Chief & Ships Cook/ Ships Cook

ALAN TYLER
9th July 2010, 12:26
I always thought the difference between these two ranks was that the Chief & Ships cooked for the crew and Officers/Passengers where as the Ships Cook only cooked for the crew as in passenger ships. Now looking through my discharge book I find that on one ship (Humboldt) I was Ships Cook although I cooked for Officers and crew. Can anyone help this confused old "Babbling Brook"

ALAN TYLER
9th July 2010, 12:27
Adding to the above it was Foreign going and not Home Trade.

Gulpers
9th July 2010, 13:29
Alan,

Extract from the Maritime Skills site here (http://www.maritimeskills.org/careers/merchant_navy/mn_role.htm#cook) indicates that the names are synonymous.

"Cook (Ship's Cook, Chief Cook)

Food planning, preparation and stock taking/provisions ordering. Beyond the basic training all seafarers have to undertake, the only catering requirement is that the cook must hold a Ship's Cook certificate."

Ron Stringer
9th July 2010, 13:38
Logic would suggest that a Ship's Cook is someone that has attained the appropriate qualification and Chief Cook has that qualification but is employed as the person in charge of one or more other cooks (2nd Cook/Baker for example).

But since when was the MN ever logical? (Jester)

Pat Kennedy
9th July 2010, 19:26
A lot of chief cooks I sailed with liked to be known as 'the Chef'.
The one on the Nestor insisted that he was the 'Chef de Cuisine'
Whatever he liked to be called, we knew him as 'Oxtail Ollie' because of his fondness for serving us oxtail stew and his resemblance to Oliver Hardy.

Tony D
9th July 2010, 19:32
Cargo Ships/Tankers I was on always had a Chief Cook and a second Cook and Baker,Cooks were always called Doc.
Used to be said a Ship could sail without a Captains Ticket aboard but not without someone with a Cooks Ticket,dunno how true that was.

Burned Toast
9th July 2010, 22:12
Ships & Ch.Cook or just Ch.Cook same on most fgn going vessels except Pax vessel were they had Ex chef and specialist chefs.


Coasters - Offshore PSVs and Standby Cook or Cook/Steward

Specialist vessels DSVs Chef/manager


Doc years since I heard anyone called Doc\)

We were signing on in the Tyne, Xmas time 1970 sailing 24Th for North Africa
the pool informed the vessel that they had no Ch.Cooks available but they could supply a extra 2nd/Cook/Baker and one of the 2nd/Cooks could sail on my ticket as Ch.Cook.(Thumb) We sailed on 27 Th, with a Ch.Cook. alas I was not on the companies Xmas list after that(Thumb)

Ray

peterga
16th July 2010, 22:25
Anyone remember Mick Hennesey used to work for Union Castle line but ended up offshore on rigs in the North sea smashing bloke lived outside of Southhampton I worked with him in the mid 80s he was a Camp boss I was a steward we both worked for ARA offshore he was a great laugh somtimes you need a crazy bender to break the monotoney couldnt cook for sheet but did a gret tandori everynow and then smoked like a chimney just like most cookies great days....

Nick Balls
16th July 2010, 22:46
I only wish I could write better! Ships cooks, the chef de cuisine, always a story always a nickname! "Two pan Sam' 'Cyanide Sid' 'Crazy Horse'. Some of the excellent food I have seen cooked in some cases in difficult and dangerous circumstances. Terrible cooks who by virtue of a single speciality and a wit could be the life and soul of the vessel. I have even been in the uncomfortable position of being on a small ship at sea with a genuinely insane one! Cooks who made Christmas and then nearly had a nervous breakdown with the complexity of exotic dishes. Cooks who destroyed Christmas by sheer incompetence. To all of them well done lads ! Not a job for the faint hearted.

dom
17th July 2010, 06:27
anyone come across ch.cook Monty Warwick,belive he came fom Manchester

andy60e
3rd January 2011, 01:53
Sailed with a cook onetime (on the BenLawers actually) who cooked a roast on a plastic tray. He thought it was ok because the tray said it was heat resistant......true story!

john fraser
3rd January 2011, 08:40
Sailed with a cook onetime (on the BenLawers actually) who cooked a roast on a plastic tray. He thought it was ok because the tray said it was heat resistant......true story!
Is that the same one that tried to squeeze the corned beef out of the narrow end of the tin so that every slice would be the same size.You could write a book about him

Burned Toast
3rd January 2011, 11:49
A lot of chief cooks I sailed with liked to be known as 'the Chef'.
The one on the Nestor insisted that he was the 'Chef de Cuisine'
Whatever he liked to be called, we knew him as 'Oxtail Ollie' because of his fondness for serving us oxtail stew and his resemblance to Oliver Hardy.


