Hyundai Shipyard, Pusan

Jan Hendrik
7th November 2005, 06:13
One of the world's largest newbuilding yards. They push through some 60 monsters per annum and all goes with extremely high speed and efficiency.

You find some pictures taken from the well known "hill in the centre" of the yard and some whereby you can see pre-build sections.
There is a picture of a stand from where ceremonies are held. They have two such stands in case two ceremonies have to take place the same day.
I do not know which Maersk-Sealand ship is under construction here.
I took these photos in May 2003.

Jan Hendrik
7th November 2005, 06:16
Hereby the other photos as mentioned above.
Photography is normally not allowed at this yard.

billyboy
7th November 2005, 07:37
saw a documentery on TV recently about this yard. Awesome the way they build em so quickly.

Jan Hendrik
7th November 2005, 08:05
I also have a series of photos from the Daewoo shipyard from a year earlier, they are about same size, some 60 vessels a year and as soon as I get a moment, then will post those.
They keep these yards in immaculate condition.


It takes many months to make a business appointment with these people.

japottinger
7th November 2005, 10:20
Did you stay in the "Foreigners Hotel" in the yard?
I was there for a couple of months in mid 1970's when the Kuwait Shpg. Co ships were being built. Only time I have seen a B&W diesel engine assembled on the dock side and lowered complete in the ship

Ron Stringer
7th November 2005, 11:42
Paid a visit to the Pusan yard in the early 1990s to deal with problems about deliveries that had been made to the yard. Meeting timed for 0800 meant leaving the hotel at 0500 to catch the ferry (passports had to be carried and shown in order to purchase ferry ticket) to the Daewoo shipyard. Attended several meetings during the morning with various departments and then we were sent for lunch to workers' canteen in the basement of one of the large buildings.

You collected a tin tray with shapes pressed into it, and a tin rice bowl, before standing in line to progress to the service hatch. There a succession of grim-faced women ladled or spooned quantities of food into the depressions in your tray. The food was not to this Westerner's taste but it was all that was on offer that day, so it had to be eaten. Having said that, I have eaten far worse elsewhere in the world.

The sting came at the end of the meal when you took your tray and bowl to an outside cold water tap to wash them and return them to the stack! You realised that you were dependent upon the health status and hygiene standards of the previous user to ensure that your dishes had been clean.

One thing was certain, you were left in no doubt about whether Daewoo were happy or not with the service they had been receiving from your employers.

Ron Stringer

Jan Hendrik
7th November 2005, 13:28
Paradise Hotel Pusan. On the beach. Top location. Not cheap though.

John Rogers
7th November 2005, 13:48
Korea has come a long way in some very short years. When I lived in Korea their cars were crap,to have anything made you had to tell them three times before they got it right,walking down the street one had to be careful where you walked in case you stepped on the previous nights toilet dump,the sewer ran down the gutters of the streets. Now they have very good cars,the electronics are good,and they are one of the top ship builders in the world. Also when I was there they would not let a Japanese car into the country,I was told by several Koreans that they despise the Japs because of the cruelty they handed out during the occupation over the years. Now they have modern cities with sewers under-ground,a rail system and super-modern subways,they are very hard workers and all they needed was a little quality control built into their work standards,and they all strive for higher education.
John.

Thamesphil
7th November 2005, 13:57
Hyundai Heavy Industry's (HHI's) shipyard is actually located at Ulsan. Output in 2004 was 65 ships of 6929 dwt or 2245 cgt. However, HHI also control the Hyundai Samho (Formerly Halla) Shipyard and Hyundai Mipo Dockyard (HMD) which, since about 1999, has concentrated on shipbuilding rather than shiprepair.

With Samho and HMD included, the HHI group's total output for 2004 was 123 ships.

By contrast, although at No. 3 in the World capacity stakes, Daewoo (DSME) produced only 35 ships of 4,305 dwt (1,537 cgt).

Samsung is No. 2 with 50 ships of 5,360 dwt (1,894 cgt).

Cheers,
Phil

Jan Hendrik
7th November 2005, 14:07
Hyundai is in Ulsan indeed and Daewoo in Pusan.
The output of Daewoo last year was very disappointing, they ran into some financial problems too as far as I recall, but previous years had their 50 to 60 or about vessels. By memory they had an equal number of vessels with Hyundai in 2003.

neil maclachlan
7th November 2005, 16:23
Hi Guys,
I watched the documentory about about the Hyundai Shipyard on television and havind been plant manager with "The Greenock Dockyard Co" was utterly amazed at the size of the sections fabricated and erected. Our yard was considered one of the most modern on the Clyde and we were very proud of this.unfortuneately we became part of the Scott Lithgow group and they went belly up (like most shipyards?). We used similar metods to Hyundia but a tenth of the size.Clyde shipyards did'nt think big enough!
Neil Mac

trotterdotpom
7th November 2005, 23:57
Korea has come a long way in some very short years. When I lived in Korea their cars were crap,to have anything made you had to tell them three times before they got it right,walking down the street one had to be careful where you walked in case you stepped on the previous nights toilet dump,the sewer ran down the gutters of the streets. Now they have very good cars,the electronics are good,and they are one of the top ship builders in the world.... John.

A few years ago I bought a Daewoo Matiz, partly because I wanted something cheap to run and partly because my daughter liked the look and thought she would inherit it. My son, a "Fast and the Furious" fan will not travel in it without a brown paper bag over his head.

The blurb in the advertising material said the car was "cute, clever and chic". When I took it home, my wife said: "Why did you buy such an ugly car?" I retorted: "It's not ugly, it's cute, clever and chic, Look...," showing her the write up.

After half a second's reflection, she came back with: "Well, you'd better get the windows tinted, you fat b******!"

Since then it's never missed a beat, apart from an altercation with a kangaroo, another with a Scotsman and another with a crooked mechanic, and it costs me half as much to get to work as it does everyone in their macho 4 Wheel Drives.

On the shipping front, "Iron Pacific", was built by HIH for BHP, Australia, in the mid-1980's. A 200,000 tonne bulk carrier, she was the biggest ship in Australia and operated in the coal trade between Australia and Korea, backloading at Northwest Australia with iron ore for the east coast. When I sailed on her, there were a lot of mechanical problems and I swore I'd never buy a Korean car. These problems were nothing compared to those following her inundation by volcanic ash at Subic Bay during the eruption of Mt Pinatubo (1990?)

Not sure if she's still running or not.

John T.