Anchors/Hawse Pipes

jasmacpm
23rd April 2010, 10:48
Hi, I don't want to seem too ignorant and can see some of the answers to my query, anyway, but can someone expand on the reasons for what I would call the large snout, at the bottom of the hawse pipe, where some anchors now sit, when heaved home? Does it have a name? Advantages, disadvantages? Any particular types, size of ship? Just curious - and think they don't add to the looks of the vessel.

Cheers,

Jimmy.

Pat Kennedy
23rd April 2010, 10:53
Jimmy,
I believe the sole purpose is to keep the anchor away from the hull.
Pat

jasmacpm
23rd April 2010, 11:03
As simple as that, eh! Why didn't I come up with the idea? I wonder. Thanks, Pat.

Billieboy
23rd April 2010, 11:34
The protuberance outboard of the hull where the anchor sits on the latest large bulkers/VLCCs and other odd looking bows, is an extension of the hawse pipe which enables the anchor to be dropped and heaved without damage to the bulbous bow and flattened forefoot. In addition, it enables the anchor to free fall. Some ULCCs with anchors weighing 24-26 tonnes had a problem with free falling anchors; they didn't; so had to be walked out with the cable actually pushing the anchor off it's stowage. This was quite acceptable when there was steam on the windlass, however, on one occasion there was No steam available and the available compressed air did not supply enough power! large hammers and bars assisted, but then it was found that it was impossible to de-clutch, this was fortunate in the end as both anchors were walked out after they dropped, the anchors assisted in stopping the dead ship after some fourteen miles, saving the ship and the biggest ever oil spill.

As for the name? I call them anchor nostrils!

randcmackenzie
23rd April 2010, 22:26
Frog's eyes, I've heard them called.

Slamming into a sea used to sometimes cause the anchor to penetrate the shell plate, with subsequent flooding of the associated compartment., which doesn't happen with the frog's eye.

The hawse pipe length is also increased significantly, which may improve layout of windlass and compressor on a tight forecastle.

John Cassels
23rd April 2010, 23:43
Frog's eyes, I've heard them called.

Slamming into a sea used to sometimes cause the anchor to penetrate the shell plate, with subsequent flooding of the associated compartment., which doesn't happen with the frog's eye.

The hawse pipe length is also increased significantly, which may improve layout of windlass and compressor on a tight forecastle.

You've got me there Roddy, not quite sure what you mean .

surfaceblow
24th April 2010, 00:02
The only time I had a anchor penetrate the shell plate was due to the bottom of the hawse pipe worn down and the anchor was pulled to tight to compensate for the hawse pipe wear.

To correct the problem we shipped the anchor on a barge disconnected the link and clad welded the hawse pipe while a thicker shell plate was installed where the hull was punctured. The plate was flush on the outside with the extra thickness in the bosun stores.

The only problem was the Chief Mate did not record the new links serial number before he had the new link installed so he tried to read the number with the hook in the hawse pipe. It did not work so the anchor had to be lowered back on the barge so the ABS Inspector could change the ships paperwork.

Klaatu83
24th April 2010, 14:45
I was on one ship that had a hawsepipe similar to that described. It had been modified with a large bulbous bow, and the "snouts" were added at the same time. I always assumed the "snouts" were there to serve as fairleads, to help prevent the anchor from damaging the bulbous bow while dropping. If they had a specific name I never heard it, we simply referred to the entire assemblies as "hawsepipes".