Nice one(Applause)(Applause)(==D)

andy60e
4th January 2011, 14:04
Is that the same one that tried to squeeze the corned beef out of the narrow end of the tin so that every slice would be the same size.You could write a book about him

Could very well be, John....sounds like the kind of thing this guy would do

ernie dixon
6th January 2011, 02:45
anyone come across ch.cook Monty Warwick,belive he came fom Manchester

I sailed with Monty on Esso Tankers.great cook.i was his 2nd cook and fakir.although he was from Manchester originally he lived down in
Falmouth/Cornwall area.I will have to dig out my old discharge books to find the names and dates,it will have been around the late sixties or so and i think it was the Esso Mercia.could be wrong on both counts but will check it out later.

ernie dixon
6th January 2011, 02:54
I sailed with Monty on Esso Tankers.great cook.i was his 2nd cook and fakir.although he was from Manchester originally he lived down in
Falmouth/Cornwall area.I will have to dig out my old discharge books to find the names and dates,it will have been around the late sixties or so and i think it was the Esso Mercia.could be wrong on both counts but will check it out later.

p/s. we also met up again at Liverpool Nautical coll.I was either doing my chief cooks or ch.stewards .this would have been around 1970 ish.What a comedian he was/is.Once again will have to dig out my books.

aflewk
10th July 2011, 22:13
The cooks tickets came in three stages you had to have had at least 3years exp experience for the 1st- 2nd cook/bakers cert. 2nd- at least one year as 2ndck/bkr. ships cook cert and 3rd cheif and ships cook cert was an equivelent qualification for the catering city/guilds 706/2.
Two ships cooks tickets had to be held onboard when deep sea trading the other usually held by the catering officer, somtimes by the 2ndcook..........................

jg grant
10th July 2011, 22:22
Hi maybe I come from an older generation but I went from Assistant steward and got my cooks ticket ,not in stages but in a oner. Sailed out of Leith as A/steward with a cooks ticket until the opportunity came to go as second cook on Charlie Hills Toronto city. Regards Ronnie

Burned Toast
11th July 2011, 11:28
The cooks tickets came in three stages you had to have had at least 3years exp experience for the 1st- 2nd cook/bakers cert. 2nd- at least one year as 2ndck/bkr. ships cook cert and 3rd cheif and ships cook cert was an equivalent qualification for the catering city/guilds 706/2.
Two ships cooks tickets had to be held onboard when deep sea trading the other usually held by the catering officer, sometimes by the 2ndcook..........................

Pre part one cooks certificate, you only had to do the Ships cooks certificate, and spend twelve months in the galley before becoming eligible to sail as Ch/ships Cook. Also you had to be over twenty one years of age. Today or for the last thirty odd years you now have part one and two of a full ships cooks certificate. If you get a higher Cooks certificate that is somewhat similar to the C&G 706/1 not 706/2.

Ray(Thumb)

Burned Toast
11th July 2011, 11:45
Logic would suggest that a Ship's Cook is someone that has attained the appropriate qualification and Chief Cook has that qualification but is employed as the person in charge of one or more other cooks (2nd Cook/Baker for example).

But since when was the MN ever logical? (Jester)


My Lad has C & G 706 1 and 2 now sailing Executive Head Chef in charge of 48 Cooks and stores persons onboard a Cruise Liner.

Nick Batstone
12th July 2011, 00:02
I did my second cooks ticket at Paradise St in Liverpool in 1980 and my cheif cooks at the college of the sea in 84. Whilst there I signed up to do my 706/1 & 2 as a correspondence course and completed them three years later.

All for nothing really, because when I came ashore cooking jobs were so badly paid it wasn't worth it.

Nick Batstone
12th July 2011, 00:04
Sorry that should be chIEf, they only taught us to fry eggs not spell!!!

Burned Toast
12th July 2011, 11:33
I did my second cooks ticket at Paradise St in Liverpool in 1980 and my cheif cooks at the college of the sea in 84. Whilst there I signed up to do my 706/1 & 2 as a correspondence course and completed them three years later.

All for nothing really, because when I came ashore cooking jobs were so badly paid it wasn't worth it.

Did you not try working offshore (Decent pay) or the Middle east on the camps? all gave a decent salary.

John Cassels
12th July 2011, 19:50
Must put in one for the Denholm's crowd.

sailed with a lot of good ch.cooks ( Doc as they liked to be called ) but one
of the best must be Pat Croarkin - sadly deceased. Sailed with him a couple of
times on the Box boats and Forest ships - a bit unorthodox but great food.

He would have surpassed many a chef in the so called michelin restaurants.

