"Corabank" Class...

Alistair Macnab
29th May 2010, 18:39
I am looking for a good photograph of any one of the Corabank Class which shows the glassed-in passenger lounge at the after end of the passenger space on the starboard side. Even a description of this space would do. I understand the windows were second-hand and came from another ship being broken up! Any truth to that story? How many passengers was the accommodation built for in how many cabins? I read these spaces were modular and inserted into the space as set-up cabins. Where was this done? Lastly, how many of the Class were so fitted out?

Duncan112
29th May 2010, 21:03
Corabank was disposed of before the conversion, I think Meadowbank also was and the story was that the accommodation came from the cancelled Superflex ferries being constructed at Sunderland. This leaves the Clyde, Ivy and Forth Banks converted.

exsailor
30th May 2010, 12:02
Alistair,

Have a look at following, think it shows what you are after - vessel is Forthbank. (Expanding image helps).
http://www.fotoflite.com/components/com_virtuemart/shop_image/product/230110.jpg

Dennis.

China hand
30th May 2010, 19:42
Said it before, got me no friends then; say it again: CORABANK class - 22 million good razorblades in every one of them. The ravings of a demented general *** container *** tanker *** bulkie *** heavy lifter *** hatch cover experimenting utter nutter.(Cloud)

Alistair Macnab
30th May 2010, 20:21
Thanks, Ex Sailor, for the photograph. It shows the lounge windows perfectly. Pity about the overprint of the copyright holder!
As for my good friend, China Hand, you have certainly made your razorblades point before and as time passes. the economic value of the "Corabank"s multi-purpose design is certainly open to question. This has always been a question of what should a ship be designed to do? Surely, its to carry the cargo mix that's on offer from merchants in both directions. Captain Gale's job was to design a ship that would fit the trade and at the same time, not rock the conservative attitude prevailing at Board level. At that time, the supers still had some say in what a ship should look like and what it should do. As a shoreside wallah, I found the Corabank Class most effective!
I also remember your other comment, When a ship is designed to do many things it ends up doing none of them very well! Too true, but needs must.
Hamish tells me that his new book: "The Fundamentals of Breakbulk Shipping" has been accepted by Pearsons Publishers and will be out in the Fall.

Charlie Stitt
30th May 2010, 21:47
Alistair, there is a good photo of the Clydebank in ''Merchant Navy Nostalgia'', Bank Line. She carried up to nine passengers.

Gulpers
31st May 2010, 12:28
Alistair,

There is a photograph of Clydebank showing the glazed passenger lounge here (http://www.photoship.co.uk/JAlbum%20Ships/Old%20Ships%20Ci/slides/Clydebank-05.html) .......... and a glimpse of the same feature on Forthbank here (http://www.photoship.co.uk/JAlbum%20Ships/Old%20Ships%20F/slides/Forthbank+Lady%20Elizabeth-01.html). (Thumb)

Looks like the Clydebank photograph is the same one Charlie has found, although from a different site! (==D)

jimthehat
31st May 2010, 12:59
What passenger lounge ,only passengers on my Clydebank were the engineers.

jim

Charlie Stitt
31st May 2010, 13:45
Yes Jim, but then, those two blast job engines you had on your Clydebank, were a piece of cake compared to what was on the last Clydebank. (Jester)

Alistair Macnab
31st May 2010, 17:03
Charlie, Jim, Gulpers......

Many thanks for your responses and the photographs attached by Gulpers are especially what I was looking for! What a treasure trove of the Merchant Navy Golden Years is to be found through SN! Perhaps you've noticed the enfolding of the updated Bank Line story in SN's Directory. I am grateful to Fred Henderson for helping me to publish my original stuff with photographs (mostly from SN contributors) and giving it a more universal appeal.

Gulpers
31st May 2010, 17:11
No problem Alistair - something generally turns up on SN if you wait around a bit. (==D)

China hand
31st May 2010, 19:37
Alistair: Hamish will love this: China in 'tween deck driving a forklift minitruck; wheels going one way, Ermin hatch shuffle boards going Yeah Man. Wet nickers!(Applause). One of the many delights of the Corabortion class.
What amazes me, they went on for so long. There were rust holes in the bulkheads in 1974 already! If this hold aint draining fast enough, kick it, job done. Cranes can't plum, put on a bull wire. Of course the butterworths don't work, we haven't got the pressure or enough hot. Tandem overload? NEVER. Tandem override? NEVER. Crawl in over the shaft to get in that tank? Not even to be thought about. The little trucky thing to get to the valve by No.1 deep tank? Genius. A jumbo derrick that my Dad would have been proud to have called Old Fashioned. More than 1.5m trim and spot a container? Yah, Gotcha!! Half a degree list and drain a tank unless you put the men in? Humm.
Gadani beach, best place for them.

I liked the Fish boats , I'm not entirely miserable.(A)

Hugh Ferguson
31st May 2010, 20:55
I thought this image-scanned from a Bank Line advert in a 1930's edition of the Blue Peter magazine-might be of interest to people who served in that famous shipping company.

