Malvernian

clibb
28th March 2010, 18:50
My mother's first husband, Rowland Starling, was lost when the Malvernian was sunk in 1941. He was the R/O. There isn't a lot of detail on this event, and I wondered if anyone had any references they could point me to.

Regards


Nick Clibborn

non descript
28th March 2010, 18:53
Nick, a warm, if slightly belated, welome to you - let's see what we can turn up for you. (Thumb)

non descript
28th March 2010, 18:56
Nick; I am assuming you either own this page (http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~starling/Genealogy/DebtOfHonour/RowlandScottStarling.html)or have at least seen it?

clibb
28th March 2010, 19:53
Thanks, Tonga. No I don't own it, but I had seen it, and deeply appreciated the sentiment. There are one or two accounts of individuals in the sinking, but no mention of Rowland Starling, and hence my query.

Nick

eriskay
28th March 2010, 20:15
Thanks, Tonga. No I don't own it, but I had seen it, and deeply appreciated the sentiment. There are one or two accounts of individuals in the sinking, but no mention of Rowland Starling, and hence my query.

Nick


I must be missing something - the 'memorial' notice that Tonga posted does in fact include the name of Rowland Scott Starling of the MMS Malvernian ?


Anyway, the 3,133 GRT ex-Ellerman & Papayanni liner 'Malvernian' was requisitioned by the Admiralty on 24th August 1940 to serve the country as an Armed Boarding Vessel, for which role she was duly armed and commissioned as a Royal Navy unit on 1st January 1941. (The role of these Armed Boarding Vessels was to stop merchant shipping approaching Europe to inspect and impose the blockage rules)

The 'Malvernian', a product of the shipyard of William Gray & Company of West Hartlepool, was attacked by German aircraft off the coast of Spain on 11th of July 1941, set on fire, and was abandoned by her complement. She did not sink immediately, however, and was seen afloat and drifting on 19th July when she was finally sunk.

Meantime, her Captain, along with 31 others of her crew, made a landing in one of the boats at Corunna on 21st July, and a second boat, with about 25 persons on board, made a landing the following day, at Vigo.

The remaining 107 survivors were captured by enemy minesweepers (German) when they were nearing land.

Checking my other sources to see whether I can find any further details or confirmation.


Angus

eriskay
28th March 2010, 22:04
Never really came across much more but here are a few points :

I came across several (four) other losses from HMS Malvernian, but these all record 1st July 1941 as the loss date. It would therefore appear that she was attacked more than once in the month of July, the first time on 01-07-1941 whilst serving as an escort to Convoy OG66 off the Spanish coastline. She came under attack from a Focker-Wulff Condor aircraft and clearly there was damage and loss of life. (Commander JMS Robertson RNR in command)

She then appears to have succumbed the the final attack by ememy aircraft in that same month, as previously detailed, but there are conflicting versions of when it actually took place, although it would appear to be 11th July, whilst she was finally sunk only on 19th July, having drifted but still afloat, abandoned, until then.

Strangely, however, I have found no further records or reports of loss of life in the last attack, on the contrary the impression is given that everyone got away in the boats. Also, I was unable to find any mention of R. S. Starling in the Commonwelath War Grave Records.

Apparaently Document Reference ADM.199/1175, a Report covering the Loss of the Malvernian, is held at the National Archives at Kew.

Also, there is also a audio recording held at the Imperial War Museum of one of the ship's officers (James Moran) describing the attack on the vessel, her sinking, his capture and subsequent escape from a POW Camp, and his later incaceration at Colditz after being caught again.

Finally, an excellent photograph of this Ellerman Papayanni cargo ship may be found on the Old Ship Picture Gallery website (www.photoship.co.uk)

Good luck with your continuing searches,

Angus

Hugh MacLean
28th March 2010, 22:23
Strangely, however, I have found no further records or reports of loss of life in the last attack, on the contrary the impression is given that everyone got away in the boats. Also, I was unable to find any mention of R. S. Starling in the Commonwelath War Grave Records.

Angus

Angus, There was no loss of life on the last attack.

Second Radio Officer Starling was lost on 1st July 1941 here is his memoriam:
http://www.cwgc.org/search/casualty_details.aspx?casualty=2499580

Regards

eriskay
28th March 2010, 22:37
Evening, Hugh :

I suspected as much, but when I checked out the CWGC site I could not locate him, although you seem to have succeeded okay. I checked it again and I still cannot bring up that record. I tried variants of input, checked spellings, etc, but no joy. Also, I have never before seen the initials shown after the surname, on the surname line, per your message. I tried inputting that to see if it changed anything - nothing doing. However, I digress, well done for resolving that mystery.

Angus.

clibb
29th March 2010, 11:55
Yes, and thanks to all. I, too, had the same problem bringing up the record, and hence my original question. I also tried bringing up 199/1175, but the content I got was not specific to Malvernian. Thanks, too for the note on the Imperial War Museum, that's a real opportunity.

Nick

Andy McGregor
11th April 2013, 22:55
Hello, My Paternal Grandfather, GO McGregor was the First Engineer on his ship and I have come across an interesting account of the sinking of the ship. I never met my grandfather, but my father always talked about how he said never be in a rush to abandon a ship as often they stay afloat a long time. I have a flimsy carbon copy of a report apparently written shortly after he returned to the UK after the sinking.
The last couple of paragraphs show he had a similar sense of humor to me:
"The two petrol driven ARP centrigugal pumps supplied last time at the base (June) were supplied without discharge hoses or nozzels, and ship's hoses and connections were quite useless for same. Had discharge hoses and nozzels been supplied, these pumps may have controlled the fire, and therby given me a chance to work in the Engine roon and Stokehold.

The wireless set, radiogram and extension speakers, supplied in May at the BAse, were quite useless either for amusement or as a weapon. This set was supplied without the necessary rotary convertor.
The cinamatograph supplied at the base in June was quite useless as a means of entertainment, or for fighting the enemy, or the ensuing fire"

I have tried to attach scans of the document in case thay are of interest to others. Hope quality/size works for this forum. If you send me a message I can try and send them in a different form if that helps.

My naval experience is confined to 30yrs ago as a Royal Engineer officer sailing on the RFA Sir Bedivere to the Falklands conflict. The experience of being bombed is unpleasant when close inshore, it must have been a desparate struggle out in the Bay of Biscay.

Andy McGregor
11th April 2013, 22:58
It seems it is only possible to attach 5 files to a pst so here is the first page.

Hugh MacLean
14th April 2013, 20:28
Thanks for posting this Andy.

Regards
Hugh