M.v. Egidia/gjzd

Ian
28th April 2004, 18:28
The M.V. EGIDIA of 9,952 grt was built by Lithgow's of Port Glasgow in 1945. Following WW2 there were no plans to build bigger and better ships for the Atlantic service. Two cargo-passenger and a cargo vessel were, however, in the process of being built. The first two were delivered and went into service in 1945, the EGIDIA in June and the ELYSIA in November. EGIDIA made her maiden voyage to Calcutta and other eastern ports for the Joint India, Ceylon and Burma Conference which operated under the Ministry of Transport. The third of the same class and practically identical ship was the EUCADIA which ultimately joined EGIDIA and ELYSIA on the Atlantic service.
These three ships had accommodation for 12 passengers in single cabins and eventually finished their careers carrying general cargo between Glasgow, Liverpool, Milford Haven, Avonmouth, Aden, Vereval, Porbander, Bedi Bhunda, Karachi and Bombay.

geoffakelly
20th October 2004, 20:06
The M.V. EGIDIA of 9,952 grt was built by Lithgow's of Port Glasgow in 1945. Following WW2 there were no plans to build bigger and better ships for the Atlantic service. Two cargo-passenger and a cargo vessel were, however, in the process of being built. The first two were delivered and went into service in 1945, the EGIDIA in June and the ELYSIA in November. EGIDIA made her maiden voyage to Calcutta and other eastern ports for the Joint India, Ceylon and Burma Conference which operated under the Ministry of Transport. The third of the same class and practically identical ship was the EUCADIA which ultimately joined EGIDIA and ELYSIA on the Atlantic service.
These three ships had accommodation for 12 passengers in single cabins and eventually finished their careers carrying general cargo between Glasgow, Liverpool, Milford Haven, Avonmouth, Aden, Vereval, Porbander, Bedi Bhunda, Karachi and Bombay.
this ship was the first ship i joined in manchester docks in 1980 we sailed to aden karachi and bombay the the ship was sold and we were put ashore at flushing offshore limits the crew on deck was a somalie crew and i was a bright eyed 16 year old the ship was very old but as every one told me "she was chatty but happy" i spent another 20 years at sea so she must of left a impression on me..god was there cockroaches on that ship..... :dudette:

joesoap
4th September 2005, 20:16
Hi Ian
The Egidia was my first ship too. That was back in 1957 . She was requisitiond by the government for the Suez crisis and believe me that was a great experience and a trip not to be forgotten. I remember it well and have plenty yarns to spin on that first trip alone which turned out to be 4 months 21days but I signed off and on again in Glasgow for a second trip so I had nine months on her and look back on the rough and the smooth with pleasure. I was also on the Anchor lines Tyria . she ran the states with the whisky from Yorkhill Quey Glasgow and there lies a few tales to tell as well. I'm glad the old Egidia was still steaming up until the Eighties as I was led to believe she was razor blades long before that. Regards Joesoap

firey
1st December 2005, 22:18
Hi Joesoap,
I also sailed on the egidia and you were right the egidia in the picture was scrapped before the eighties. I sailed on her namesake 1978 and she was 7868 GRT according to my discharge book.

Robinj
1st December 2005, 23:46
It seems the Egidia was everybodys first ship. She was mine in1961, on the run to Bombay then upto Karachi. Joined her in Glasgow. I believe she eventually became the Benhope

Dave Edge
2nd December 2005, 00:16
The "Egidia" in the photo was sold to Ben Line in 1962 and renamed "Benhope" and broken up at Kaohsiung in 1972. The later "Egidia" was built by Bartrams in 1962 as the "Avisfaith" and renamed "Egidia" in 1977 when bought by Runciman, who owned Anchor Line at the time. 1981 sold, renamed "Sea Victory", 1982 "Southdene", 1984 "Asther", 1985 broken up in Spain.

R58484956
2nd December 2005, 12:49
Welcome geoffakelly to SN enjoy the site and all it has to offer

helen
18th February 2006, 20:20
Was Ben Line a Greek line? If not, was the 1st Egidia ever taken over by a Greek company after 1961/2?

Thanks.

albatross1923
12th December 2006, 16:26
MV Egidia
my first ship to joined as 6th engr Glasgow July1947 sailed on all the E Boats and C Boats ALBATROSS1923

treeve
12th December 2006, 16:32
Egidia was one of the ships which my Uncle Basil sailed with, and I am in the midst of writing up the CRS10 and the various ships he was on.
Best Wishes, Raymond

IanAM
1st March 2007, 15:06
The later "Egidia" was built by Bartrams in 1962 as the "Avisfaith" and renamed "Egidia" in 1977 when bought by Runciman, who owned Anchor Line at the time. 1981 sold, renamed "Sea Victory", 1982 "Southdene", 1984 "Asther", 1985 broken up in Spain.

Somewhere along the line between starting her life as 'Avisfaith' and becoming 'Egidia' this ship carried the name 'Alexandros B'. This name was much in evidence about the ship on drawings and plans when I was in her Sept.- Dec., '79. It was a standing joke aboard that Anchor Line had bought a ship back from the Greeks.

Moulder
17th May 2007, 16:09
It was the callsign that caught my eye on this thread.

My first ship was the Benhope/GJZD in July 1971 - so it looks as though they kept the callsign when she was sold as MV Egidia.

Has anybody, per chance, got any inboard photos of her - any of the radio room or wheelhouse would be really appreciated.

