Soup!

Ant P
10th April 2010, 20:19
I often used to tell my kids about how much we used to eat as Cadets/Middies (which is correct?). We used to go through the card at breakfast as many times as we were allowed and as much toast or what ever at smokoes. One of the things I remember was the names of the soup! If there are any grocers out there can you tell me if there was a book with the names of all the soups in, or did you just make them up as you went along? It was always yesterday leftovers, but they had great names. Cream Du Barry for cauliflower soup.There were some really posh names for omlettes too.

John Callon
10th April 2010, 20:46
Buy yourself a copy of La Repetiore de la Cuisine by the famous French Chef Herman Senn. It gives you all the names of different soups i.e. Potages, Broths, Cream Soups, Consommes etc. and what they contain.
Regards,
John.

Santos
10th April 2010, 21:05
All I can remember is that it would appear to start as a clear consume type soup on the Monday and then having been through most colours and consistencies, depending on what was eaten during the week, normally ended up as a ' thick cream of something ' by the following Sunday (Jester)

Chris.

sparkie2182
10th April 2010, 21:15
Oxtail soup was the one to avoid.

:)

trotterdotpom
11th April 2010, 00:49
I loved oxtail soup! I hated Potage Cressy (sp?) - bovril with carrots.

John T.

stevie burgess
11th April 2010, 01:21
Mock turtle soup! I seem to recall it looked and tasted like a milder form of oxtail soup. Anyone else ever heard of it?

sparkie2182
11th April 2010, 01:31
I have Stevie............

A bit of a Gourmand speciality in Queensland when the vegemite is running low.

:)

Pat Kennedy
11th April 2010, 08:38
I remember Blue Funnel soup, which was generally pretty horrible and was served to the sailors mess in a 'kit' which was a big aluminium container.
The very worst was called Cockie Leekie, but there were other similar concoctions.
Few of the crowd ever ate the soup, most of it went over the side.
Soup was followed by 'entree' which was often a curried rehash of something from the previous day's main course.
The main course was a roast dinner, usually pork, two slices, two roast spuds, two boiled spuds, some cabbage and carrots, and a slurp of gravy. then dessert.
Plenty of food on Blueys, but rarely was it much good.

Burned Toast
11th April 2010, 10:49
I often used to tell my kids about how much we used to eat as Cadets/Middies (which is correct?). We used to go through the card at breakfast as many times as we were allowed and as much toast or what ever at smokoes. One of the things I remember was the names of the soup! If there are any grocers out there can you tell me if there was a book with the names of all the soups in, or did you just make them up as you went along? It was always yesterday leftovers, but they had great names. Cream Du Barry for cauliflower soup.There were some really posh names for omlettes too.

Creme du Barry, on many menu's in Hotels and restaurants besides the MN(Applause) lovely jubbley(==D)

Tai Pan
11th April 2010, 11:32
Brown Windsor. no idea whar was in it, sounds like someone trying for re-election.

trotterdotpom
11th April 2010, 11:43
Mock turtle soup! I seem to recall it looked and tasted like a milder form of oxtail soup. Anyone else ever heard of it?

Mock Turtle soup! I'm not sticking my neck out when I say that Turtle soup is no laughing matter - not many shipping companies would be prepared to shell out for the real thing, even if it wasn't ecologically unsound.

There are several recipes for mock turtle soup, some of which include oxtail or "lid de la merde" as Jamie Oliver would call it. It was only made out of vegemite in an attempt to pull the wool over the eyes of the "bloods" on the QE2.

John T.

PS I think "Brown Windsor" was a way of using left over gravy but it was great with bread.

Ken Green
11th April 2010, 15:25
Sorry Pat but I don't agree with you! I joined Blue Flue as a deck boy in 1946 and after all the war years rationing I found the food Excellent! I stayed with the company a long time too.
Cheers, Ken

Nick Balls
11th April 2010, 16:05
An old deep sea cook working in the offshore game in the 1970's.
The nice printed menu had long gone,
The Rank of chief steward had ceased to be .......
A small ship in a rough sea but still standards are standards ..........

