SS Morea

benjidog
28th October 2005, 01:25
I am researching SS Morea - launched in 1908 and scrapped in Japan in 1930. I have a potte history from the book 20th Century Passenger Ships of the P&O by Neil McCart and a fair collection of postcards. I am particularly interested in Morea because my grandfather served on her as a steward before WW1. My postcard collection contains a couple of cards he sent home from the ship and a lot of cards from the various ports of call. I would be interested to hear from anyone else that might be researching Morea or who may have any useful information about her.
I am attaching a picture for anyone that may be interested.

Bruce Carson
28th October 2005, 01:42
Hi Benjidog,
Welcome on board, it's a nice place to be. Enjoy the pictures and postings and the camaraderie between members.
There are a couple of pictures in the Gallery of activities on board the 'Morea' in the last year of her service.
Fancy Dress Ball Sep 30 05
P&O's Morea Aug 10 05

Best,
Bruce C.

thunderd
28th October 2005, 03:00
Welcome to the site Benjidog, I hope you enjoy it and I'm sure that more information will be forthcoming to you.

R58484956
28th October 2005, 14:50
Welcome to the site Benjidog, enjoy all it has to offer plus of course you are now amongst the sea/ship loving fraternity.

Bob S
28th October 2005, 21:01
Ref: P&O A Fleet History.

MOREA (Passenger Liner 1908 - 1930)
Official number 128235.
Tonnage 10890 grt
Passengers 407 1st class, 200 2nd class.
Cost 309,692.
Launched 15/08/08 by Barclay, Curle & Co Ltd, Glasgow (yard number 471) for P&O. Sailed from builders yard 05/11/08.
Sailed from Sydney for London on 07/09/14 but owing to the threat of the German cruiser EMDEN, the Lascar deck crew refused to serve beyond Bombay and they were replaced by a company of Royal Engineers who had embarked at Colombo for the remaining voyage to Tilbury.
Sold for 32,500 on the 03/09/30 to Summers & Co for demolition at Kobe, Japan.

benjidog
30th October 2005, 16:04
Robert,
Thank you for the information about the sale for scrap. I guess Japan was a centre for scrapping old vessels in the first half of the 20th Century as a lot of ships I looked up seem to have ended their life there. I guess this is done in India nowadays as there was a program about this on TV pointing out the dangers to the people doing the work due to poor working conditions and the chemicals etc.
Regards,
Benjidog

benjidog
30th October 2005, 17:23
HI Bruce,
Thanks for the pointer to the pictures. Could you let me know more about the Fancy Dress Ball picture you uploaded - was it a photo or a postcard and how do you know it was taken in 1930? This is particularly interesting as Morea was scrapped in 1930 and if the date is correct the picture must have been taken fairly shortly before she went to the breakers in Kobe.
It is also interesting to see people sitting quite happily on the wooden decking. Passengers these days would expect fitted carpets and even then would probably not want to sit on the floor! In fact this is one of a very small number of pictures I have seen of Morea's interior
------------
Benjidog

Hi Benjidog,
Welcome on board, it's a nice place to be. Enjoy the pictures and postings and the camaraderie between members.
There are a couple of pictures in the Gallery of activities on board the 'Morea' in the last year of her service.
Fancy Dress Ball Sep 30 05
P&O's Morea Aug 10 05

Best,
Bruce C.

froggie
12th November 2005, 20:39
benjidog

The badges you have from P&O ships were probably attached to souveniers sold on board they were probably attached to a tankard or napkin ring. Now, in 2005, they are probably quite valuable.

Best wishes, 'froggie' - Nelson French

benjidog
13th November 2005, 15:32
Thanks for your comment about badges Froggie - that is very interesting. I thought they couldn't be cap badges really as all the ones I have ever seen have been fabric with lots of braiding - and a lot bigger. It never occurred to me that they might be on napkin rings or tankards, but this would explain the curved shape.

I don't know whether they are valuable or not but I have no intention of selling them. Maybe I will donate them to the NMM when I kick the bucket.

benjidog

The badges you have from P&O ships were probably attached to souveniers sold on board they were probably attached to a tankard or napkin ring. Now, in 2005, they are probably quite valuable.

Best wishes, 'froggie' - Nelson French

Bruce Carson
13th November 2005, 15:57
Hello benjidog:
I'm sorry for not replying to you sooner, but I somehow missed your posting.
My father's first job abroad was as an engineer on a tin mining dredger in what was then the Federated States of Malaya in 1930. To be quite honest, the voyage could possibly have been at the end of 1929 or even straddled the two years 1929-30, but I'm not sure of the exact dates.
Most of his pictures have been lost or damaged over the years, but a few survive.
The personal snapshots taken by my father and his friends in the thirties are all small format, as would be expected of photographs of the period. There are pictures of two Fancy Dress Balls onboard and these pictures are large format and obviously taken with a better quality instrument, perhaps a press camera. Probably a crew member (Purser?) was assigned the duty of taking pictures and either selling or distributing them amongst the passengers.
He came home on furlough and then made another voyage out and home before the beginning of the war. His experience on board the 'Morea' was not to his liking--she, as you know was on her last year of service, and he switched to the newer Dutch liners 'Dempo' and 'Baloeran' for his later trips.
As a babe in arms, I made it home on the 'Baloeran' just before the War began.
I think you basically made your own entertainment on those ships. A deck chair and a small library and maybe a game of cards to while away the time, was about it. An event like the Fancy Dress Ball was the highlight of the voyage.
Does being employed on a tin dredger make him a member of the British Merchant Marine? :-).