Rodney
12th July 2011, 21:14
In the fifties, Union-Castle wanted passenger ship cooks to sit for the Board of Trade Ship's Cook 'ticket. They paid an extra two pounds a month to ticket holders. I passed my exam, August 1957, I was born September, 1937, therefore, I was nineteen years, eleven months old. I served as temporary Ship's Cook for ten days on the Athlone Castle when the ship's cook died...never so glad to scurry back to the passenger kitchen. I was told at the time I was the youngest seaman to have my ticket, and to have actively served as a ship's cook.

Rodney Mills, S,C. U.S.A.
Ship's Cook ticket #40151

muldonaich
12th July 2011, 21:25
Must put in one for the Denholm's crowd.

sailed with a lot of good ch.cooks ( Doc as they liked to be called ) but one
of the best must be Pat Croarkin - sadly deceased. Sailed with him a couple of
times on the Box boats and Forest ships - a bit unorthodox but great food.

He would have surpassed many a chef in the so called michelin restaurants.yes john he was one of the best sadly gone before his time brgds kev

john blythe
14th July 2011, 00:48
just had a look at my ticket; mine is a ships cooks ticket,but allways sined on as cheif cook so i dont know as well

gadge49
17th October 2013, 15:01
The cooks tickets came in three stages you had to have had at least 3years exp experience for the 1st- 2nd cook/bakers cert. 2nd- at least one year as 2ndck/bkr. ships cook cert and 3rd cheif and ships cook cert was an equivelent qualification for the catering city/guilds 706/2.
Two ships cooks tickets had to be held onboard when deep sea trading the other usually held by the catering officer, somtimes by the 2ndcook..........................

I know you needed 2 people with cooks tickets. 4 of us went AWOL from the Luxor after a party in Hong Kong, the other 3 were sent home DBS whereas I (2nd cook & baker) had to fly to Singapore and wait for a week to re-join the ship. Bummer really as it was in December and I thought I would be home for Christmas.

trotterdotpom
17th October 2013, 16:19
I know you needed 2 people with cooks tickets. 4 of us went AWOL from the Luxor after a party in Hong Kong, the other 3 were sent home DBS whereas I (2nd cook & baker) had to fly to Singapore and wait for a week to re-join the ship. Bummer really as it was in December and I thought I would be home for Christmas.

Yep, Chief Cook on Cape Leeuwin jumped ship in Brisbane and we were only able to sail because the Chief Steward had a Cook's ticket. Unfortunately, the one we lost was a better cook.

John T

ALAN TYLER
17th October 2013, 17:10
Got my 2nd Cook & Bakers ticket after 18 months at sea (1964) then my Cooks Ticket in 1968 and sailed as Chief & Ships Cook foreign going 3 weeks before my 22nd birthday, looking back I will admit to being a bit inexperienced for the job in hand. Over the years the experience came with knowledge gained and I,d like to think I was a pretty good "Doc"

John Briggs
15th December 2014, 20:07
An admiral visited one of the ships of the line under his command.
While eating breakfast with the crew in enlisted mess, he was impressed to see the Naval insignia stamped on every biscuit.
He went to the Chief cook to ask how this feat was done so it could be used on other ships under his command.
The Chief replied, "Iíd be glad to share that with you, Admiral. After each biscuit is cut, I just slap it here against my belt buckle which bears the Navy insignia".
Horrified the Admiral exclaims, "That's very unhygienic!"
The Chief shrugs and replies, "Well, If thatís the way you feel, sir, I suggest you avoid the donuts."

ALAN TYLER
19th December 2014, 12:24
An admiral visited one of the ships of the line under his command.
While eating breakfast with the crew in enlisted mess, he was impressed to see the Naval insignia stamped on every biscuit.
He went to the Chief cook to ask how this feat was done so it could be used on other ships under his command.
The Chief replied, "Iíd be glad to share that with you, Admiral. After each biscuit is cut, I just slap it here against my belt buckle which bears the Navy insignia".
Horrified the Admiral exclaims, "That's very unhygienic!"
The Chief shrugs and replies, "Well, If thatís the way you feel, sir, I suggest you avoid the donuts."
Similar to crimping the pastry round the edges of pies using your false teeth!!

trotterdotpom
19th December 2014, 12:32
Similar to crimping the pastry round the edges of pies using your false teeth!!

... or flattening the hamburgers in your armpit.

John T

ALAN TYLER
19th December 2014, 12:39
... or flattening the hamburgers in your armpit.

John T

Why are they called Hamburgers when they,re made out of beef?

trotterdotpom
19th December 2014, 12:52
Dunno, Alan, why are Frankfurters called Frankfurters when they're made by Heinrich?

John T