Soup of the Day.
'Love by a stream'

What the heck is that? said the 2nd engineer , arriving late.
'Dun't know' says the cook, 'but its near water'

Burned Toast
11th April 2010, 18:52
I remember Blue Funnel soup, which was generally pretty horrible and was served to the sailors mess in a 'kit' which was a big aluminium container.
The very worst was called Cockie Leekie, but there were other similar concoctions.
Few of the crowd ever ate the soup, most of it went over the side.
Soup was followed by 'entree' which was often a curried rehash of something from the previous day's main course.
The main course was a roast dinner, usually pork, two slices, two roast spuds, two boiled spuds, some cabbage and carrots, and a slurp of gravy. then dessert.
Plenty of food on Blueys, but rarely was it much good.



I used to often wonder before they came to sea what they had at home to eat(LOL) I never had meat and two veg every other day at home!! mind I only lived in a council house(Smoke)(Applause) Ray

Tmac1720
11th April 2010, 18:56
Mock turtle soup! I seem to recall it looked and tasted like a milder form of oxtail soup. Anyone else ever heard of it?

For goodness sake don't mention this to Tonga otherwise he'll be making soup out of your dangly bits (EEK) He is very protective when it comes to Turtles mock or otherwise (LOL)

PADDY
11th April 2010, 20:56
How about Split-Pea soup?
My favourite!!

Paddy

john fraser
11th April 2010, 21:05
Brown Windsor. no idea whar was in it, sounds like someone trying for re-election.

The origin of this soup is that it was made with animals or game from Royal Windsor park not the safari park. A similar soup is Baxters Royal Game Soup

holland25
11th April 2010, 21:39
Petite Marmite comes to mind from my BF days. I have to agree with Ken Green the food wasnt all that bad, not generally anything fancy but good plain fare. Another soup memory is Potage Bonne Femme.

Macphail
11th April 2010, 22:19
I used to like the Consomme Royale on the BF Xmas menu.
Beef stock with strands of egg.

John.

eldersuk
11th April 2010, 22:36
One of ED's was Potage Parmentier - potato soup? We reckoned the recipe came from Stalag Luft III.

Derek

awateah2
11th April 2010, 23:54
As a boy in early post war Britain ,soup was a meal !!!!! It was not until I went to sea that I discovered that a main course followed it !!!!!!

Billieboy
12th April 2010, 05:37
One of ED's was Potage Parmentier - potato soup? We reckoned the recipe came from Stalag Luft III.

Derek

I ate some of this in France in 1953, it really was a quality soup and I had seconds!

john fraser
12th April 2010, 08:05
Used to put Cullen Skink on the menu and a few crew members used to ask where was the soup or why was there no soup.Then others used to ask "What is it".Could be described as Soup.Fish and Main Course all in one

grant1
12th April 2010, 15:57
Port Melbourne in the mid 60s.Brown Windsor,havnt a clue what was in itbbut I can still taste it

Tony D
12th April 2010, 16:19
Surprised nobody has mentioned Muligatawni,great stuff,the heinz stuff is but a pale imitation of what we had at sea, as is their pea soup, plus it dont have no sippits(sp?) dunno if it was my particular time at sea or the companies I sailed with but I was never on a bad feeder.
The only soups that come anywhere near as good as I remember are the Baxters range.

Pat Kennedy
12th April 2010, 20:06
The best soup I ever tasted in my whole life wasn't on a ship, it was in the canteen at Thyssen Nordseewerke in Emden, where I was working on a P+O new build.
The soup in question was Chile con carne soup, and it was delicious, and cost 1 Mark.
A close second was in the Chainbridge Hotel outside Pembroke when I was working on one of Rowbotham's. It was French onion soup, almost as delicious as the first.
Nothing I've tasted before or since comes close.
Pat(Thumb)

Billieboy
12th April 2010, 20:18
I'm with you on that Pat, HDW Hamburg canteen used to do a bowl of broth with dimplings and bread for one mark in the Seventies, it was about two litres and was a good day's feed!

Thats another Story
12th April 2010, 21:03
anyone comeing to liverpool come and try the wifes pee whack with ribs or ham shank? one bowl is never enough just like your mother made it.all welcome.(Thumb)

Barber Hector
19th April 2010, 12:59
Thought I had arrived in a different world on my first trip. Silver service, Chinese stewards and more food than I thought possible in the 1950's. With the odd exception I allways thought the food on BF and Glen ships were excellent. However ...brown Windsor soup followed by boiled mutton, not to mention corned silverside of beef, and those cheese sandwiches on the bridge all dry and curled at the edges were definately the exception.