Bruce C.

Paedrig
7th January 2006, 12:09
Bit of a belated response but I've only just joined this Forum having picked up on Morea whist doing something else. As usualy happens with me! Anyway a few years back whilst picking up some ships stuff I came across what appeared to be a small souvenir decorated lifebelt for SS Morea with a photo of the ship in the centre, having magpie tendencies I stowed it away. Is it any use to you given your interest in the vessel? I wouldnt be too happy to see it on e-bay and rather it had a proper home.

Hugh MacLean
9th March 2006, 17:27
Brian,

I presume they are talking about RMS Morea rather than HMS here.

From todays (9/3/2005) UK Press.


Sailor fought in both conflicts

Hero Kenneth Cummins has reached the age of 106 - after surviving fighting in BOTH World Wars.

Kenneth witnessed the horrors of the 1914-1918 and 1939-1945 conflicts while serving at sea.

He survived German torpedo attacks and a sinking before going on to become a cruise liner captain.

And this week the dad-of-four celebrated his birthday at home with Aussie wife Rosemary, 76 - and a cuppa.

Kenneth was just 14 and living with his parents at Southport, Merseyside, when the Great War began.

Too young to fight he left school at 15 and joined a training corps for steamship company P & O before being called aboard HMS Worcester.
In 1917 he was drafted into the Royal Navy aboard warship HMS Morea as a gunner, protecting Atlantic convoys.

It was on that vessel that he saw one of his most horrific sights. He said: "The Germans had sunk a British hospital ship in the Bristol Channel and we were sailing through floating bodies. It was something we could never have imagined."

Rosemary said at their home in Great Bedwyn, Wilts: "Kenneth has had an amazing life."

An amazing story Happy Birthday Kenneth.

Rgds

benjidog
9th March 2006, 19:02
Hugh,

Thanks for spotting this and passing it on.

I read about this remarkable chap in the newspaper a couple of weeks ago and mentioned it to TMac. I was amazed to find that there was someone still alive who served on a ship that was broken up 75 years ago!

Morea was initiallly a "Royal Mail Ship" but got requisitioned by the Navy - and eventually returned to P&O. During her period of service with the RN she was called HMS Morea. This is indeed the same ship that I am researching - I am going to write to the old chap and try to find out if he has recorded anything about his experiences.

Regards,

Brian

Dilys de Haan
24th May 2011, 21:00
Hi Guys I have added a photo of the baggage label
Maybe this will get me some where

D

Bluebluesdancer
3rd April 2012, 06:26
I am researching SS Morea - launched in 1908 and scrapped in Japan in 1930. I have a potte history from the book 20th Century Passenger Ships of the P&O by Neil McCart and a fair collection of postcards. I am particularly interested in Morea because my grandfather served on her as a steward before WW1. My postcard collection contains a couple of cards he sent home from the ship and a lot of cards from the various ports of call. I would be interested to hear from anyone else that might be researching Morea or who may have any useful information about her.
I am attaching a picture for anyone that may be interested.

Hi!
I was just down in my basement and rediscovered something that I got from my Great-Grandmother's estate. It is a little silver 'cauldron' with a 'loop' handle that swivels and the RMS Morea insignia and flag attached to the front. It stands about 1.5 inches tall, and is about 2 inches in diameter. I can't find my camera at the moment, otherwise I'd attach a photo!
So I was wondering if you have heard of any other little cauldron mementos from that particular ship, and if there would be any way of nailing-down the date that it was likely have been sold to them?
I'm also wondering whether there is any chance that the passenger lists could be available, since there is a slight chance that it could have been acquired by my Great-Great Grandparents on one of their trips to and from Australia (my Great-Great Grandfather was a Scottish banker, and my great-great grandmother was born in Autralia). It's more likely that is was my Great Grandfather and my Great Grandmother since they also traveled a lot, but their travels were more in India and China, since my Great-Grandfather was an engineer and designed and built a lot of bridges in the middle east back during The Raj.
Any help you can give would be appreciated.
Thank you very much,
Sincerely,
Heather Bryse-Harvey

R58484956
3rd April 2012, 17:07
Greetings Heather and welcome to SN. Bon voyage.

plo1234
3rd December 2012, 05:46
Hey I know this posts really old but hopefully somebody can point me in the right direction here. I was snorkling earlier this year at Moreton Island I am afraid I don't remember where and I came across a quarter of a plate. On the front it has a bit of a floral design composed of green dots. On the back it shows W. F. & Co. MOREA which is surrounded by some kind of navy looking belt. Could anyone help me out here. Is this in fact a piece of cutlery from the S.S. Morea or something else?
Cheers, Plo