Regards,

Steve.
(Thumb)

Neillcarslaw
10th July 2007, 11:55
I sailed as 3rd Mate in this ship in 1945 Neill Ca<rslaw

R58484956
10th July 2007, 16:45
Greetings Neill and a warm welcome to SN. As you see its a small world here on site. Enjoy what you see and bon voyage.

vectiscol
12th July 2007, 21:30
I can remember Egidia laying at anchor in the Solent for quite some time during the Suez crisis in 1956. She was loaded with a deck cargo of Army vehicles and equipment.

brian reynolds
9th July 2008, 09:00
Hi all, the egidia was also my first ship, i joined her in govan dry dock in 1977 the year i believe she was bought back from the greeks. I was the catering boy, the chief cook and chief steward were both named Jimmy. the captain was Duncan Lamont, sailed to Swansea,Manchester, Suez,Aden,Jeddah, Bombay, Karachi, payed off Manchester, just before xmas, only A>B i ca remember was a huge guy named Roger Pkane from manchester

Fairfield
9th July 2008, 10:05
I took a couple of shots of her which are in the Gallery
http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/showphoto.php?photo=51802
;
http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/showphoto.php?photo=51801

k.atkinson
24th March 2013, 20:49
Hi all, the egidia was also my first ship, i joined her in govan dry dock in 1977 the year i believe she was bought back from the greeks. I was the catering boy, the chief cook and chief steward were both named Jimmy. the captain was Duncan Lamont, sailed to Swansea,Manchester, Suez,Aden,Jeddah, Bombay, Karachi, payed off Manchester, just before xmas, only A>B i ca remember was a huge guy named Roger Pkane from manchester

The later "Egidia" was built by Bartrams, Sunderland in 1962 as the "Avisfaith", 1971 as a Greek “Alexandos B” and renamed "Egidia" in 1977 when bought by Runciman, who owned Anchor Line. 1981 sold, renamed "Sea Victory", 1982 "Southdene", 1984 "Asther", 1985 broken up in San Esteban de Pravia, Spain. The standing joke about buying from the Greeks circulated into the Merchant Navy not just the ship & Anchor Line.
I Joined Egidia in Salford Docks, Manchester 25/8/77 returning 10/12/77 as 2/E on loan after being J/2/E with Reardon Smith. Master was Duncan Lamont & Chief George? Mitchell, Ch. Steward Jimmy. There being no internet I knew little other than the name as the office volunteered little so I was surprised to find a ship built 1962 with wooden hatch slabs & canvas covers compared to MacGregor steel hatches on my first ship, Romanby of Ropners built 1957, both tween-deckers. Although it had just come out of dry-dock the fire & smoke damage was still visible in the engine room and the hidden effects became apparent when we tried to leave. Being used to manoeuvring Doxford, B&W, & Sulzer engines this one, being a Gotaverken, had a large wheel instead of levers. The Chief answered the 1st telegraph movement, started the engine & ascended the adjacent stairs. As he vanished out of sight I answered STOP on the telegraph & rotated the wheel to stop. As expected the engine stopped but what I was not expecting was the lights to go out. Regardless of training & experience the 1st thought is “what have I done?” then I realised I could not be the author. The ship tied back up & the generator fuel supply was drained, cleaned & tested before we could be let loose again. On sailing we went onto standard watch-keeping so I did 04.00-08.00 followed by breakfast & a field day morning in the pit. Following lunch I crashed prior to 16.00-20.00 watch. Shortly after my door crashed open with the Chief demanding to know why I was not down below. I answered succinctly & he went away as advised. Normal practice for me was to gather in Jimmy’s cabin after the evening watch for a few tins or occasionally ½ bottle Bacardi before crashing. Normal practice for the other four consisted of whisky in what seemed to me like industrial quantities. Jimmy admitted to me being on a bottle a day, while as supplier, the others he said were on more. On occasions before daybreak I visited the Bridge and being sociable made enough noise to awaken the dead..... Following entry into the Red Sea I noted that my cabin did not vary from 95 degrees night or day having the open deck above. The 1st cargo discharge was Jeddah where I visited the Norse Viking of Ropners which I had sailed on 5 years earlier as J/E. Only about 8 years younger than Egidia but this changed reality was the start of UMS even if the office kept watches as a precaution. As my hosts were running dry I visited their Chief Steward whom I knew & reminded him about his skill with furniture polish & custom seals & supplies flowed again. Next stop was Aden to land 50 tons of lavatory pans – why should that parcel be memorable? In Bombay I was informed that local labour would arrive to clean the filthy fire & usage damaged engine room. While giving out maintenance jobs to the squad I looked up startled to see 27 Indians appearing, 5 of these appeared to be in the category “child labour” as the Victorians understood it. I turned to our squad “cancel the work & secure anything portable”. Our labour’s “Personal Protective Equipment” or PPE consisted of a pair of shorts which they deemed sufficient to clean the broken glass & sludge on the tank-tops with hand-shovel & scraper. A run shore-side took us to “The Gateway to India” (tourist education) followed by a few drinks in “The Lancers Bar” in the “Taj” hotel where the bar staff were dressed as Bengal Lancers albeit with trays not lances. This was followed by a taxi round the Promenade to a restaurant where we were served the 1st “sizzlers” I had experienced. We completed loading at Karachi & then back to Manchester. A Securicor van delivered the payroll and the Mate, Steward & I divided up the £50 notes & smaller into envelopes for the closing of articles. This was alien as cheques, notes on owners with bank transfers seemed the usual. Observing the chaotic loading & discharge of cargo it was not surprising containers were taking over.

Bobmac
18th May 2013, 06:31
Joined Egidia January 1953 as first trip cadet. Capt John L. Gibson, Mate Bill Sawyer 2nd Mate Bill(?) Jones a taffy, two RO's don't remember names. Chippy Wee Donald McLean. Bobmac