Pacing the plates and ant control .

Derek Roger
30th May 2010, 19:40
My late father commented on my habit , even when on leave ' of pacing up and down in what ever space I happened to be located.
His observation was that " It is a habit of jailbirds and marine engineers ; too much time spent on the engine room plates "

This in mind I spend about 2 hrs in the summer just walking around the patio and have utilised this wasted time in stamping on ants . The average "kill' rate is about 500 / day .

I have few if any ants on my pation now since the word has got around .

Am I all alone in this pest control method or are there other members out there like minded .

Derek

Billieboy
30th May 2010, 21:56
I've a hedgehog and five families of blackbirds to keep the ants down! I spent enough time on the plates and never had a pacing problem!

Macphail
30th May 2010, 22:16
Pacing the bottom plates by Chiefy, next to the meouvering stand, was normal, during Standby, before the the engine room control room.

John

Frank Holleran
30th May 2010, 22:31
Pacing the boiler room plates on watch...and then on deck pacing back and forth, seemed to be a normal trait for a lot of down below crowd.

clevewyn
30th May 2010, 22:42
I remember being shoved down the Boiler room on Ark Royal for a month, "time you had a break" the engineer said.

Most boring month I ever had.

Macphail
30th May 2010, 23:01
(Thumb)I sailed as Chief Engineer from 1978 to 2001.
Always the engine room control room..
The Blue Flue and Bank Line, 1960 to 1974, with the bottom plates maneouvering stand.
During Standby, the Blue Flue chief would sometimes attend, sparkling white boilersuit and gloves, Bank line, never saw him.

Changed days, maybe.

John.

Derek Roger
31st May 2010, 00:56
I've a hedgehog and five families of blackbirds to keep the ants down! I spent enough time on the plates and never had a pacing problem!

Must have been sitting on your Butt Billieboy .

Malky Glaister
31st May 2010, 01:03
Hi, I paced the plates. More so when control rooms became the thing. I always felt that I sensed what was happening. With the large engines you could keep yorself fit(Tish).
As Chief I would walk around the deck daily for excercise. I still walk miles every day but seldom on chequer plate,
regards
Malky Glaister

tsell
31st May 2010, 01:17
My late father commented on my habit , even when on leave ' of pacing up and down in what ever space I happened to be located.
His observation was that " It is a habit of jailbirds and marine engineers ; too much time spent on the engine room plates "

This in mind I spend about 2 hrs in the summer just walking around the patio and have utilised this wasted time in stamping on ants . The average "kill' rate is about 500 / day .

I have few if any ants on my pation now since the word has got around .

Am I all alone in this pest control method or are there other members out there like minded .

Derek

HI Derek

I share your feelings regarding the ant population. However my wife is just the opposite. (She is in most things!)

Here in Queensland we have been plagued with hordes of ant of all shapes and sizes throughout summer. Now herein lies a tale.

I have tried every form of eradication - when the missus was not around - to no avail. Even the trusty ant sand, which they carry away to their nests, did not work this year for some strange reason.

Threatening severe injury to my person if I harmed the bloody little pests, my wife said, "Leave them alone, they will soon be gone."

Now for the weird part. One morning about three weeks ago, walking into the family room just on daybreak, I noticed a dark stain on the tiles. It was huge, well over one and a half square metres. As I edged closer, I saw that there were thousands of ants all gathered in that one spot, seemingly having a pow-wow. Sounds ridiculous, eh?

I rushed into the laundry and grabbed a spray can and was about to let fly when a hand grabbed my neck and hauled me back! "DON"T YOU DARE!" said a stern voice. "They will soon be gone."

With that, as if they were aware of their peril, the horde moved as one under the lounge suite, showing no trace of their presence. I was ordered out of the room.

We lingered over breakfast and talked about it and I was informed that the same thing happened at the same time last year. Buggered if I remembered it!

An hour or so later we went back into the family room, gingerly lifted the furniture and there the little blighters were - GONE!! There are no more ants either inside or out on the patio and it's a case of 'wife happy - life happy!'

Maybe there's an entomologist out there who can explain the phenomenon.

PS you wouldn't be welcome in our house, Derek!

