Cruise ship / Liner

philrigger
27th May 2010, 10:43
Is there an official difference between a cruise ship and a liner?

I have always understood it as being;

A cruise ship is akin to a tour bus ride. - Passengers get on and stay with the ship until she returns to original port of departure. More like an all-in holiday.

A liner is akin to a national bus service. Passengers get on and off during the journey of the ship.

However with ships like the 'Queens' it seems to be a mixture of both.

Is this rubbish?

Phil.

sparkie2182
27th May 2010, 11:00
Liner.............Regular fixed schedule.

Cruise ship..... Irregular ports of call often depending on season.

philrigger
27th May 2010, 11:42
Thank you Sparkie.

Phil

philrigger
27th May 2010, 13:49
So, are there any purely Liners in service now? Or do they change role according to demand?

Alistair Macnab
27th May 2010, 14:33
I believe this topic has been discussed quite often but since it has come up again, I'll give you my take on the topic.
The word 'liner' denotes a ship assigned to a regular, advertised sailing on a given route that is open as a common carrier to accept cargo and passengers for any of the ports being advertised. Note that a liner may be a cargo-only ship and the term does not only exist for passenger ships.
In the days before airlines were the only way to go, it was the regularly advertised schedules of the passenger ship companies that were the only way of getting to where you were going. In that sense, these ships were liners.
Cruise ships, on the other hand, are out and back with the same passengers on board and whilst they are well advertised, they are not liners in the strict definition of the word but merely voyages of opportunity much like the original definition of a 'tramp' ship.
Certainly, the term 'luxury liner' is the biggest misnomer of all but is the regularly employed description of a ship carrying passengers used by the Press.
By the way, a 'tramp' ship is somewhat of a pejorative word used for a cargo-only ship when the better description would be 'freighter or 'cargo ship'. A cargo ship will be a liner when it is assigned to a regular, advertised sailing by its operator and a tramp ship will be open for hire or charter to a merchant who will take the entire ship (or sometimes part of it) for his own cargo, quite often a homogeneous bulk commodity but could just as easily be a full load of containers or general cargo.
When the "Queens" operate on the UK/USA line of service, they are liners, but when they are cruising, then they are just 'cruisers', not cruise liners nor luxury liners. Its not the luxury that's in question but the erroneous use of the word 'liner'.
Got it?

Shipace5
27th May 2010, 18:08
Between of a liner and a cruise ship:

Liner is this ship wat sail between two or more ports. It sail at firm time and between firm ports.
For example: Silja europa sail between Stockholm-Marienhamn-Turu(Finland-Sweden)

Cruise ship: Cruise ship not sail always on firm line every day. Cruise ships are more luxury then Liner(I think)

Binnacle
27th May 2010, 19:10
I believe this topic has been discussed quite often but since it has come up again, I'll give you my take on the topic.
The word 'liner' denotes a ship assigned to a regular, advertised sailing on a given route that is open as a common carrier to accept cargo and passengers for any of the ports being advertised. Note that a liner may be a cargo-only ship and the term does not only exist for passenger ships.
In the days before airlines were the only way to go, it was the regularly advertised schedules of the passenger ship companies that were the only way of getting to where you were going. In that sense, these ships were liners.
Cruise ships, on the other hand, are out and back with the same passengers on board and whilst they are well advertised, they are not liners in the strict definition of the word but merely voyages of opportunity much like the original definition of a 'tramp' ship.
Certainly, the term 'luxury liner' is the biggest misnomer of all but is the regularly employed description of a ship carrying passengers used by the Press.
By the way, a 'tramp' ship is somewhat of a pejorative word used for a cargo-only ship when the better description would be 'freighter or 'cargo ship'. A cargo ship will be a liner when it is assigned to a regular, advertised sailing by its operator and a tramp ship will be open for hire or charter to a merchant who will take the entire ship (or sometimes part of it) for his own cargo, quite often a homogeneous bulk commodity but could just as easily be a full load of containers or general cargo.
When the "Queens" operate on the UK/USA line of service, they are liners, but when they are cruising, then they are just 'cruisers', not cruise liners nor luxury liners. Its not the luxury that's in question but the erroneous use of the word 'liner'.
Got it?

Thanks Alistair, that is the facts regarding "Liners". However, I would never refer to any merchant vessel as a "cruiser".
I note that even the "Oxford Companion to Ships and the Sea" has a misleading definition of Liners.

Chris Isaac
27th May 2010, 20:27
Cruise ships are dirty great ugly lumps that I would not be seen dead on.
Liners are the reason why I am a member of this site and get all emotional from time to time, they dont really exist any more!

john strange
28th May 2010, 07:48
Passenger liners are normaly ships of class and well designed. Shapely and often awe inspiring. Cruise ships are designed mainly as floating appartment blocks, or for want of a better term a floating hotel, even if a little odd looking.