Alistair Macnab
31st May 2010, 21:08
Thanks to Hugh Ferguson we can see that the U.S. Gulf to Australia and New Zealand services and the "Copra" or "Sopac" Service are not even mentioned!
These were the last survivors and their origins are described in SN's Directory under 'Bank Line'. They started out in the 1930s as Texas Company case oil and Lever Brothers copra contracts and developed from there.

david harrod
2nd June 2010, 11:16
Alistair: Hamish will love this: China in 'tween deck driving a forklift minitruck; wheels going one way, Ermin hatch shuffle boards going Yeah Man. Wet nickers!(Applause). One of the many delights of the Corabortion class.
What amazes me, they went on for so long. There were rust holes in the bulkheads in 1974 already! If this hold aint draining fast enough, kick it, job done. Cranes can't plum, put on a bull wire. Of course the butterworths don't work, we haven't got the pressure or enough hot. Tandem overload? NEVER. Tandem override? NEVER. Crawl in over the shaft to get in that tank? Not even to be thought about. The little trucky thing to get to the valve by No.1 deep tank? Genius. A jumbo derrick that my Dad would have been proud to have called Old Fashioned. More than 1.5m trim and spot a container? Yah, Gotcha!! Half a degree list and drain a tank unless you put the men in? Humm.
Gadani beach, best place for them.

I liked the Fish boats , I'm not entirely miserable.(A)
I stood by the building of the fish boats; best that bank line ever built in my view...

Winebuff
2nd June 2010, 18:47
I stood by the building of the fish boats; best that bank line ever built in my view...
The Cora class were a bit like Marmite, there were loved and loathed in equal measure.
I was a loather, but could not really say why. They were no better or worse to work on from an ER point other than keeping the oil tanks warm on the way back and discharging once we were home - usually in mid winter in Hamburg or Rotterdam into what appeared open tanks??
I'm with you Fish boats any day. (can we call them boats or are we now stuck with ships?)

Peter Smith
74-84

Charlie Stitt
2nd June 2010, 19:18
When I first saw photos of the Corabank, I thought, now why did'nt Weirs have those in the 60's when I was there, but having heard the recent coments I think to myself. Ah the good old Laganbank and Foylebank of the 50's, the Inverbank and Forresbank of the early 60's were not so bad after all. Even the old Samboats were OK. (Thumb)

China hand
2nd June 2010, 19:35
I also stood by The Fish Class (Fish boats) in SundyLand. I thought they were not three bad at all. Didn't that little winch on the mast top raise a few giggles?

Waighty
7th June 2010, 12:02
Thanks, Ex Sailor, for the photograph. It shows the lounge windows perfectly. Pity about the overprint of the copyright holder!
As for my good friend, China Hand, you have certainly made your razorblades point before and as time passes. the economic value of the "Corabank"s multi-purpose design is certainly open to question. This has always been a question of what should a ship be designed to do? Surely, its to carry the cargo mix that's on offer from merchants in both directions. Captain Gale's job was to design a ship that would fit the trade and at the same time, not rock the conservative attitude prevailing at Board level. At that time, the supers still had some say in what a ship should look like and what it should do. As a shoreside wallah, I found the Corabank Class most effective!
I also remember your other comment, When a ship is designed to do many things it ends up doing none of them very well! Too true, but needs must.
Hamish tells me that his new book: "The Fundamentals of Breakbulk Shipping" has been accepted by Pearsons Publishers and will be out in the Fall.

Alistair, you won't recall the conversation but when I was 3rd Mate on the Weirbank circa 1972 at New Orleans, you asked me to describe what the three-quarter aft Ben Boats were like as head office had indicated a possible intention to buy. Since I was an ex Ben Line cadet who had sailed on them I seem to recall giving you much info - particularly wrt deep tanks and split hatches. The class was Benledi onwards and if BL had purchased them the SOPAC service would have been very quick - 21 knots, stainless steel deep tanks, electric TD hatches, automatic derrick guys and topping lifts etc.

Corabank class were "interesting" to work on - I did three of them as Mate.

Alistair Macnab
7th June 2010, 17:25
Waighty....

Indeed I do remember the conversation! Looking back it was obvious that Ben Line wanted to off-load their best ships and replace them with their contribution to the ACT Group. Remember, membership in ACT or OCL demanded that you not compete with cargo liner services! The "Benledi"-type ships would have been great and believe it or not, that's what Bank Line were trying to achieve with the "Corabank" Class! Well.... its all water under the keel, these days and both Ben and Weirs got suckered out of the 'secondary' services - heavy lifts, logs, copra etc. by the wild rush to put everything in the box. Look how 'specialist' breakbulk is doing today! Good to see you're on SN. Kind regards.

david harrod
8th June 2010, 10:15
I also stood by The Fish Class (Fish boats) in SundyLand. I thought they were not three bad at all. Didn't that little winch on the mast top raise a few giggles?

I'm still laughing! Seriously tho' they were a dream to work...took a little bit of effort to get the crew's heads around reeving the wires on the winch drums and the little well deck aft was a strange structure, but I loved them...