Taff

spongebob
31st May 2010, 02:09
Taff, We have had a similar experiences although my partner is sometimes variable about selection and protection of nature's creatures.
You know, stamp on an ant but spend the morning rescuing and drying a bee that has fallen into the swimming pool, Chiding me for eating "Skippy" when I try Kangaroo meat but savouring those little tender lamb chops herself.
Another one is her loving the little foreign geckos that invade the house and drop their leftovers everywhere but capable of picking up cane toads off the lawn and lobbing them to kingdom come (rubber gloved of course)
Yes I have used the ant sand with part success but they seem to become immune.
As for pacing the plates, I never sailed in a ship modern enough to have a control room but my forte was to roam from the engine front down the port side right to the stern gland and back up starboard side. I forget the number of paces but a few rounds meant a lot of walking. On a night watch in calm seas it certainly was better than sitting drinking tea.
Today I do it in the garden, pacing the plates that is.

Bob

Billieboy
31st May 2010, 06:38
Must have been sitting on your Butt Billieboy .

Not at all Derek, just never had the time to pace around, so never learned it. Suez Canal South stand by, was the best, eating shrimps on the plates, cooked in the tea boiler.

tsell
31st May 2010, 09:40
Hi Bob

I watch with great amusement the morning ritual of debugging the pool with a strainer attached to a broomstick. No, it's not a mode of transport!
But your bit about Skippy is a bit close to home. I have been banned from buying it for years. However the other day I thought I would buy a quarter of goat, which has become very popular of late on the Gold Coast.
Well that did it, I forgot goats can be more cute and cuddly than 'roos!!
So it is languishing in the deep freeze until I can find someone to take it off my hands. It cost me $46 but it's free to a good home! Mind you it's been very quiet around the house lately, come to think of it!

Taff

chadburn
31st May 2010, 10:53
Pacing around the Engineroom it may be, but mine/your eye's were alway's "on Watch" for anything different.

spongebob
31st May 2010, 22:22
Yes Chadburn, all six senses were on the alert in those days, remember the loving hand that caressed and felt the warmth of each tail shaft plummer block as you wandered down the tunnel.
Today hearing is the dullest sense, sight is no longer 20/20, but taste and smell still allows us to enjoy a good meal. Touch? well that should always remain special.
We can thank goodness that we weren't locomotive engine drivers, not much space to pace on those plates .

Bob

spongebob
31st May 2010, 22:34
Don't despair over that goat too soon Taff.
I think that I may have told this story before but a year or two ago we had a family member's birthday at "Kathmandu", an ethnic restaurant in Raby Bay. The format was that each diner selected a dish from the menu and then all servings went on the table for sharing.
I chose the goat, words of disappointment, even disgust, from the ladies and younger ones. "Bob how could you?" was one, while a deep male voice said "You are on your own mate"
The dishes arrived, handed around for sampling then served onto the plates and guess which was gone first?
They all enjoyed its tangy taste and fat free tenderness so much we ordered another serve!
Tell her that only devout vegetarianism or Veganism should prevent her trying it,

Bob

uisdean mor
5th June 2010, 16:05
Still do it. Bus stops, meetings, conferences, funerals, weddings - anywhere there is a bit of hanging around. Drives the wife mental and she just does not get it.
Rgds
Uisdean

J Boyde
6th June 2010, 08:33
I confess to walking the plates, regardless of the weather. A number of runs down the tunnel, and one on deck to the steering gear. Have done quite a few when holding on, and holding on harder as I came higher up the accomodation. The best shoes I wore in rough weather was plastic, the grip was better then leather shoes. On to power stations, again walking the plates, into the contril room, still walking the plates. Now retired and still go out for an hour walk every day. Now it is the walk that keeps me mobile, and meeting interesting people, (pluss a nice stick, dont like being bitten)
Jim B

allanc
20th June 2010, 12:14
My sailing mate, former British Merchant Marine during WW2 has described to me exactly the same pacing phenomenon on the bridge. There can't be too many walking options on board ship. We don't do it on my little yacht,nowhere to go!

degsy
24th June 2010, 02:43
I sailed with a Second on the Onitsha who paced up and down the maneuvering platform, at quite a pace, muttering to himself. Then he would suddenly dart off and look at some job or other. Weird, it fascinated the ER crowd, worried me a bit till I got used to him.