mid 70s on the act boats.
he was from beverley in yorkshire, and was great with me.... taught me everything ,really.
he was regarded as a bit of a loner by most of the crew, and was quite eccentric in many ways.
i wonder if others on the board remember him...........


73s


sparkie2182

Cunarder
25th May 2007, 06:06
Hi there Sparkie

I sailed with Harry on the Cunard Princess/C6CG - I have posted a photo from that time in the Gallery. A great bloke...!

73
Alan Marsden

John Leary
25th May 2007, 20:14
Hi Sparkie
I sailed with Harry as 2nd R/O on two deep sea voyages on Mahseer in 1963 and 1964 and there are a couple of stories of my experiences
with him posted in the Brocklebank forum. He was an extremely helpful and supportive chief and someone who was extremely patient particularly
with nervous first trippers. As you say he lived in Beverley and at the time I sailed with him had a young wife and small daughter who I guess now would be a mother in her own right. I never saw Harry as a loner as he was always extremely sociable but he did not join in with all of the social drinking in the bar that represented the off-duty social life of Mahseer,
particularly when Captain Nuttall was master. I will always remember his great sense of humour and the trouble he went to on the last voyage I spent with him to get a coffee table that he had made in Colombo on-board and off-loaded in London when we returned to the UK. It was good to see how he
progressed as the company changed but I have never learnt what happened to him as the fleet diminished. Perhaps he retired before the very end. He was a smashing guy and someone I will always remember with great affection.
Regards
John

sparkie2182
25th May 2007, 23:45
many thanks john and alan

i enjoyed the photo of harry in the cramped radio shack on the princess.
makes the radio room of the act ships seem palatial.
when i last saw harry.....i was on the dockside in glv.......seaforth

he was dispatched to home, and i took over the ship.....promoted from 2 r/o to senior.
he was to go on to join the cunard princess......and.....if i remember rightly....one of the fruit ships we bought from salem.
his last months on the act run were less than happy for him, a constant feud with the ships master being a daily problem.
i hope his time on the princess was happier for him.....i have the best memories of him as a lovely man.......patient and concientious (maybe too conciencious).

he was a former royal navy man.........and spent so long in the merchant service.....he was the kind of guy we will always need.


best regards to all cunardsteam sparkies..........


allan


p.s.......i remember him telling me.....when he was discharged from the r.n. he took up painting and decorating. it was not too long before he fell off his ladder, and decided to go to m.n. wireless college instead.....his love of ladders having diminished somewhat.
so....had it not been for an accident, we may never have known him.

John Ringrose
3rd June 2008, 11:43
I liked Ken Fawcett a great deal. Whilst on the refit team coasting a lot of ships Ken would often come down for a chat and a few!!!! - beers - Gentleman - is he still alive?

radioman1969
8th February 2011, 01:55
Hello. Just found this thread. I was with RES 1975-1987.

Anybody know if the office staff at Liverpool (Bill Curry/Angus MacDonald/Ken Fawcett/Thelma etc) are still with us ?

Also anybody know if 'Ginger' Brown - capt with Port Line - is still alive ?

How about Les Flockhart (Purser) ? Sailed with him on Lustrous/Cunard Cavalier - what trips !

There are many other names which will come back to me eventually - Capt 'Tombstone' Twomey etc.

Regards
Ken