Barge Carriers

PMN1
23rd June 2010, 14:23
From ’The Watery Maze’ by Bernard Fergusson

The LSD was the brain-foster-child of Hussey’s, who had introduced it to an initially sceptical world at a meeting in the Admiralty in September (1941). He handed round a photograph of a ‘Popper’ barge transporter, such as was used on the Danube. These flooded like a floating dock, and while so flooded shipped a barge on either side of their superstructure; they then pumped the water out, so that the barges were lifted clear of the water resting on sponsons on either side of the ship. Such a vessel had several advantages. She would be designed to carry two loaded LCTs in a hold, or dock, instead of on external sponsons, as in the Popper barge.


Does anyone have any pictures of these Popper barge ships?

Gulpers
23rd June 2010, 15:11
PMN1,

On behalf of the Moderating Team, a warm welcome aboard from the Isle of Anglesey!
I hope you thoroughly enjoy your time on SN and get many happy hours entertainment from your membership. (Thumb)


See this link (http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=oWX-x0b4pw4C&pg=PA115&lpg=PA115&dq=Popper+barge+ship&source=bl&ots=evt_1YBGsw&sig=g0syQyEM65NGTUkBU0Xb42otN5E&hl=en&ei=8hIiTLb9NY7KjAf5u9GsAQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=4&ved=0CCUQ6AEwAw#v=onepage&q=Popper%20barge%20ship&f=false) - if you look from pages 127 onwards, there are drawings and photographs of LSDs. Still looking for Popper Barge Ships! (==D)

PMN1
23rd June 2010, 19:07
PMN1,



See this link (http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=oWX-x0b4pw4C&pg=PA115&lpg=PA115&dq=Popper+barge+ship&source=bl&ots=evt_1YBGsw&sig=g0syQyEM65NGTUkBU0Xb42otN5E&hl=en&ei=8hIiTLb9NY7KjAf5u9GsAQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=4&ved=0CCUQ6AEwAw#v=onepage&q=Popper%20barge%20ship&f=false) - if you look from pages 127 onwards, there are drawings and photographs of LSDs. Still looking for Popper Barge Ships! (==D)

Thanks for that, i've had that book and a lot of Friedman's other books from the library, interesting reads.

What caught my attention with this was the line

'The transporter had been conceived in the early 1920's as part of a broader transmodal scheme, in which Danube barges would be loaded directly onto oceangoing freighters. A model had been built and calculations carried out by C. N. Triestino, Isherwood & Company London, Blohm and Voss, and the Vienna Experimental Institute for Shipbuilding. LLoyds Registry had approved the concept.'

What i'm wondering is what kind of market did Popper think there would be for shipping barges on oceangoing freighters?

Billieboy
23rd June 2010, 19:47
Thanks for that, i've had that book and a lot of Friedman's other books from the library, interesting reads.

What caught my attention with this was the line

'The transporter had been conceived in the early 1920's as part of a broader transmodal scheme, in which Danube barges would be loaded directly onto oceangoing freighters. A model had been built and calculations carried out by C. N. Triestino, Isherwood & Company London, Blohm and Voss, and the Vienna Experimental Institute for Shipbuilding. LLoyds Registry had approved the concept.'

What i'm wondering is what kind of market did Popper think there would be for shipping barges on oceangoing freighters?

LASH as in Lykes line?

PMN1
23rd June 2010, 19:58
LASH as in Lykes line?


But they came later and and cant see the average sized MV of the 20's being able to carry many barges.

One of the objections to the LSD was that it would only be able to carry two 190ft landing craft and was not a very efficient use of material - this turned out not to be too big of a hurdle for the military as but it would commercially.

Hugh Ferguson
23rd June 2010, 21:41
This thread brings to my mind the loss of the "LASH" ship, Munchen. Does anyone remember that loss and what it was due to?

polsteam
29th June 2010, 00:33
This thread brings to my mind the loss of the "LASH" ship, Munchen. Does anyone remember that loss and what it was due to?

suspected freak wave ?...

Cisco
29th June 2010, 01:07
I'm not a great fan of 'freak' or 'rogue' wave theories.
That said, I seem to recall that at the time it was put down to putting her nose into a larger than average ( in that wave train) sea that smashed the wheelhouse windows, disabled all bridge electrics and electronics resulting in her broaching and being overwhelmed. Its always made sense to me.

Hugh Ferguson
29th June 2010, 11:18
Quote:- "I'm not a great fan of 'freak' or 'rogue' waves theories".
I couldn't agree more! This thumbnail shows a good example of what such an, alleged, freak wave can do to a ship. I happened to be at Folkestone on the day the Bencruachan took her pilot and I could hardly believe my eyes to see a ship so damaged.
She had evidently buried her nose in a huge "coamer" (not a word you see much used these days; it's a wave that comes aboard and buries her up to the coamings). With her fo'c'stle under hundreds of tons of water the natural buoyancy of the ship places an enormous stress, the wrong way, on the ship's structure, resulting in the "drooped snoot" appearance you see in the picture.
The Munchen disaster took place some few years before the Bencruachan incident. I have, on occasion, piloted both of these ships, which explains my interest.